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mfulton7's picture
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Joined: 2013-09-21

My dobie Gemma is 10 weeks. Today I was trying to look at her ears, we just got them cropped
Monday, she kept wiggling so I forced her down and she started growling at me. I then put her on her back like we had done with our other dogs when they were puppies and she started growling louder. I looked into her eyes with an intimidating stare (ha ha) and she quieted. This is completely out of characteristic for Gemma therefore I was caught completely off guard and wasnt sure how to react. Is this normal behavior for her?

bluedog7's picture
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Joined: 2013-05-02

She is a baby. She was grumbling much like she would if her siblings were buggy her. Say uh, uh to her or grunt or whatever to distract her. I say "ACH or Tschh" like Cesar Milan does and it does work. She is just testing her human to see what she can get away with much like a human baby.


Oh and patience...patience...patience until she is at least...2 years old!

 

All my Dobes have been talkers and groaners...it is just a funny personality trait that I find endearing but it can be a surprise to new Dobie parents.

 

I would not recommend the dominance thing...she is too young for that. If you have to force a dog to lie down...don't do it! It can cause her to fear having her ears messed with... Instead go slow and slowly rub her ears, give her a treat while you are doing it to distract her and she will learn having her ears handled is a good thing.

mfulton7's picture
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Joined: 2013-09-21

Really?! I did not know that they were grumblers that is great information. Thanks! Good point about the dominance thing. I hadn't even tried that with her until today. I had thought about it but it just didn't seem like a right fit for this breed, if that makes sense. Just like earlier I was playing with her with a rope thing and she bit me I know she didn't mean it but not thinking at first I said no and she dropped the rope. Right after I thought great I probably confused her. I think we definitely need a longer rope and then problem will be solved :)

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

And from what I have read here you don't put the doberman on it's back to dominate, that is old school and doesn't work with dobes.

lots of people have different experiences but i would not do that to my dog much less my puppy. Rolling over should be fun and for belly rubs not for domination. You can be in control of your dog without that.....

leslieak's picture
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Joined: 2013-06-18

Pet Profiles

I never really understood why people think rolling on the back somehow fixes dominance issues. I actually think that Argo's old owner may have done that to him and he is absolutely freaked out if you try to roll him over, to the point that he could hurt himself. And I don't have any real dominance issues with him (except maybe with weak attempts with visitors because I think he would like to may sure he doesn't fall down farther in the pecking order - one of the cats has just risen above him so now he is in fourth place out of five - haha). I want to teach him to roll over as a trick and when I started I realized that he has had some bad experience with it. We are working on it but it is sad that an otherwise easy to deal with dog is terrified if you try to roll him over. I think consistently setting boundaries and sticking to them seems a lot more logical way to display dominance than flipping a dog over. I guess I am ranting a little because I see this mentioned on the forum quite often.

The grumbling and vocalness is so funny. Argo is constantly grmmmphing and I swear now I am starting to do it subconsciously. It is really funny to have him making noises all the time. The other thing you may want to be prepared for is the air snapping. At least with Argo, it is not agressive at all but a playful thing but I had never seen another breed of dog do it when not actually trying to bite. They are definitely a fun breed to figure out.

Kim
Kim's picture
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Joined: 2012-02-05

Every single one of my Dobes grumbled every time I tried to hug them.

"Oh, mother....MUST YOU???"

mfulton7's picture
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Joined: 2013-09-21

She has been doing more grumbling. When she wants to play with the other dogs its quite funny.

And Im definitely not putting her on her back again. It just doesnt seem very nice plus shes such a fast learner that I dont think anything like that would be necessary. Thanks for all the advice everyone :)

redfeet's picture
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Joined: 2013-09-03

She might felt uncomfortable on that position plus might feel something on her ears that makes her defensive. She's still young..

KevinK's picture
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Joined: 2010-07-15

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Many dobermans are vocal, and trying to explain how growling should be understood is kind of difficult when taken out of context.  People usually assume growling is vicious behavior, and it's often not the case.  However, it's up to you to decide what you want to allow and what you don't.  If I'm playing a rough game with Dakota, I don't mind her getting vocal.  If I tell her to sit for a treat, and she were to growl in protest, well, that's a different story :-)