Buddy's Brother

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Buddys_ Mama's picture
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My husband met Buddy's brother and his 'Mommy' at the pet store last night. It turns out that they live so close to us, her daughter is in my youngest daughter's class! He is a big boy at 45lbs and DH says he is taller than our boy.

When he was leaving, she gave him her phone number and said that we should get together for a play date. DH is all for it, I however, am a little leary about it.  I don't want him to get hurt because he will be the smaller of the two. I have no idea how to teach Buddy to approach other dogs and his natural approach is to jump in circles and act like a lunatic. What would be your advice on how to broach this? I would love for him to have a relationship with his brother but not sure what to do...

 

Thanx in advance,

Mama

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Just to add to this... I know there have been many warnings regarding male/male dominance... thinking that I should just stay away knowing that fact.

Roreh's picture
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Same sex aggression is typically for dogs who are living together. Also with the boys being so young they don't have that drive for dominance just yet. I think this is a great oppertunity for your boy to go out and get socialized. Supervised play in a positive enviornment will build his confidence and allow him to gain manners with other dogs. I wouldn't worry too much about the size difference with getting hurt.. pups are so awkward and uncoordinated they really can't do much harm to one another lol.

I honestly think you hit the jackpot!! 

If you do decide to go forth please take pics and update on the play date :) 

DJ's Dad's picture
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Sounds like a great opportunity to me, too.  Just watch them both for body language that might let you know it's time to stop playing.  Rough housing is what they do best when they're young, though, and they will probably both enjoy getting rid of some dober-energy.

PICTURES ARE MANDATORY!!!

chrismg's picture
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I have never had any problem with Charlie or Gabby with other dogs.  We go to a dog park once a week and they both have a blast!  I know some people on here do not think too highly of dog parks, but the one I go to in Raleigh, NC is great, everyone keeps an eye on their dog.  Charlie has been going since he was 5 months old and never had a problem.

HarleyBear's picture
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I think this sounds fun and wonderful.  Just keep an eye on them.  Sometimes, when Harley was really young he would get too excited at puppy socials (all sized puppies) and he needed a time-out to relax.  So be there to watch body language.

Have fun!

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Please tell me what body language is a no-no so I can keep an eye out... I feel so much better that I asked you guys because it really put my mind at ease. I will definately post pics of the boys!

Mama

tess's picture
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Good luck with the playdate.  Just relax and let them play.  If you think they are getting too rough like pulling each others collars, dragging each other by the neck...stuff like that then seperate them and redirect their play. They will not hurt each other and the play time will be both valuable for them as well as you. Again pictures are mandatory.

 

Tess

Lady Kate's picture
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Hi Buddy's_Mom

I cut and pasted this from:

About.com dogs.. sounds about right to me...

Reading Your Dog's Body Language Understanding Canine Communication

By Jenna Stregowski, RVT, About.com Guide

Knowing how to read your dog's body language is the key to understanding your dog, assessing her attitude, and predicting her next move. Because dogs are non-verbal - their body language does the talking for them. Vocalization actually takes second place to a dog's body language. Once you learn these basic types of dog body language, spend some time observing dogs interacting with people and other animals in various situations. Understanding of dog body language can also help protect you and your dog from dangerous situations as well as aid in training or identification of common behavior problems.
Confident

The confident dog stands straight and tall with her head held high, ears perked up, and eyes bright. Her mouth may be slightly open but is relaxed. Her tail may sway gently, curl loosely or hang in a relaxed position. She is friendly, non-threatening and at ease with her surroundings.

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Happy

A happy dog will show the same signs as a confident dog. In addition, she will usually wag her tail and sometimes hold her mouth open more or even pant mildly. She appears even more friendly and content than the confident dog, with no signs of anxiety.

Playful

A playful dog is happy and excited. Her ears are up, eyes are bright, and tail wags rapidly. She may jump and run around with glee. Often, a playful dog will exhibit the play bow: front legs stretched forward, head straight ahead, rear end up in the air and possibly wiggling. This is most certainly an invitation to play!

Submissive

A submissive dog holds her head down, ears down flat and averts her eyes. Her tail is low and may sway slightly, but is not tucked. She may roll on her back and expose her belly. A submissive dog may also also nuzzle or lick the other dog or person to further display passive intent. Sometimes, she will sniff the ground or otherwise divert her attention to show that she does not want to cause any trouble. A submissive dog is meek, gentle and non-threatening.

