male on male aggression? HELP!!!

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xzmoorex's picture
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Joined: 2012-10-31

Okay i recently posted a thread as to where someone one made a very big point to me that i was COMPLETELY unaware of. I have a male dachshund and just recently got our male doberman. The breeder didnt think anything of it when we said we had our dachshund so we figured it would be fine but after coming across the threads and such i found make on male aggression issues! I just want to know what we can do to hopefully prevent it. They just play right now and havent had any problems but what is the best way to hopefully prevent the event from happening because my girlfriend wouldnt be able to stand anything happening to the poor little weeny dog! and i am SO about my dobe. I would gladly take any advice i can get and have already been reading. I have read some people have no problems with multiple males and some do. We try to socialize him as much as possible and we keep a good eye on them all. Mind you he is just turning 7 weeks! 

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I would suggest finding the posts by DJ's Dad and Kevin's post - both have posted a great response telling someone how to spot body language that is indicative of an issue about to start, once that issue starts there is no "training" them not to, you just have to keep them separated. And no matter how quick you think your reflexes are your doberman will be faster than you so don't think you can stop it by moving quickly by the time you get there a few feet away someone will have a puncture wound or worse. This is one of the reasons it pays by the ton to research heavily any dog breed before getting it. I am sure others will chime in but at some point you may have to rehome a dog or live separate. See my response to your other mention of this.

And listen closely to those who come in and post their experiences with this problem. I am so glad that I requested a female doberman, I cancelled my puppy reservation and did not get a doberman for some of these issues mentioned.

xzmoorex's picture
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Joined: 2012-10-31

i started reading and i really wish i would have looked more into getting one now, i read a lot on them being very good dogs and such but never thought to look into this. Not even the breeder mentioned to say anything and knew we had our weeny dog.... I honestly think we might have to start thinking about finding a home because our weeny dog is my girlfriends life and i dont want any animals blood on my hands.... I am super super upset now, my girlfriend even thought to maybe see if i could trade someone for a female pup but man im bummed i dont know what to do now....truly sad! Haha, i havent been so pumped to get a dog in a long time and just having him a couple weeks have made me even more excited and now im crushed! :/

Roreh's picture
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Joined: 2012-08-07

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When I was researching getting a male dobie a breeder I was looking into told me this...

 

"... I do have one concern, Dobermans can be prone to same sex aggression. It is a problem I have never personally experienced in 29 years of having dobes. Nor do I personally know anyone who has. I have heard stories about it and know it can and does happen. I won't go as far as saying no I can't let you have Diesel, because I feel environment has a huge role. And nobody knows your environment better than you.  Who am I to tell you what will or won't work in your home. Doing the best job I can for you and Diesel and your other boy, I am obligated to let you know, that it is a possibility and you are taking a risk. If you do have any concerns with 2 males and their ability to get along, I would highly suggest taking a female instead. A friend of mine has 3 males 8-5-2 years old, no problems ever. In the Doberman world same sex aggression is a slippery slope with opinions varying greatly. So I just want to make you fully aware of the potential for something bad to happen."

xzmoorex's picture
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Joined: 2012-10-31

Thanks for your thoughts on it, i have been reading all night and have found so much information on it, and its seriously just a hit or miss thing. It's scary, but i feel like i dont want to give up my dobe yet for something that might never happen.( i know it's very likely) I talked to my girlfriend and we decided that we are going to keep him and just do the best we can about learning signs for it and we are enrolling him in any and all classes to help socialize and train him. I hope that since otis is such a small dog that maybe it will play some roll in things. Maybe Dobie wont be as prone to aggression with him since he is small and maybe not as much of a threat. who knows, but I do love my dobe GREATLY already and would hate to see him go for something i am not sure will happen. I am aware of the risks but i will just take it day by day and if i start noticing things changing i will have to rethink things and make a decision that will benefit the well being of both dogs!

DJ's Dad's picture
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Joined: 2010-10-04

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If your doxie is a very passive or submissive dog, your chances of male-on-male aggression between the two of them will be much smaller.  If, however, your dachshund gets a little aggressive, defensive, or snarky with the doberman later on (especially after the dobie has grown much bigger and has more confidence than he does now, as a small puppy) I'd suggest that you keep them separated and ALWAYS supervised.

You're correct in thinking that it might not ever happen....and the fact that you are aware of the possibilities of something triggering an aggressive reaction between the two now, before it ever gets to that point (if, in fact, it ever should) is a big plus on your part. 

So many times, aggression builds up so slowly and subtly that it's almost not even noticed by humans unless they are watching for signs.  Dont hold back in keeping the two from rough-housing now.  Your dobie is going to grow so fast and be overpowering to the smaller guy before you even realize it. 

Teach them BOTH to respect the other one's personal space. Teach them both to be gentle with each other.  It's so much better to instill in them both that they can co-exist rather than worry about them being playmates together.

Please dont think its cute if they growl and play tug of war with toys now....that can easily turn into a power struggle and in time, the doxie might easily get defensive towards the doberman....when you're small, self-preservation is a big issue.   Just be aware and keep on top of things.   Training will be your best bet on keeping things running smooth.

PS--Is your dachshund neutered?  If not, that's a MUST.  Also, consider having your doberman neutered when he is old enough. 

