5 month old puppy need help

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Drako's picture
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Joined: 2014-07-26

Hi everyone,me and my boyfriend just bought our second doberman sadly his first one ran away before he was chipped he was never found :(  then we decided to get a new one his name is drako. He is such a big baby he's adorable and absolutely loves attention.

My only problem is I feel so bad we leave him in the crate most of the day and I'm starting to feel he shouldn't be in there that long. Now we do take him outside to eat and do his buissines 3 times in the day and then he gets a good long walk in the afternoon night. I want to let him be out but whenever I do he runs to my kids room and eats whatever food they have on the floor he gets there clothes or toys. He has also ate a little hole in the carpet.

 He also pees on the carpet. I don't understand why if we have him set on a schedule already. I love him and don't know how to go about letting him out of the crate and training him not to pee and ruin things. I let him out now short bits of time to play and give him attention but I have to put him in as soon as he try's getting things. He doesn't listen to any commands he only knows how to sit and shake paw. 

I guess my question is how to train him to listen to my commands and not to destroy our home I really feel he's smart and just ignores me. 

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I suspect this was the wrong breed of dog for your family situation......these dogs HAVE to be with their people, they are smart, can reason, and need almost constant mental stimulation, and need lots of exercise!!! Being in a crate can affect their bone growth and muscle strength from lack of moving around enough which will lead to issues later on in life......your dog is young, that's puppy stage, that's CHEW stage and PEE stage.....your dog is doing dog stuff cause you aren't teaching him to do other things.....they will entertain themselves and find ways that may not be appropriate to you like chewing up the carpet if they are not having their needs fulfilled properly.

The peeing - remember - sleep, pee, eat, pee, play, pee, sleep, pee and so it goes.....a long walk is not good enough it will take much more than that, right now your youngster shouldn't be jogged or walked excessively due to the bone structure not being matured yet and too much impact on the bones too early will cause damage.......

I would suggest that you reassess whether you seriously have the time to devote to this dog and if you want this committment for the next say 14 years - if not you need to rehome this dog and stick with dogs that easily picked up and taken out and that can see a small world of your home or yard as a HUGE world, whereas you have a big dog that sees your home and yard as a small world and NOT so entertaining.....

how to work with your dog - you will have to tie/leash your dog to you so that you know at a moments notice when to take your dog outside to pee; if you are not going to supervise all the time then you need your dog tied to you somehow.....and you have to pay attention you can't be distracted with your dog tied to you cause the same actions will happen - you have to be aware of what your dog is doing and needing all the time......puppies and young dogs require that......they are children who do not understand the people world therefore they WILL get in trouble with people things.....you have to devote the time to train this breed, go to obedience to learn how to train your own dog there are easy ways and hard ways so go to obedience to learn how easy it is to train and how to do it successfully......this is just a hint a tiny hint of what's involved it would take a month of posting to educate you on what you need to do and for that I will rely on others who can go that route with you.....

But again, reading your situation - I would suggest rehoming while the dog is young enough to accept and blend with another family.....cause it sounds like you wanted a doberman cause your boyfriend had one and it would be fun to have one together; and it sounds like you expected this to be easy and the dog would "just learn" on it's own how to blend into the family and be a part of the family, but now that you have the dog and it's not "fitting in" as fast or easy as you hoped now the the dog is crated cause it's too much trouble to supervise the dog and teach the dog......if that's true those were all the wrong assumptions and reasons......rehome

Lady Kate's picture
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Hi there Drako.. we welcome you to the Forum and I will not belabor the point..but if you have any kind of feelings for this poor pup, please rehome him... look for a DOberman rescue organization to insure he goes to a family who is equipped to care for this high maintenance breed.

I'm sure you'll get a lot of messages saying the same thing.. glad you came here to ask those questions.. and I'm guessing the answers are not what your wanting to hear.... good luck

Katie

MommaL's picture
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Joined: 2014-06-15

We are a first time doberman family.  Raising this pup is more like raising a child and it has taken about as much research and time investment as my children required when they were young.  We now have an incredible family member because we invested the time and energy to teach him how to be a part if our family.

We researched the breed for a long time before committing to this pup and continue to learn everyday.  They are an incredibly intelligent dog with a lot of energy and you are not doing your family or the dog any favors by keeping him in a box all day. 

Please seriously reconsider your choice of dog.  And if you decide to rehome, please utilize a doberman rescue so that he can find a family that can meet his needs.

Drako's picture
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Joined: 2014-07-26

Thank you for your opinions yes I came on here to ask for help I do have children so I do know how hard it is to have a puppy and it's is harder then kids. However I don't like how you assume I wanted the dog just for fun and it's obvious he will not "just learn" on his own and I dont see how my post may have Implied any of what you are saying to make you assume that. I do my research and I am trying to do my best. We have spent a lot of money already on him like I said he loves us so REHOMING is not even an option. I will be glad to remove myself from this website I expected more from this website then negative comments 

MommaL's picture
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Joined: 2014-06-15

I was not trying to be offensive, I apologize.  Best of luck with your pup.

Drako's picture
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Joined: 2014-07-26

Thank you MommaL I understand everybody has there own opinion but my concern was more for what Talisin posted.

He or she took what my concerns were and made up there own assumptions. I'm sorry if my original post wasn't worded right or you may have felt the need to blow it out of proportion Talisin but like I said he loves attention so it's obvious I'm giving the attention he needs and I never once said I take him for jogs. I never said it was going to be easy. I never said he will just learn on his own I said he is smart and seems like he's ignoring me cuz he is smart

I guess my concern was how to cope with the puppy stage. And how to go about training him so he can not destroy our items in the house.

i know it will take a long process but he is already part of our family I am not willing to just give up on him or rehome him

MommaL's picture
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Joined: 2014-06-15

Personally, I read every article and thread on this site regarding puppy training (several times as we encountered a new "issue") and have read threads on other sites too.  There is a wealth of good information out there, but you have to find it for yourself and tailor it to your puppy's needs. 

