Still having accidents in the house??!! Are they even accidents?

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Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Buddy is my love but I must tell you that he seems to be using my den as a toilet. Unless you are closely watching him for signs that he needs to go, he will simply walk in there and do his business!

I hate crating him when we are home but I cannot stare at him while I'm trying to cook, etc. so we've been putting him in there until we get settled enough to pay attention. My rug is pretty much ruined and I won't change it until he's over this but what could I possible be doing wrong????

 

He gets a parade whenever he 'goes' outside... (the neighbors think I have special needs)

When he is crated we take him right outside...

Firmly state, NO INSIDE, WRONG, etc in a low, growly voice when he does go inside...

 

HELP!!!!!

 

HarleyBear's picture
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Oh Gosh, he is still a baby.  19 weeks?  I don't think Harley was fully potty trained at that age.  You kind of have to make it work for your house and living situation.  Close doors, baby gates, x-pens, whatever you have to do so that he is in your line of sight.  Or else, use the crate.  But don't stress, the more consistent you are the faster he will get it.

tess's picture
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I agree with Harley. Its like potty training a child..some get it quicker than others. Dont stress and keep doing what you are doing.  I promise it will work just give him some more time. Good luck.

 

Tess

kittykatb's picture
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I had the same problem with Bella until I spotted she only did it when the door was closed and she couldn't get out.  She was giving me a little whinge but I wasn't noticing.

Now I've figured it out I can listen for it or I leave the door open (getting colder now so not very practical).

I'm going to have a crack at bell training.

Good luck!

x

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Thanks all, I feel better... the issue is really that we aren't able to let him go out when he feels like he needs to because we don't have a fence for him. He needs to be walked every time. I just wish he would at least whine or something to let us know he needs to go. I can be patient about this knowing that he will get it one day... hopefully soon! lol

If you can't watch him - then either crate him or tether him to you.  If he goes in the house, you need to roll up some newspaper and.... hit yourself over the head with it while saying "I wasn't watching him"

Sounds like a fence should be at the top of your list.  I also tell people that if you can't fence your whole yard, then get a kennel run - you can buy them at plenty of home improvement type places.  Also, you can do a temporary fenced area with the inexpensive wire rolled fencing and metal fence stakes. 

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Great advice... we hadn't thought of a fence til you mentioned it! lol

Well, we're on over an acre and have been discussing a kennel run but as you know, he is a bit young to be out by himself... We bought a tether set with a 30ft lead and he plays until you walk away and then cries that he is being left alone. :(

We don't mind walking him but sometimes after we walk a mile and have some yard time together and he still doesn't go, (we assume he doesn't have to. We haven't taught him to tell us yet, lol.) the minute he comes in the house he'll go right in the middle of the living room in front of us!

We have good days and bad... just like everyone else.

Mama

Lots of puppies will go for long walks without doing their business and then come back and potty.... they are not learning what they are supposed to do and you are not teaching it from what you are saying.  Basically you are setting him up for failure... and I know you don't think you are but that is what you have done. 

What he has learned is that he can go in the house.... so he has learned a bad habit that needs to be unlearned.  Don't even let him off the leash in the house till he learns where he is supposed to go and where he isn't.  If you can' be watching him every second then put him in the crate. 

When he does go outside, praise and treat him immediately - he has to associate the treat with going potty outside.... not even 10 seconds later. 

Some puppies learn not to potty inside quickly, but I have found that most puppies are not reliable in the house till they are at least 5 months old..... and really closer to 6 months for many. Till they are not making any mistakes and are at least 5-6 months old, don't take your eyes off them for even a second.

As far as the fence issue - the things you have said are exactly why I require fences. 

KevinK's picture
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You say if you're not closely watching him he will go to the bathroom in the house... well, this is what young dogs do, and it shouldn't be surprising.  If you can't watch him, crate him, and make sure you take him out more.  

My 2 year old foster peed in the house a few times, and I got pissed....  at myself, for failing to take him out as often as he needs.  So now, I take him out more often, and no problems.  And the fence is not a good excuse, you can get a long lead for him so he can run around and still be safe.  I don't have a fence either, and it has never been a problem with my dog, anybody elses dog, or any of our fosters.

Lori's picture
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Our rescue girl comes to the bed and pokes me with her nose if she has to go out at night,  2 nights ago, I was super tired and I told her to go lay down rather than get up.   You can imagine what I found in front of the TV later that morning....

 

when they have to go, they have to go and I now get up no matter the time and let her out as she asks.....I'm really just happy she tells me honestly. 

 

she is just over a year and we are working on getting her to scratch the door to go out like Rocky - but it's only been 3 weeks, mainly we are just dililgent about taking her out every hour or so....and throwing a potty parade when she goes.  We also tell her 'go potty' so she will begin to associate it with what we want her to do also. 

talisin's picture
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hahahahah Fitzmar that's hysterical about rolling up the paper and hitting yourself over the head, that's great advice I will use that one in my newsletter for the rottie group too funny!!!! but oh so true......

kittykatb's picture
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Bella wakes me in the middle of the night to go too!

I've taken the advice of people on this forum and started Bella's bell training.  We're still in the touch training phase but it's looking really promising!!!

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Fitzmar, Thank you for your help and I would like to clarify a few things...

He doesn't go in the house everytime... most of the time he does his business outside. Sorry, I thought I was clear in my first post.

Buddy has just turned 5 months old, so he is on the threshold of what you referred to as being unreliable in the house. Are you saying that he should be on a leash tethered to me or in the crate all day until he gets it? That doesn't sound realistic to me but I will try it.