Tayoh and I's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-08

One of very few downsides to dobermans, unfortunately. I would listen to the advice you've been given above. Tayoh is my only dog, but I know I wouldn't, and couldn't, bring another male home. He's fine when he's out in public, fine around neutered dogs.. the only time I've ever had a problem with him was when he saw another un neutered male doberman. Ears forward, fixating on the other dog. We left before anything could happen. 

xzmoorex's picture
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Joined: 2012-10-31

thanks Dj's dad, i feel more confident now. at first i was like this is bound to fail. Now i feel like i have a bit of a upper hand on the situation. I really want it to work out so i am going to try hard! he has his head in my lap as im typing right now hahaha he is the coolest dog i have had!

tess's picture
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Joined: 2012-01-28

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I can weigh in on this male/male agression issue. I have been very fortunate. I currently have a male dobe pup, Axel, who is 6 months old and between my son and myself we have 6 other dogs and two are male. I say between the two of us because Axel alternates between our households.
We live close bye. He gets along great with everyone and vice/versa and we are very conscience of the possibility of this occuring. Luckily the other male dogs in this mix are very submissive and so is Axel. So this is why I think this is going to work out for me. I should also say that Axel is my second Dobe. My first one, Diesel, was also a male and NEVER had any of the male/male agression issues. In fact his best friend was my sons male labrador. In fact the lab is also Axel's best friend. I guess its just something you are going to have to watch and pray for the best. I have been lucky and I hope you are too. Keep us posted.


Tess

xzmoorex's picture
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Joined: 2012-10-31

Yeah, i talked to my vet today when i took Dobie in for his first check up and he was so happy to see a dobe because no one really has them around us and he told me all sorts of stories about his! We had a good chat about the male aggression and he knows our other dog very well and he said he thinks everything will work out just to keep an eye out as time passes! P.S. Dobie is healthy and is scheduled for shots and all! 

Kar-jinx's picture
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Joined: 2012-04-15

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I have a male dobe about 1 and a half, and a male min pin 6 years.  We make sure one  or both are cated when we go out.  I don't want to come home to.......well we all know which dog is going to lose here.  Especially since our dobe is a large boy.  We got lucky that we have a dobe that likes cats, dogs, horses, exotic birds, & people.  Hopefully his social back ground will help.  But you wonder if they were left alone, what might happen.  Maybe nothing, maybe something.  Take extra care and as I do, make sure at least one is crated while you are out doing errands.

xzmoorex's picture
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Joined: 2012-10-31

yeah you make a good point! We ALWAYS crate them when we leave just because there isnt enough trust yet to let them loose, and now with new circumstances coming into play they will be crated no matter what! I want us all to coexsist and have a good life as a family! We are happy now and want to continue to be so we are going to strive towards that goal and do anything we need to! thanks to everyone who has chimed in! It's really much appreciated, its good to have somewhere to go and ask questions!

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

XZ - I have adopted an older Rottweiler he was 7 when we got him he is now 8 going on 9 when we got him we had two male dogs a collie and a chihuahua the collie died shortly after adopting the rottie leaving the Biggest and the Littlest together hahahaa, now the rottie seems to be more dog oriented than the doberman and he lives with a bunch of cats - that said - I always supervise him with the small animals, first off he is clumsy and never looks at his own feet for any reason while he walks he just bull dozes his way through and anyone under his feet just gets kicked along without concern, also the chihuahua who showed NO signs of any domineering behavior with the collie, because the collie could care less who's the BIG dog, but now Ben has some hidden domineering traits, I always felt he had them and everyone would tell me, no.....but I sensed he could and would in the right instance show those domination traits and I was right, it first showed with the male cat, who LOVES dogs and this cat would stand on his hind feet and head butt Ben in the mouth, the cat used to do this to the collie and the collie would then lay down and love on the cat but Ben refuses to show any interest in this cat so the cat continues to head butt Ben's face and Ben grumbles, at the first indication of a grumble I have to move quickly just to be on the safe side, if Ben is in his bed in another room all I have to go on is the grumble - which means you have to listen at all times for that indication, you must have acute hearing over tv, radios, voices etc. to keep everyone safe at all times; when I hear the grumble I have to remove the cat - I have taught Ben to tolerate the cat doing this head butt action until I can get the cat to move on; thank goodness Ben trusts me to get the cat away from him, he even gets up out of his bed down the hall to come to the living room with the cat racing after him to sit in front of me as if to say "mom get that cat away from me"  - I taught him to tolerate the cat doing this by sitting in the floor petting Ben as the cat got close to him and then when the cat touched him I would praise him for ignoring the cat and I kept that up until he could handle the cat for a minute or two before grumbling - NOW the chihuahua has taken to walking over to ben while he is chewing on his bone or just laying on his bed and the stance that the chi gets into is - very erect body, ears up, head turned just a bit away but looking out the corner of his eyes at Ben, I instantly see that body go stiff and I call him away from Ben, if I am busy and miss it I hear Ben grumble and look and there is that dang chi about to stand with his front feet on Ben's shoulders, now Ben will allow him to do this but I WILL NOT tolerate it, even though Ben will let him make the move and stand on his shoulders ben grumbles - some people might just let it go but this is not acceptable, if the chi does this again he is called off but the third attempt and the chi goes into his crate for time out and Ben learns that I will take charge and he doesn't have to protect himself. But you HAVE to catch it when that little dog goes into an erect, stiff body position - I mention all this because we had the chihuahua for 7 years before Ben and NEVER did he show any signs of dominating the collie, but Ben brought out some need in the chi to show Ben who was top dog so watch your dachie because he may not have shown any signs of domination behavior but the dobie may bring it out. Be careful and always crate when not in your presence. We ALWAYS crate Ben and the chi when out, just in case Ben accidentally gets out of his crate we still want the chihuahua safe. Crating both is the only way to keep them both safe in case of accidental crate failure.

Sorry for the long post....but thought you might need to hear about the lack of little dog domination and then see it go to domination quickly in the same dog just with the addition of another dog.......