Anxious

The anxious dog may act somewhat submissive, but often holds her ears partially back and her neck stretched out. She stands in a very tense posture and sometimes shudders. Often, an anxious dog whimpers, moans, yawns and/or licks her lips. Her tail is low and may be tucked. She may show the whites of her eyes, something called whale eye An anxious dog may overreact to stimulus and can become fearful or even aggressive. If you are familiar with the dog, you may try to divert her attention to something more pleasant. However, be cautious - do not provoke her or try to soothe her.

Fearful

The fearful dog combines submissive and anxious attitudes with more extreme signals. She stands tense, but is very low to the ground. Her ears are flat back and her eyes are narrowed and averted. Her tail is between her legs and she typically trembles. A fearful dog often whines or growls and might even bare her teeth in defense. She may also urinate or defecate. A fearful dog can turn aggressive quickly if she senses a threat. Do not try to reassure the anxious dog, but remove yourself from the situation calmly. If you are the owner, be confident and strong, but do not comfort or punish your dog. Try to move her to a less threatening, more familiar location.

Dominant

A dominant dog will try to assert herself over other dogs and sometimes people. She stands tall and confident and may lean a bit forward. Her eyes are wide and she makes direct eye contact with the other dog or person. Her ears are up and alert, and the hair on her back may stand on edge. She may growl lowly. Her demeanor appears less friendly and possibly threatening. If the behavior is directed at dog that submits, there is little concern. If the other dog also tries to be dominant, a fight may break out. A dog that directs dominant behavior towards people can pose a serious threat. Do not make eye contact and slowly try to leave. If your dog exhibits this behavior towards people, behavior modification is necessary.

Aggressive

An aggressive dog goes far beyond dominant. All feet are firmly planted on the ground in a territorial manner, and she may lunge forward. Her ears are pinned back, head is straight ahead, and eyes are narrowed but piercing. Her tail is straight, held up high, and may even be wagging. She bares her teeth, snaps her jaw and growls or barks threateningly. The hairs along her back stand on edge. If you are near a dog showing these signs it is very important to get away carefully. Do not run. Do not make eye contact with the dog. Do not show fear. Slowly back away to safety. If your own dog becomes aggressive, seek the assistance of a professional dog trainer to learn the proper way to correct the behavior. Dogs with aggressive behavior should never be used for breeding.

Kar-jinx's picture
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What we do is go for a walk first and space the dogs one ahead of the other.  Then the rear dog leads for a bit.  This way they both get to smell each other's scent.  Then we start narrowing the gap until they are walking side by side as though they were in a pack.  You might find this method will alleviate the fears you have.  If you aren't displaying confidence and are acting fearful, both dogs may pick up on it and act accordingly.  Once the dogs are walking together, and it appears they are getting along, you should be fairly safe to let them romp inside a fenced yard.  I sometimes leave a short leash dangling on them for a bit so I have something to grab if I need to separate them.  If all goes well,  you can remove the leashes and let them play.

DJ's Dad's picture
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As long as they can play and one of them does't insist on ALWAYS being the dominant one with growling entering into the play, they should be ok.  Most dogs like to run, chase each other, body slam each other, even do a little bit of mouthing on each other, but you'll be able to tell by watching them if they are playing or if it's starting to get too serious.

HarleyBear's picture
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^^^Exactly.  Puppy socials taught Harley a lot about not getting too serious and how to play appropriately.  

Buddys_ Mama's picture
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Well, after the horrendous weather and power outtages ceased to be an issue, we finally got together on Saturday with King and his family! At first it was a bit rough as King is about 10-15lbs heavier than Buddy and pretty much runs the house, lol. We came into a situation with a very excited King who very obviously wanted to play but Buddy who has never experienced off-leash play, was nervous at first.

King ran at him and chased him through the house! Cornering Buddy and jumping on top of him. At one point Buddy was hiding behind me so I put myself between the two (I know, not the smartest thing to do but he was relentless and wasn't giving my boy a break) and calmed King as best I could. King's mom's attitude is, "it's what they do..." but I'd like to know what she'd say if it were her baby getting trampled. Either way, it gave Buddy a chance to catch his breath and compose himself. After that, Buddy had had enough of the pushing down and neck biting so he gave King a good nip on the ear which clearly sent the message. King gave out a "yipe" and then played nice, even giving Buddy the upper hand and not trying be on top the whole entire time.

By the end of the play date, they were playing beautifully! It was really great!

Please click the following link for photos of our day together.

http://s163.beta.photobucket.com/user/mamaantonelle/story/4317


Enjoy!

Mama & Buddy

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I tried several times and don't see anything am I the only one??

Kar-jinx's picture
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I can see the pictures.  They look like they were having a wonderful time.  

talisin's picture
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Karjinx well of course you can see the pictures, :P hahahahaha it's just me apparently.....