Kevin, I am not using the no fence comment as an excuse. I was merely stating that we don't have one and cannot just let him out the door with no thought of what he'd be doing out there. I enjoy walking and playing with him outside and it's never a problem to take him for a walk... I have tethered him in the yard several times and he just cries and barks after a few minutes. He is not used to being alone for long, especially outside.

I realize that many of you have been here for years and have heard the same questions over and over but I posted this question for help, not to be ridiculed. :)

KevinK's picture
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But MANY can't let their dogs out like that...  I dont' have a fence either.  That's why I have a 30 ft lead for dogs that I don't trust to not run out of the yard, and they still can run around and have fun.  I think MOST dobermans would start whining if they were tethered in the yard, that's not what I meant.  Watch this quick clip, you'll see what I mean.  Abe, our foster at the time is on a 30 ft lead so he can still go around and play and whatnot.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18zy7D9NXec

You were not ridiculed, there's good answers here that will help you.  I think you just have some un-realistic expectations from a dog of this age.

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Great video! I subscribed to you so I can see all the others you've posted as well. Pretty pups!

 

I do have a 30 ft lead for him as well and I play with him while he's tethered. I will figure this out as Buddy is a wonderful boy and I won't be giving up - thanks so much for your help and advice!

I'm not ridiculing you, and you are getting very defensive - I don't have a lot of time to make my posts sound "nice".  I don't advocate leaving him in a crate all the time - keeping him tethered to you is what I suggested, but if he can't be tethered or watched like a hawk - then crate him. Realistically, we do have to crate our dogs sometimes - especailly puppies!

Don't leave him in the yard tied up - it isn't teaching him what you need him to learn - you need to be there to praise & treat him when he goes.  A fenced yard makes it easier as you don't have to have him on a leash or long line.... but you still need to be out with him till he totally "gets" it.

HarleyBear's picture
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Kevin,

That is amazing!  How did you do that?  Really, how did you do that? 

Harley is not patient.  If I hold him back he will cry, whine, and then start barking, lunging forward.  If I let go after it, while it is Ellie's turn, he will trample her.  So fetch is not fun for Ellie.

Really, I need to know how to teach that.

 

Sorry Buddy's Mama I hijacked your thread.    But that video just blew me away!

KevinK's picture
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Thanks Harley.  Abe was a completely untrained dog, literally didn't know 1 command, as he had never had a home.  He went from kill shelter to kill shelter, saved only by his awesome personality.  Finally a rescue came to save his life, they took him to the vet, and never went back to get him.  Quite sad...

Anyways, I do these kinds of things by having a mutual respect, being fair, CONSISTENT, and showing dogs things in a way that makes sense to them, and is easy to understand.  If you look at my Abe videos, you will see that I use a pretty high pitch, excited voice.  When you can figure out how to engage a dog, and get them excited about whatever your doing, the rest kinda fits in place.  Dogs respond quite a bit to your body language, and tone of voice.  if I said "Come" in a deep, booming voice, Abe probably would go the other way.  But a high pitch excited voice, and he can't resist the temptation to come see what I'm doing.  What works for Abe may or may not work for another dog, and I think it's important to be able to figure out what style, methods, techniques etc. will work for that PARTICULAR dog.  No one size fits all with dog training, in my opinion.  With Abe, who never had any kind of real positive interaction and attention from humans, a scritch on the head was the ultimate reward.  You tell him to come, and he gets a scritch on the ear.  After a few times, it's solid.  Find the HIGHEST value reward, use methods that BEST suit the individual dog, and be CONSISTENT, and 75% of your work is done.

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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I am truly not getting defensive, just trying to understand what you're saying. Why do I need a dog run or a fence if I need to be out there with him anyway?  At this point, I really don't want to go back and forth negatively, I just wanted some help from experienced people. I know you said you have no time to make your posts sound "nice" but to me, anything worth while doing is at least worth doing positively.

Again, thank you for your advice, it is greatly appreciated.

 

Mama

KevinK's picture
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The answers are here.  Whether you choose to follow the advice or not is up to you. But below, is all GREAT stuff from this thread, and is no different than what a paid trainer would tell you.

 

If you can't watch him - then either crate him or tether him to you.  If he goes in the house, you need to roll up some newspaper and.... hit yourself over the head with it while saying "I wasn't watching him"

 

Close doors, baby gates, x-pens, whatever you have to do so that he is in your line of sight.  Or else, use the crate.

 

What he has learned is that he can go in the house.... so he has learned a bad habit that needs to be unlearned.  Don't even let him off the leash in the house till he learns where he is supposed to go and where he isn't.  If you can' be watching him every second then put him in the crate. 

When he does go outside, praise and treat him immediately - he has to associate the treat with going potty outside.... not even 10 seconds later. 

If you can't watch him, crate him, and make sure you take him out more.  

 

mainly we are just dililgent about taking her out every hour or so....and throwing a potty parade when she goes.  We also tell her 'go potty' so she will begin to associate it with what we want her to do also. 

 

Don't leave him in the yard tied up - it isn't teaching him what you need him to learn - you need to be there to praise & treat him when he goes.  A fenced yard makes it easier as you don't have to have him on a leash or long line.... but you still need to be out with him till he totally "gets" it.

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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We had a very good weekend... only one accident and it was by the front door. I have started working with him on a good way to communicate that he has to go out. I touch his nose with the back of my hand and say "out" and then take him out.

Potty parade commences, treats given within seconds and scritches and fun are had by all.

By Sunday afternoon, he was touching my hand to go out (many times just to play, lol) and I really think he's getting it! He is still a baby and I know it will take time but I feel like he's starting to realize that my living room is not the 'rest area' any longer.

Go Buddy!