crate traing or house breaking

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lenaMlee's picture
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Joined: 2013-01-22

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hi my name is lena I'm a first time doberman owner .I have a seven week old red and rust doberman female puppy and i wanted to know what some help tips on how to house break your puppy,and my boyfirend have an dog thats 18mo he really playful , but sometime he can be a little to playful (rough) with her is it ok to let them coutinue to play or wait until she get a little older.

Echo's Dad's picture
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Joined: 2013-01-10

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Congrats on your new family member!

Crate training vs house breaking is more a preference based on your situation, but in either case it is highly recommended to conduct house breaking training anyway, as a puppy turns into a dog you really don't want them messing in yours or someone elses house.  It's very easy to house break a Dobie if your are vigilant and consistent.  Puppy pads, get them to use them and then slowly move them closer to the outside door each day, when the puppy gets to the door say "outside" in a fun baby-talk type voice and let the puppy outside.  Praise highly and treat when the puppy does their business outside.

Another option is to make sure you know their potty signs and when the puppy exhibits those signs pick up or lead them to the door, say outside and praise/treat.  Never scold the puppy when messing in the house unless they are already house broken, as this can cause the puppy to start "eating" the evidence when they make a mistake, also doesn't do anything positive for their development.  If they are housebroken and understand "no" then use that when they are caught in the act.  After the fact is too late.

I have used both methods successfully.

Don't stop the play, however, supervise each play, when it gets rough, stop the play and tell the older dog "no" in a loud voice or for better effect use a "growling" word such as, "WROOOOOOOOONGGGGG."  Dogs understand this very well as a reprimand from the Alpha.  Then let them continue to play, eventually the dogs will learn to play without getting one or the other hurt.  It's the same principle as teaching a dog or puppy to play nicely with children.

Best of luck with your new puppy.

Echo's Dad's picture
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Almnost forgot - a quick addition to the above, general rule of thumb is 1 hour per month of age for crating and up to 8 hours for an adult dog.  Best not exceed 8 hours of crating as this can be detrimental to the dogs health and cause behavioral problems.  Dobermans are very easily bored and require not only physical but also mental stimulation, neither of which you can get in a crate.

lenaMlee's picture
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Joined: 2013-01-22

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thank u I'm going to try it Now i have another question my bella, she just started useing the pad most of the time when it come to pee but when she poop she goes anywhere , and when i catch her and the act i put her on the on pad so she continue with her poop on the pad and hopefully she catch on and start doing on her own well now i notice she hold until i leave and than she still go on the floor. did i do some wrong to her mentally or this something puppie do

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I have read here that it's best to keep your puppy tethered to your own body  when they are doing things you don't want inside and with puppies it is necessary to run outside frequently this way your dog is not "out of sight" to do anything you don't want whether that is potty in the house or eating things they shouldn't just keep a leash on them and teach her to go outside and not in the house, usually allowing one to go in the house just means "you can go in the house" the house is also where she lives not just her crate and she should not be allowed to soil her "home" in my opinion she should be taught outside is where she goes, at this rate you will have to train her again to not go on the pads which is where you trained her to go originally which could be confusing to her to since you would be changing the rules - so best to just teach them where you want them to go when they are adults....I assume you don't want your adult dog to go in the house on pads??? if not work on just keeping close eye on your dog, in/out frequently and lots of praise when they do the necessary business outside and do away with the pads.....puppies need to pee/poop constantly they are little people with little bladders and their food moves quickly through their systems this means that when she wakes up she immediately goes out, when she eats she immediately goes out, when she plays she needs to go out every 20-30minutes at this young age, 7 weeks is very young for you to have gotten her, any exercise will stimulate her system to rid itself of solid or liquid waste, keep her with you so you can see those tiny signs of stress like watching you intently, whining, circling, looking for something that is not there, searching, sitting and standing stitting and standing those are all signs of "gotta go" run your puppy outside regulary and praise praise praise for doing it outside, don't react to the mistakes those are your fault for not recognizing she needed to go out or for not automatically having had her out already in case you haven't figured it out yet, when you have a baby you will just have time to sit down and focus on something when you will need to then jump up and go outside you will get your exercise with the up/down of taking her out, and once you take her out if she continues to play remember to interrupt play to run outside cause she will just squat where she is at, and even the tiniest of naps requires an immediate trip outside when she wakes up............that's my opinion.....

