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Sir-Phin's picture
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What are your opinions on using a prong collar for TRAINING ONLY.

I'm just trying to figure out how to stop Phin from pulling hard on his lead constantly, I'm not a fan of the traditional choker collar (chain with the 2 rings) as the potential for injury is high.

Just last week Phin popped my shoulder out when a bird flew out of the long grass and he jerked and pulled in the opposite way of the direction we were walking.

DJ's Dad's picture
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I used to be of the mind that I would never use a prong collar, because to me they looked like a torture device.  That was before I NEEDED one.  They are not anything like I thought they were.  Before I ever bought one for Ziva, I was at the pet store and put one around my own arm, prongs against my skin, and I pulled against the chain to tighten it up on my arm just to see exactly how much these things really do pinch. It was not the least bit painful.  It left very small indentions on my skin, but the prongs arent sharp and dont penetrate the skin.  I bought one (after reading many many MANY articles about the proper way to use them) and tried it on Ziva because she also would lunge on the leash when we saw  a cat or a squirrel while walking, and an 80 lb dog lunging against a 60 year old shoulder joint was NOT a good combination.  The prong worked wonders.  I dont even have to correct her anymore when she wears it....she instantly knows that the prong collar means business, and it's all good.  I originally bought a large one, but later went to a smaller one (about a half inch wide) and added an extra link to make it fit well, because the weight of the heavier prong made it tend to slide down her neck and the smaller, lighter one stays in position high on the neck much better.

Sir-Phin's picture
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Thank you for the positive support of using the prong collar, Phin is only 14 weeks old but he's already got a lot of strength behind his lunging and over all pulling.  I don't have a 60 year old shoulder, but the 40 year old one that I have has been injured in the past and I just can't take the sudden jerks like I used to and I can only see it getting worse unless I nip it in the bud now with him.

I bought the collar today, but hadn't used it until after I read your reply and had to take Phin out to pee for the last time before bed tonight.  He pulled once (I did not apply any additional resistance) and let out a yelp, and that was all it took for him to know that I wasn't putting up with his pulling.  Normally, once I release him from a sit as we enter the front door he'll bolt past me, didn't do that with the prong collar tonight.

Freyja's Dad's picture
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I've used a prong collar with Freyja with good results.  Despite their menacing look they are actually safer for the dog than a leather/nylon or a choke collar (limited amount of movement).  Just make sure you use one correctly.

I've read several places not to use a prong collar on a puppy under 6 months old.  I can't remember the reasoning off the top of my head, but I've read it in several places.  Given that, I'd carefully research prong collars and their use with puppies. 

blue4's picture
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We started using one with Reesie a month or so ago...made a big difference.  I love it. 

Chipindob's picture
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Sophie really  minds her Gentle Leader, but she constantly rubs at her nose. We were told in class not to use a prong on a pup under 5 months. Sophie will be exactly 5 months next Sunday. I think I might ask if she can switch to a prong. Good luck ~ Soph & Ang

laith's picture
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As long as they are old enough (6 months +). 

One complaint I have about switching to a choke and using a no-pull harness (same brand as gentle leader) ---- they get use to it. No chance in walking with a normal collar these days... I am trying though...

 

Also, not sure if this is true but I hear you aren't suppose to use the choke or prong more than just training purposes. As in, not for a 30 + min walk... just for up and down the sidewalk. That is why I use a front lead harness. 

Just my experience. :)

laith's picture
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As long as they are old enough (6 months +). 

One complaint I have about switching to a choke and using a no-pull harness (same brand as gentle leader) ---- they get use to it. No chance in walking with a normal collar these days... I am trying though...

 

Also, not sure if this is true but I hear you aren't suppose to use the choke or prong more than just training purposes. As in, not for a 30 + min walk... just for up and down the sidewalk. That is why I use a front lead harness. 

Just my experience. :)

laith's picture
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Oh and I hope your shoulder is feeling better!

Keep his leash tighter/closer to you so he can't pull you with that much force on your shoulder.

I was at the park doing training with a 30 ft lead. His 'dad' was fixing a scent training path and told ME "OK" (he was finished). Laith got his command and TOOK OFF. When he hit that 30 ft he had to be going 15mph. It pulled my shoulder out and it wasn't right for days!!! Needless to say we have a different code now to tell me. ha-ha.

