Is 7 months too old?

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osofs's picture
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Joined: 2015-10-12

I've been looking for a pup for the last 6 months and finally found one, the only doubt i have is that he is almost 7 months old.
I am not experienced with dobermans and i am afraid it will be hard to train or bond with him since I didn't meet him when he was 8-10 weeks which is the age I've read is best to bring a puppy home.

Please any advice will be very useful.

And sorry for my English, is not my native language.

AresMyDobie's picture
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Joined: 2015-02-28

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I don't think it is to old to bond. Training, patients, consistency and love is all it takes to have a good dog. These guys love to work so training is a huge bonding experience for the both of you.

ljmadd's picture
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We just adopted ours at 8mos.  He has become our 'velcro' dog to be sure - follows us around the house and will search for us if we go out of sight - not all the time but quite alot.  He is now really testing us though!

 

AresMyDobie's picture
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^^ hang in there and stay consistent the challenging will stop just be on top of things :)

Lady Kate's picture
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Absolutely NOT too old.. many of us have adopted or rescued older ( even senior) Dobermans.. They do wonderfully..
It will take a little while until they know for sure that you're not going anywhere and that they're safe and secure.. maybe up to six weeks.. Lots of patience.. tons of love and consistency..
i would however, suggest you do a lot of research on the breed to be sure it's the right fit for you.

They are not to be left alone for long periods of time.. they need to be in the house.. never take your eyes off them when outside.. They require a lot of exercise and mental stimulation...I see that you're in Ecuador.. to me that sounds very hot.. they are temperature sensitive..

Good luck

osofs's picture
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Joined: 2015-10-12

Thanks for the advice, ive done my research and talked to breeders and people that own/owned dobermans and i think it is the right breed for me.

What i am worried about is if he was properly socialized by the breeder during the first months

AresMyDobie's picture
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If he wasn't lots of confidence boosting training. Every time he meets someone new hand them a treat so when they approach him it's with something positive. Keep treats on you at all times and take him a lot of places so you can give him positive experiences you want him to think oooo places, people = food :) Another good confidence boosting excerise is filling a kiddie pool with plastic bottles and cans and throwing hotdog pieces in there. This excerise will get him used to strange noises and uneven ground but he gets rewarded at the sametimes trying to get the food. These are some of the things I have done and they work great. I also let him win tug a lot of the time.

Of course not. This is what is sometimes referred to as a "green dog". Years back training didn't start til the dog was six months old. With modern training techniques it has been proven that when started very early in the dogs life (under six months) that it is easier to form foundation behaviors for what you would want the dog to do, house whole OB up to sport training, agility to the bite/protection sports and police and military work. I know many trainers that prefer a green dog over a puppy. Personally, I like puppies but would not turn down a good green dog.

Your training techniques will have a somewhat different approach. Redirecting doesn't work as well as in a young puppy most of the time. So well placed and time corrections would have to be employed to dissuade unwanted behaviors but your sits, downs, stays ect would still be positive reinforcement until you have taught the dog what is expected of him. Teach before train. (side note; never us your hands to correct ANYTHING!!. you want your hands to be ALL warm and fuzzy to the dog. When you correct with your hands it makes the dog leery of them. Use leash and collar corrections when necessary.) After ANY correction there MUST be a reward for a job well done. NEVER leave on a correction, always on a job well done with reward.

The dog WILL bond, the dog WILL learn, the dog WILL train. That part's up to you.

Gunny