Just a little bit of guidance

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Kellymcf's picture
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Joined: 2014-11-14

Hi.  i am the owner of a very boisterous 13 week old female Doberman puppy and a very laid back and loveable 4 year old male black lab.

I have a few questions

Our Dobe is doing very well, she can sit wait, lie down and Im working on leave it.  She still doesnt seem to have got the grips with potty training and Im saying no when she does it then taking her outside and trying to break her will as far as her crate is concerned is a struggle as she is so stuborn.  Shes has now taken to jumping up on our couch (we dont allow our black lab to do this) she keeps doing it - even though I keep say off - Do I just keep repeating this?

 

My main concern is my black lab seems to be getting less and less tolerant.  Our Dobe is relentless and full of energy always jumping all over him wanting to play.  My lab very seldom barks but he has started barking at her and sometimes holding her throat until she wimpers.  He is a lovely laid back boy and I didnt think he would be like this.  I dont want any aggression to escalate between them - how can I stop this?  Should I teach them to 'break' if they are getting too rough?? How do I do that? He seems to want to play with her biut only when he wants too.  Our dobe wants to be with him all the time and during the day they do sleep together. (at night our dobe is crated in the kitchen and our lab has a bed in the kitchen as well.

 

Our Dobe hasnt had her full vaccinations yet so I am hoping that once I can get them both outside to the parks/beach etc this behavious would stop?? What do you think? Also once I start walking my Dobe how much exercise should she get a day and how much should I increase it by per week/month etc.

Sorry for all the questions I have had a gsd before but not a doberman or two dogs together either - I just want to get this right and ensure that they are both happy. Help!!!

Oz Dobe's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-24

Hi Kellymcf. 13wks is too soon IMHO to have a dobe in the house without some serious supervision. My girl is 19mo and she is only now allowed access to our living space but still needs to be supervised. We did work with her during that time and when she displayed behavior we didnt want, we put her back in her gated hallway, knowing she wasnt ready for the house yet.

I'm always filled with dread when I hear about ppl 'breaking their dogs will'. Can you explain what you mean by that and how exactly you are doing it. Dobermans are supersensitive and 'breaking their will' will often break their temprament. Dogs arent stubborn, you just havent found away to communicate effectively yet. They do not deliberately set out to give you a hard time or try to 'dominate' you. Toilet training for all dogs is the same, take them outside at regular intervals, and praise and treat when they go. Pretty straight forward. No need to 'break their will'. The only time a dog will 'dominate' a human, is if the human leaves a void which the dog reluctantly will fill because thats the way dogs work.

Your poor lab is trying to tell you that he needs space. Give it to him. Find a way to seperate them and give them both some space. This is pretty normal for any puppy, to want to play with a new friend. Your lab will not only resent the puppy if this keeps up, but will resent you as a leader for not keeping the pack straight. If you dont stop your puppy annoying your lab, your lab will. Which would you prefer?

As your puppy matures, and is better exercised and socialised, and as you show your lab that you have things in hand, the situation should improve.

Dobes need constant training, and regular exercise at every stage of their lives. If they arent getting it, that energy will spill over all over the place.

No need to break anyones will, just show them both that you are taking care of business and your situation should improve.

Kellymcf's picture
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Joined: 2014-11-14

 

Hello and thanks for your comments. Breaking her will was perhaps the wrong wording. I'm talking about her crying when she gets put into her crate at night to sleep. She is getting better and the whining and crying is getting less and less. I'm now giving her her food in the crate, giving her my top at night and having a ticking clock at night which all seems to help. Her her training is coming on well and we go to puppy socialisation classes at the local vets until she is full vaccinated and I will be taking her to dog training classes.  I never leave the two dogs on their own together so they are constantly supervised I'm just not sure when to intervene if things are getting rough or to let my lab tell her he has had enough???

 

 

 

 

Kellymcf's picture
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Joined: 2014-11-14

I'm not trying to break her will at all for potty training I know that takes time. I was referring to her whining and crying at night when being put to bed. I've spoken to a dog breeder who said to ignore her to break her will.  Am I approachibg that in the wrong way? Once she is in the crate I don't go back to her and the time it is taking her to settle is less and less

Oz Dobe's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-24

I would train the pup to 'out' when your lab growls. Its something that will help her in the future with strange dogs anyway. Eventually she will probably associate the growling to the out command and she will know to move away on her own.

I get between what I dont want Storm getting into, ie a rubbish bin, the kids with food, or basicly anything that would entice her to come 'in'. I use my body to push her away without touching her by blocking her movement toward the unwanted target, and saying 'out' and usually add a 'git' in there for good measure also. Body blocking works best if you dont actually touch the dog, but occupy the space they are trying to move into. In the beginning, pups being smaller and faster, it took more effort to do this, but as she has gotten bigger, and I can anticipate her movements better, it has become alot easier. If she doesnt listen at first, you can gently grab her collar to move her 'out', but as soon as you can, lighten the tension on the collar until touching her is not required.

This has translated very well at the dog park. Storm sometimes tries to be the policeman/woman by getting into the fray when other dogs get a little boistrous with each other. I am able to tell her 'ahh' and 'out' with some urgings such as 'go on, git' and she responds by moving away from the agitated pack. Dogs respond well to body language so I also make pushing motions in the direction I want her to go. I dont touch her, I'm actually away from her, but she knows what I mean now and will break away and as a reward I will play with her. I dont scream the command I just give it firmly and I always always always follow through. The minute you let them 'in' on an 'out' command, you give the gambler his/her jackpot and that will keep them playing.

Of course when she outs correctly she needs lots of praise and play and whatever else makes her happy. Your asking her to move away from what makes her happy, so she needs to be 'paid' accordingly.

 

Oz Dobe's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-24

Lol we are cross posting. The wonders of the interweb eh :)

I agree with the breeder but not their reasoning. Ignoring a puppy crying in a crate is cool. I would add rewarding her for being quiet in her crate is cool too. Crate training is best assisted by putting her in a crate over short periods during the day, gradually lengthening them over time. The fact that she is settling better and better, tells you that the method is working. If she's not otherwise stressed and is settling better each night, I would continue doing what your doing, but maybe put in some day time practice too.

At her age I would let her out of her crate during the night to try toileting. She will reluctantly pee where she sleeps (the whole reasoning behind crate training) but if you take her from the crate straight outside, her chances of toileting are hugely increased. This needs to be done on a regular basis until she is able to do this on her own regularly. Crating and removing her from the crate during the night to take her outside should help with toilet training.

Kellymcf's picture
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Joined: 2014-11-14

 

 

Thanks for all your comments.

I have started to put her in her crate when I'm busy in the kitchen(that's where her crate is) and going in and out the kitchen as well. I also don't let her out unless she sits and waits. She's getting there. I'm home all day with them and I managed to get them both to sit and  wait outside the living room door whilst I sprayed carpet freshener. My only concern about taking her out to toilet is she won't settle again. The crate has been dry for the last two nights??

 

I will practice the out command you mentioned but will maybe change the word to away as we use going out to let her know we are going outside to toilet and play in the garden etc. thanks again for your help