 

darth206's picture
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I have used a pronged collar on my previous Doberman and also my Rottie. Both dogs were very respectful. Neither one pulled but once and I use to walk them together. You have to make sure you have control when one dog is 110 lbs and the other one is 157 lbs. Friends use to tell me how cruel I was because of the collar my dogs wore. I would look at their knees and say I can't believe your 40 lb. dog drag's you around like he does. No wonder they would rarely have their dog with them. When I would see them with them they would have one of those shocking (torturer devices) collars. My guys would go every where with me. Even when we would go camping my dogs would be completely loose and when I told them to 'leave it' or 'here'. They responded immediately. My most recent dog Foxy- Austrian cattle dog- wore one years ago for just a few months. She now wears a regular nylon one only when on walks or camping. But people always say how well trained all my dogs are and I contribute their respect for me,partially because of the use of a pronged collar. When Duncan is old enough he too will wear a pronged collar (at times). I just feel more of a responsible owner, when I can control my dogs. I know my dogs are happier, safer and I can spend my money on dog toys and the best food I can buy instead of rehab for knees, shoulders and elbows!! :)

laith's picture
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I agree. If used properly it is a wonderful training tool. It teaches communication and boundaries. I never judge a owner using a collar or training tool if the owner is in control of the dog. People are just sometimes uneducated about the breed and equipment out there. :(  We never used a gentle leader because so many people tend to think it is a muzzle. They are already afraid of a doberman, much less when the mouth/neck is strapped down. 

Different products work best on different dobermans. Just a process of elimination. I believe when I am confident, he is confident in me. Keeps both of us calm. :)

KevinK's picture
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You should not be using anything but a flat bucklle collar on a 14 week old dog.  I would strongly suggest agains using it on a puppy so young.  At this age, you want to keep the training as positive as possible without the use of adversives and punishment.  It's not fair to punish a dog for something it doesn't know is wrong.  I would suggest teaching your dog to be less reactive to things when you're out, so you don't get the lunging and pulling.

Using a prong collar on a 14 week old pup for pulling is kinda like spanking a baby for pooping in his diaper, and not understanding that he should be using the toilet.  You definitely want to use more positive techniques, especially at such a young age.

nupe's picture
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Joined: 2010-10-02

i belive in a prong, but not for young pups...but for a older dog...used correctly (right behind the ears and snug) I think its a great training tool!!

bbroyles's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-09

Prong pressure- what is too much? Not enough? I'm using with Leo, but he still pulls. Not nearly as much as he would without it. But I don't have confidence to get the best results and haven't found the resources that give enough answers. Can anyone give me a little more on correct use?

nupe's picture
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Joined: 2010-10-02

bbroyles...check out link....maybe this will help

 

http://leerburg.com/fit-prong.htm

Control_Freak's picture
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I agree with everyone that prong collars are amazing but have to be used properly and fit properly.  I do not know what age is appropriate to start using but I would guess 4 months is a little young, I know its rough now but keep working it will be better.

Nupe- thanks for the link, it was really thourough.  I hate seeing people using them incorrectly.  I had a groomer tell me last week that Athena's collar was too tight and she had nicks in her fur from it and that I should put a few extra links in it.  The nicks in her neck are from Sully and her playing with his sharp puppy teeth.  The problem I have is her neck is so slender it will not stay behind her ears, doesn't matter how snug it is, it always slides down.

DJ's Dad's picture
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Barb, I have used a prong on Ziva because she used to LOVE to 'pull' against the leash when walking, and still will if I allowed it.  Not just a steady, tight leash, but PULL, like in dragging me along behind her, and I would have to come to a complete stop and almost lean backwards to keep her from pulling me faster than I wanted to go.  When I first started using a prong collar on her (she was over a year old at the time) it immediately stopped her from pulling. It was a totally new sensation to her, and she complied 100%.  Now that she is a little more used to having it on, she is more at ease with it.  As we continue our walk, however, she occasionally will still put just enough pressure against the least to keep it taught and not loose, and I just sort of 'pop' the leash very lightly and give her a verbal "EEHHH!" to remind her that it's still there, and I am still in charge of the walk and the speed we go,  and she slows back down.  Usually if we are on a 45 min - to - 1 hour walk, I can take the prong collar off her after the first 10 - 15 minutes and just hook her leash to her flat collar (I always keep a flat collar on her when we use a prong, so that I can switch over, and it's also good insurance in case the prong would break or come loose).  Once in a great while, I'll find a reason to put it back on her before we get back home, usually because there are squirrels in a tree that she wants to.....play with....LOL...but I only put it back around her neck and hook up to it until we get past the distraction.  If I had let her slowly build up a tolerace to the feel of the prong as she put a little more pressure against it and didnt give it a correctional little pop when needed, I would have the same problem that I was trying to avoid---only she'd be pulling against the leash with the prongs poking her neck, which is NOT the intended purpose of the training collar.  So, personally, I dont feel that it's wrong to give a correctional pop with a prong collar, as long as you only use the smallest amount of pressure that's necessary to give the correction.  I'm a 'positive rewards' believer, but sometimes a hard headed dog needs a little reminder of who is really the boss.