katedavis's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-09

In my opinion you don't need to stop play but yes when it's start getting rough you stop the elder one. Keep the dog in a safe place when you are not home or are asleep. A crate just large enough that he can lie down and stand fully erect is usually ideal for this. A small room with a baby-gate rather than a closed door will also work, provided this safe place is a place where the particular dog will not use the bathroom. You are trying to help the dog develop control. There are many Puppy Training sites on Internet.

I would suggest you to read some articles on this site, they have very good tips & training ideas.

Rob_103's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-18

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I just got my first Doberman for Valentine’s Day. His name is Bruce and is 6 weeks and 5 days old. I know you should wait until they are 8 weeks old but I have him now. He was weaned off the mother at 5 weeks and has been eating solid food just fine. That was a little background.

I wanted to know what an acceptable age to crate train him is. I read that I shouldn't keep him in for more than two hours while he is young but it didn't specify what age to start. I have him going outside to poop and pee every time he wakes up and right after eating he is starting to understand to use the pee pads and when he is out to poop. I tried putting him in the crate but he cries a lot I'm not sure if it’s because he is still too young or just trying to get my attention. Please let me know if it’s ok to start now and what would be a good way to approach it. Thank.

Last note my wife is staying at home with my son and him so he will never be alone.

-Rob

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I would crate train now, the younger the better, a baby will get a good feel for his crate and learn to love it easier especially if he is trained that it is a great place to hang out, when he is supervised place his toys in there and let him go in to sleep but never leave a puppy alone with toys in a crate as they can become a choking hazard.....when he is playing, throw his toys in there to retrieve that sort of thing so he sees it as a fun place.....at night I would place him in his crate with no toys, and you can place a blanket over the crate except the door/gate portion so you can keep a check on him to make sure he doesn't need help.....he should not be left alone in the crate for very long for certain especially at this age cause he needs to pee frequently with such a tiny tiny bladder....and you don't want him to learn bad habits like peeing in his crate.....he is lonely, he is way too young to be away from his mom and siblings so he is crying for them, crying for your attention since they aren't there, and because it is something new to him.....lots of reasons....don't humor him and give him attention for crying, but remember he is a tiny thing and needs lots of attention to feel secure right now.....right now you want to shower him with love and affection (but not for doing unacceptable things), he needs the security of family since he has lost his way too soon......that's my take....

Katedjoy's picture
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I have a 5 month old girl Dobie who does pretty well not going in the house, yet she pees in her crate at night. I thought they didn't go where they sleep? Is it just like bed wetting? The vet said not to worry until 7 months and if she's still doing it then, will need to do something. Any advice would be greatly appreciated 

talisin's picture
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you may need to make a point to take her out in the night until her bladder muscles mature....don't assume she can hold it, assume you have to make sure she has a clean crate, set a clock to wake you halfway through her time during the night and take her out, it's a pain but it will be worth it in the end, it only takes a bit of your time.....it is necessary 7 hours is a long time for a small bladder......so at 3 1/2 hours into that 7 take her out....

LSUfan1988's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-02

Im going through this phase with Les. Hes veary smart and picks up quick. And one thing he knows is he hates the snow, and weve had a pretty good bit lately. So ill see him sniffing and Ill lead him to the back door and he will follow willingly until I say lets go out. Then he squats, pees, and takes off through the house haha. Its really something to see. But weve had some nice weather comming in so hopefully it gets easier.