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steph05's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-19

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I'm not sure if anyone else does this but I would like to be able to tell Rosco to go to his bed and laydown. Family dinners, visitors ect I just think it's a great tool...but I'm not sure how to train him to do that and keep it fun, I want him to be happy to go lay down on his bed.

Any suggestions? 

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I taught my whippet to stay in the kitchen while we ate in the dining room, he knew he was to not cross the line of the tile to the hardwood in the DR.....now if can just remember how I taught him to do that, hahahaaha.....

I remember eating blueberry muffins and he barked at me while he was sitting at the table while I ate, I immediately got up and took his collar and gently talked him and walked him into the kitchen, as I turned to walk back of course he started to follow me and I stopped and pointed my finger and said sternly NO, he stopped and stared at me like "what?" and we did it again, when he finally stopped and stood where I wanted him too, I said "good boy" then I did the hand signal for him to stay and went into the dining room, the blueberry muffins were too much temptation so he crossed the threshold into the dining room, I stood up and pointed to the kitchen and said "go" and walked that direction and he backed up to the kitchen as soon as he crossed back over the threshold I went back to the table, we kept this up until he figured it out. However, being the smarty he was he would test me and lay there and then inch crawling forward till his front feet were in the dining room and I would point at his feet and say "get back" and he would scoot back then he would scoot forward we kept that up until finally he months later he would pick on me periodically and just stick his front feet over the line just to get attention and I would look at him and point and say "where are your feet???" and he would literally look at his front feet and then at me and back up, he was way too smart for his own good......

I usually just train my dogs the way I would a child and it works for me I am always amazed at the methods that people here use and think oh that's how you work with a dog hahahaha, but I get my dogs to understand what I want just by using body touch and words at the same time, like back up, very useful command, I would use my leg and touch their chest and push slightly backwards and say "backup" and when they did I would say "thank you" I always say thank you to my animals for doing the right thing, it's just the southern way, hahahaah, but they learn quickly......and snapping my finger works like a clicker and they have all learned the snap/finger movement and know what it means for each command.....and I use raised eyebrows; I tilt my head down and use my head to point and they know what to do; I can look over my shoulder and they know, I must be very consistent without realizing it with my body language cause they catch on very quickly.....a dog trainer might find it amazing that my methods work....but it works....

steph05's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-19

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Too funny about the blueberry muffin, I think I would have been crossign the line as well. That's always what I did with my last puppy, it got to a point where I just have to look at him a certain way and he would know "Oh shit what did I do?" 

They really read into things so much, sometimes more than people think. My duck toller knew he wasn't supposed to look at me when I was eating food so soemtiems I would catch him watching me and I would look at him and he would turn him head quick in another direction and look around like he was watching something else. It was too funny, I had to try so hard not to laugh. 

Thanks for the post Tali, made me laugh :) 

bosskey's picture
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Joined: 2011-09-08

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We trained Boss and Daisy to "place" when we have guests, eating or whenever we just need them to calm down from coming inside and chasing eachother all over the place. We have two large mesh, cot like beds one is in the living room and the other is in the dining room (so of course their always with us). While we worked with them on "place" we constantly took them to their mat and praised with treats once they listened. If they got off we marched them back over and told them to Place again. Once were finished with dinner, or whatever were doing we used "release" to know its time to run around and play again. Was my favorite peice of training!:) Hope this helps!

Lady Kate's picture
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Joined: 2009-10-28

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They are so easy to train..... when they're in the mood to learn.

There's a constant battle with our sofa.. It's pretty big and Sofia has her own 'spot' ( envision Sheldon Cooper on the Big Bang Theory)

She'll oootch her way over to the middle and all I have to say is.. " On your side," she will immediately curl herself around and place her royal self on 'her spot'.. but not without, I  might add, a huge 'hmmmmph' and a stink eye.

I will always tell her "GOOD GIRL. Good, your side!"  I doubt if she understands 'good your side' but it works here.

We do talk to Sofia like a person and I know there are many words she totally understands./ She does have selective hearing ( I've noticed that many times) but rarely do we give a command more than once ( well maybe twice..) and then just wait till she  uuuuh.. preforms.

The only suggestion I have is to be persistant and consistant.. If you give Rosco a little treat when he does go to his bed... that might entice him to be happy to go there even if you have company...

Good luck

Tannaidhe's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-25

Someone else on the forum recommended the book, The Power of Positive Dog Training, for help with training.

It has a section on how to get them to go in their kennel on command, and to enjoy being in there. Well worth getting and reading, even if you don't follow every word in it.

Echo's Dad's picture
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Joined: 2013-01-10

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Trained my last doberman to do this using the command "go to your room."  Trained by leading him on leash to room saying the command, walking him to his bed and gently pushing him to lay down in his bed, then I rewarded, played with him and repeated.  Took about 3 or 4 weeks until he did it by himself.  I always made it a positve experience, never yelled and never used any other commands, such as lay down or sit.  I wanted him to learn "go to your room" and what that meant.

3 or so weeks and he would go to his room off leash.  Then I had to teach him that he was supposed to stay there for awhile and not just go to his room, lay down on his bed, sigh and then get back up and join the family.  I did this by waiting outside the door and when he peeked out I would say "no" and repeat the command to go to your room.  Another week or two of having him stay in his room for at least 10 to 15 minutes and then I would go in and say "release" which he new as the command that releases him from whatever current command was in force.  After a total of roughly 2 months, my boy would go to his room and stay there until he was give the release command.

Hope this helps.