Wolfgirl_121's picture
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Do you guys think 7mos is too young to start with the prong... Skye is pretty darn sure that the stray kitties around here want to "play"...

KevinK's picture
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Everyone also remember, a prong collar is just a tool, it's not something that's going to always just fix the problem.  Even with a prong collar on, you should still be doing the same training that you would do in a flat buckle collar.  You still need to teach the dog what you DO want, not just punish for what you don't.

bbroyles's picture
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Nupe - thanks! Looks like this has more info and good photos! I started reading and had to move on to something else... So going to finish looking at it now. Thanks for posting!

bbroyles's picture
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"If I had let her slowly build up a tolerace to the feel of the prong as she put a little more pressure against it and didnt give it a correctional little pop when needed, I would have the same problem that I was trying to avoid---only she'd be pulling against the leash with the prongs poking her neck, which is NOT the intended purpose of the training collar."

Paul~I think that is exactly the problem I'm having. I don't know how forceful to "pop". Perhaps I'm overly concerned on that, as these 59ish wrists don't have the strength they once did! I broke the dominant (right) wrist about a year ago and am now proud recipient of yet one more titanium plate! Maybe I don't even have the strength to hurt Leo with the prong. Opening a water bottle is a challenge sometimes! This is my first experience with the prong and I would not want to hurt due to negligent/incorrect use. Before joining this forum, I also was in the category of "why would anyone put that their dog's neck". I don't remember having read any negatives on prong use here. Lots of positive results from you folks that I've been reading for some time now.
One more question, which may be answered after I finish Nupe's source, is how snug it should fit on the neck. Right now I have the links/length so that it sits in the position just under the ears. However, it does work itself down to a lower position during use. Also, stupid wrist problem...I can't just squeeze the prong to place it on his neck. It takes a few tries...have to get the titanium warmed up! Anyway, taking one more link out might keep it up by ears, but harder/tighter on Leo when I'm putting it on. So, what do you think? Leave as is or take another link out?
Not intending to be overly concerned, but finding the right size took 3 trips to PetSmart...because I didn't have a clue!
Thanks for hanging in there with me on this! I appreciate the help!

Happydance's picture
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Barb, I hear ya on the wrist, hand thing.  It's hard to even put it on sometimes.  Fancy is still growing and unfortunately inbetween sizes, so it slips down a little.  We are working on heeling, so on the stop, sit, I take a second to readjust it up.  I've noticed that you do have avoid the steady pull thing, as they will get used to it with the prong.  As with the Gentle Leader, alot of the time it will do the correcting without you having to do anything.  But, if you have to pop, it's really not much pressure needed to get the point across.  It's so much better than chokers IMO.

bbroyles's picture
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Happydance, thanks for the feedback:)
Seems like I always need to readjust the collar when he's spotted something that is way too compelling to sit nicely while the old lady gets her wrist working! Ha! Memorial Day we packed up a lunch and hunted down a river spot. My son secured Leo on the long line to a cool tree-shaded spot. As im stretching out the quilt and laying back to enjoy the pecan trees against blue skies, the kids take off in a race for the car. Leo, like most kids, responds to the laughter and movement, spins off and catches me with line! Darn nearly flipped me into the river, but I felt really lucky to still have my head in place! Lesson learned:)

Legend of Zelda's picture
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I've been using a prong on Zelda since she turned 6 months because of her horrid pulling habit, but now she's outgrown the one I have because I can't find the rest of the links (this prong collar is pretty old since it belonged to my late chow-mix Shadow when she was Zelda's age). Did wonders for her, but now that she's off of it, she's pulling again. I need to get a new one. Or maybe a Secret Power prong http://www.lolalimited.net/Secretprong.html

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Barb---here's a tip you might want to take on prong collars:  The smaller width ones (aka 'baby prongs or 'small' sized ones) are SO much easier to squeeze apart to put on and remove.  That's what I use most of the time on Ziva.  I had to buy 2 extra links to make it fit her, but it goes on and comes off with so much less power involved on my fingers and wrist.  Works exactly the same way as the bigger ones, and it isn't quite as menacing looking, either.  Almost looks 'cute' on her, in fact. LOL

The smaller width prong collars are lighter weight, too, and tend to not slip down quite as often as the heavier ones do.  I still have to slide it back up where it's supposed to be a few times, but that's ok.  I dont have it so tight that it puts constant pressure on her neck, either.  Because all dogs have a slightly different sized neck, it's more than likely not going to be a perfect fit, since the length of a single link is the only adjustment you can do---it might be a teeny bit too loose or a teeny bit too tight, but I would rather go with erring on the loose side than to have it too tight when she's walking without pulling.

You dont have to put a lot of pressure into a 'pop', it's not inteded to cause pain by any means---just gets the dog's attention more or less. You just have to let the dog know that you're doing it as a correction, not as a punishment. Use your entire arm to flick it back if you need to.  You really are not going to hurt him....have you noticed how THICK the skin and fur are on your dog's neck?  If those blunt prongs don't hurt my bare arm, they're certainly not going to hurt Ziva's leather-like skin around her neck, and it won't hurt Leo, either.

nupe's picture
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I have one of those collars @ ZELDA..LOL

 

bbroyles's picture
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Legend ~ those are fine looking collars. Ive looked at them before! Love the tapestries! Nupe, which does the better job, Secret Lola or that super stud silver one, forgot the name, but looks like scales. It's on the Leeburg link and I know Buddy's got one hanging in his closet ^.^ ! And I'm loving the looks of the Amish, handmade leathers. I could get soooo carried away with just these two sites! Paul, the weight of the collar.... Having a "Duh" moment here! I believe Petsmart carries S M L XL. I started with S, went to L and then back to M. One more...in the Leeburg photos the collar "ring" area is positioned on the right side of the dog's neck. I've been trying to keep it top-center. Seems like to the right makes more sense (weight wise too)! Thanks for all the suggestions and links! I'm feeling encouraged and empowered! I would like to get a handle on this! And @ BUDDY. More distinguished than ever!!!

nupe's picture
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bbroyles, they both get the job done equally....I like the secret Lola alot because it hides the prongs, where everyone does not see them and make judgements or give you nasty looks, like you have a vicious uncontrollable dog....but to answer your question again, both equally effective!!

laith's picture
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I put Laith in his bra. (harness). 

Any experience on the 2 loop leash? 

bbroyles's picture
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Love the photo Paul!
And, Ziva Girl, Thank You for modeling the collars for us! Be sure and pack that prong away for the little brother that's bound to move in someday!

bbroyles's picture
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I wanted to post an update on prong with Leo. I'm seeing (and feeling) a lot more success thanks to everyone's input. I feel like the fit is right and the position too Now that I've added the "pop" it's making quite a difference. He was pulling the prong. Now that the pop is the reaction he gets, he drops right back in place!
Thanks to all for your answers. A tremendous help !

Sir~Phin, how's prong going with you?

Lady Kate's picture
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Yippee Skippee Barb,,

It's the little things in life that make it such a joy

Congratulations on your stick-to-it-attitude..

great job.. Now.. let's get that battery in that camera and SHOW US
smooches to the pooches

KT

bbroyles's picture
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Yeah, Lady K, I've had extra teens in the house for two weeks now! Expecting one more after this week! I'm going to HEB every day for more food! When do I get a memory card or the sanity to remember to purchase it?
Nothing quite like a teenager, two legs, four legs, ten legs ...
You can see I'm loosing it...
What has 10 legs at the teenage stage..?

unityspirit's picture
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What about an anti pull harness. Anyone have experience with those? I hate the thought of chocking my puppy or pinching her or anything else that sounds sort of abusive language wise. I thought antipull sounds nice. 

Joined: 2011-06-21

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NO NO NO!!!! NO ANTI-PULL!!!!!!!!! Tat pulled like the dickens on those. I think the dog gets used to the squeezing feeling after a while.

KevinK's picture
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A prong collar is much, much more humane than the general public things.  They see spikes, and imagine it on a neck, and then think of the worst.  In reality, for a dog that pulls while walking, a prong collar is MUCH safer and more humane for a pulling dog.

Everyone needs to remember, again, that these are just TOOLS.  A collar doesn't fix a behavior, TRAINING fixes the behavior, and a collar is a tool used in the training.  Emphasis should be placed on training technique moreso than what collar you choose for your dog.  If you put on a prong collar, but don't train your dog to do what you want, all you're going to get is a dog that walks good when the collar is on.  But, it's not really fixing the problem.  It's almost like if your floor in your living room is messy, and you just cover it with a blanket...  The floor doesn't look dirty anymore, but you take off the blanket, and the mess has not magically disapeared.  Same applies here.  Regardless of what collar you decide to use, for it to be as effective as possible, the techniques need to be solid.

unityspirit's picture
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I love how you put that KevinK. Very well said. I wasn't going to use anything but regular collar either.since shes 14 weeks this saturday.  Being im getting senile lol I forgot most of what I learned over the years with my other pups since its been 10 years that I had one. But Athena seems to explain to me what I need to do or not to do. She is extremely sensitive but also very  rambunctious. *sp*  I found  an old  paper clip I had of my Tuvok Male when he got his picture taken in our local paper. Back in 2004 I believe

 



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We started with a regular collar for Hera. She was just a puppy then. We had gone and gotten a really strong leather collar  and was hoping that is all we would need. We were wrong. lol So we got a choker at 6 months. Not our best idea. It did not work well. She kept tightening it more and more I was worried she was going to hurt her throat. So went to the store thought the prong would hurt her as well. We tried it. Put it on her and walked her in the store what a difference. We also got one of the harnesses. We use that if we are at grandma's but, it is not real stable in our experience. If we would be out walking with her she still has to much control of pulling us with the harness. Love the prongs. I always thought they were cruel but, for a strong dog it works. She loves her walks. We do to now.

JO_SIE70's picture
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Hi,

 

My Mac is walked in a standard martingale collar and lead- no prongs, no check chains. I taught him from day one that pulling will not be tolerated and I will not follow him when he pulls on the lead. It has taken time on my part, but it is a pleasure now to walk a 40kg entire male Dobe with nothing more than a bit of fabric around his neck. The only way prongs work is by applying a negative consequence to the act of pulling on the lead- that negative consequence is pain. Yes it works- to reduce the pulling behaviour as most dogs want to avoid pain but is this really the answer to not training the dog to walk correctly on a standard collar/ or matingale if you are worried your dog will slip its collar? In the UK you rarely see a prong collar- people use headcollars more which I feel are a gentle more natural way of teaching good lead walking manners quickly. Why do so many people in the USA use prong collars- are they being recommended/sold by 'dog trainers' or is it the use of them on TV programmes such as Ceasar millan which have made them the 'training collar' of the moment.

 

Jo

KevinK's picture
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Jo,

It's a very common mistake for people to see the spikes on a prong, and think that it's a torture device.  It comes down to the general public not having the correct information to make an informed decision.  In reality, the concept behind a prong and a martingale are very similar, a correction is applied by putting some pressure, or if the dog decides to lunge ahead.  For a drivey, reactive dog, prong collars are actually much more humane than the martingale you use.  Yes, training needs to be done as well, like I said above.  WIth your martingale, if a correction is applied, the pressure is focused around the throat.  With a prong, that pressure is spread across the entire neck, and is actually much more gentle as a result.  You will also need significantly less pressure in the event that your dog decides to pull, lunge, chase something, etc.  Yes, these are training issues, but even for the best behaved dogs sometimes get excited.

Prong collars absolultely do not hurt, provided you are using them correctly.  That's another myth.  There have also been numerous reports analyzing dogs that are walked on prongs, flat buckles, etc., and the dogs wearing the prongs always have less neck injury.  That's another reason why a head harness is a terrible idea for dobermans, and nobody uses them really.  It's a good way to hurt your dogs neck, even if the neck doesn't appear to be hurt, there is likely damage that would be seen on an x-ray.

The people that put a collar on, walk, and that's it are not using the tools properly, like I outlined above.

As to why so many people in USA use prongs, I'm not sure exactly where you get that, but I rarely if ever see people out with prongs unless they have bigger working breed dogs.  More people SHOULD be using them, but are scared because they don't understand how they work.

Please, don't ever put a head collar on your doberman.

KellyF37's picture
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Will investigate the prong collar after a year old... plan to stick with my Martingale collar from cozycritter.com.  It has the mini-chain, closure.  Love it.  Slip it up by her ears (19 weeks) and I have a little dragonfly on the end of my leash. :)

bbroyles's picture
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Leerburg's
Prong Collar Leash™

 
This Amish Made Latigo Leather leash is 6 feet long and ¾ in wide with solid brass clips. This leash is made so that a prong collar is attached to one clip and dominant dog collar™ (or backup collar) is attached to second clip. There is a 6 inch tab attached to clip end of the leash for that 2nd collar. When or if the prong collar fails and comes off the dog, the second collar is already attached without interfering with the prong collar corrections. Dominant dog collars™ and prong collars sold separately.

Black
Product #5131

$39.50+s&h

Brown
Product #5231

$39.50+s&h

Related Items:

Prong Collars

Dominant Dog Collars™

tans0077's picture
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Gauge got his prong collar on Tuesday night before training.  WOW.  I'm a believer - 100%!  The instant it went on, he stood up straighter and the urge to pull was gone.  He never whined when it went on either.  After a few minutes of getting used to it, I walked him back and forth across the yard and there was not a single pull from him.  I was amazed that I was barely holding the leash.

We're using it for training only, and walks in the park because that's where he's his craziest.  I love it.  He sits right down and waits for it to go on and when it is, he's all business. 

I'm a firm believer in prongs but... There is no need to go get the huge prong collars that you see in all the pet stores. I ONLY use the baby prongs. I'm going to put the only photo I have of mine wearing it so you can see how little the prongs are. In the picture it was actually turned inside out not on purpose just happened.

I like Kevins comment that the prong is a tool. You still have to train your dog not to pull just like you would with any other collar. People actually need to learn the correct way to use the collar otherwise the dog will pull into it just like any other form of collar.

Sir-Phin's picture
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That's great that you're getting a positive response to the "pop".

Phin's been doing great with his prong, he doesn't pull while on walks anymore and even when he's on his flat collar to go out to do his business he doesn't pull like he used to.

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I only use a martingale collar so he does not slip his collar and I can have it on a looser setting as you would with a sighthound. The gencon headcollar was designed for a doberman so I find it very hard to beleive that it will actually injure the dog.. if this was the case and had been proven then I am sure they would not legally be able to sell the collars to the pet market.

There is no pressure applied around the throat with a martingale or standard collar I personally cannot see the argument around this in favour of a prong. Also I would like to read these numerous reports which have been carried out, where can I see a copy of them, and who has funded the studies?

I work at a vets and there is a clinical canine physio on site who is also a qualified vet. Dogs which have injuries to neck, spine, lameness and lack of coordination  as is often seen in large dogs which are slow to mature are always fitted with headcollars to aid their recovery and improve posture/gait/movement.

If the prong collar is a training tool- then surely it can be phased out once the dog has learnt to walk correctly on the lead and a standard collar can once again be fitted? If this is the case then why do people continually walk/train dogs in these collars, because without them the 'pain' correction is not there and therefore the dog pulls on the lead as it now has nothing to avoid.

And with regards to the prong collars having much more 'followers' in the USA is absolutly true. The fact they are even sold in pet stores goes to show they have customers wanting them. You cannot buy prong collars or electric collars in UK pet shops or stores.

 

Jo

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Based on your above, if they couldn't sell a head collar because it was dangerous and painful, and could possibly cause injury, doesn't that mean the same must apply to prongs?  And if they were in fact dangerous, they wouldn't be able to sell them?  You keep thinking prongs cause pain, and again, it's simply not true.

Your aversion to prongs is based on not understanding them...  So, I would recommend doing some research, all the info is readily available online.  If you still choose not to use them, that's fine.  I have never once used a prong, or e-collar, but it's not because I don't think they work, or I think they are torture devices, I just prefer other methods.

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Barb thanks for sharing those leashes, I def might have to look into them. I always worry about the collar coming undone when I need it most.

Joined: 2011-09-11

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I can not get Dillinger to stop pulling... hes 2 yrs old now and still pulls me around town.. i will be getting him a prong collar very soon. but i need to know about he backup collar. can u use a choke chain for that? and how do u attach the backup collar to the prong collar? also cant it be worn all the time while walking him? and not just for training? i really want to get him a black prong collar.their hard to find.

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What have you tried to stop the pulling?

Joined: 2011-09-11

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choke chain, and a harness. but thats not really doing much good.the harness. so im using it to bicycle with him.