It is nearly impossible for someone/anyone to give you the exact answer you seek based solely on your original post.  Puppy training is a long process and not all dogs respond in exactly the same way. 

My concern was based on your statement about kids in the house and the time demands of both.  As a child, I was bitten by a dog that was not properly trained.  He was not vicious or mean, nor was I.  It was simply the result of a miscommunication between how dogs think and how kids think.  It will be hugely important for you to be sure to train your dog how to act around your kids and your home and equally importantly, to train your kids how to act around your dog. 

Hi , you can't really have a young dog in a crate & expect it to behave when it gets out .... Not now or ever , infact it will only get worse . Poor dog can't be crated all the time . Do you let him run free & get rid of pent up energy ? What about a dog walker ? He needs 3 or 4 good long walks a day . Dobermans are exhausting .... My dog gets up at 5.20 everyday barr none ... My weekend are the same . Mine is plugged into the mains & is very energetic but that said if we didn't invest in her she would have been a 35 kilo problem dog .... Be honest with yourself as heartfelt as it is . Would drako benefit from a home that had loads more time to train him etc? Good luck Paola . 

Drako's picture
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Joined: 2014-07-26

I have two girls 5 and 2 and they adore the dog. That's one thing that is most important that they get along if they did not get along I would rehome him but that's not the case. I do the same thing to anything new I would be concerned about I would search it. And I search daily to make sure I'm doing the right things. He definatly doesn't complain when in the crate he actually likes it. As soon as he makes one peep I let him out n feed him n take him to go potty outside and walk around. I say he gets 3 walks in the daytime and in the afternoon when it's not so hot out we take him for longer walk. When we return I sit and play with his rope toy and get his energy out. I guess I'm used to having dogs that we're never crated so that's why I was concerned. If that's not enough walks I will try more. You are right about the kids part it is hard sometimes I find myself giving him more attention but in time when he's older I hope he will be more behaved and be able to roam the house freely with us. 

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

Ok so I have read your original post and my answer again - to see if I misread something.
You stated that the original dog ran off never to be found, that is truly sad. You do not mention a timeline there so I assumed the runaway and the new dog were not close in timeframe to each other.
You state "we leave him in the crate most of the day" - that is not a good situation for a doberman especially a young one, hence my statement  "the wrong breed of dog for your family situation" I did follow that with remarks about exercise and mental stimulation - neither of which can be done while you are away and he is crated. Therefore he is not getting what he needs most. And as someone else stated you cannot have a crated dog and then uncrate them and expect them to not get into things. I agree with that.....he has had no time to learn what is ok and what is not; crating is preventing him from learning. If you have no recourse - due to your schedule - but to crate him most of the day I stand by my remark that this is not fair to HIM and he needs a different home.


You wonder why he pees on the carpet and destroys things -  "He also pees on the carpet. I don't understand why if we have him set on a schedule already" - he is not getting what he needs. Yes a routine is great but not if it's not enough for HIM - if the routine is set for you and not him it's not HIS schedule therefore not meeting his needs; this breed demands human interaction almost by the minute, if you are unable to be there for him it's not fair to him.....you " let him out now short bits of time to play and give him attention but I have to put him in as soon as he try's getting things"  - this statement tells me you do not have the time for him. You have to teach him with time and patience not time outs....short bits of play are not enough.....and your final remark "how to train him to listen to my commands and not to destroy our home I really feel he's smart and just ignores me". How much time do you devote to training you don't say but if he spends his day in his crate and gets out for a short walk and a bit of play it can't add up to much.


How I came to my conclusions because you have a boyfriend that had a doberman runaway and didn't find him, you get another one and crate him most of the day, let him out for short bits of play, wonder why he pees and destroys things, and when he does begin to misbehave he goes right back in the crate and then you want to know how to train him to listen.....I do not feel I blew anything out of proportion - you do not have time for this breed. Yes your family may love him but how much??? do you love him enough to realize your time schedule with children and family obligations does not allow for the dedication it takes to raise a doberman puppy to be an ambassador of the breed?? I only ask you to truthfully see your life and time you have available and then ask if you are being fair to the dog.....


I did try to give some constructive advice on "how to work with your dog" please read that again there are some good suggestions in there, I only mentioned jogging because alot of doberman people want to get the huge amount of exercise that their dogs need, done in the form of jogging, and it has come to light that jogging with a young dog is not wise so I wanted to mention that should you decide to take up jogging in order to get him the right amount of exercise, you did ask for suggestions and I mentioned ALOT of exercise I just wanted to protect the dog from impact to the joints, it was a preventative remark, sorry it was misunderstood.

And yes anyone who crates a dog all day and then expects to pull the dog out for a bit of play and wonders why the dog is not listening and destroying things - that does sound like you expected alot from the dog without any input from your end hence the remark of fitting in and learning to be a part of the family on his own.

And putting the dog back in the crate when he misbehaves is not training the dog it's stating "I don't have time to deal with this so in you go".....


If I misread your post I regret that, but the information you gave led me to those conclusions.
I work with rottweiler rescue and I seriously have had these conversations before so this is not new territory for me. And I chose a rottweiler for my personal dog instead of a doberman because I have physical limitations that would make it unfair to this breed to own one, although I do LOVE them dearly. And I never questioned whether you loved this dog, of course you can't help but love them......but they have a LONG list of needs and it takes a vERY dedicated person to meet those needs while raising a happy family. It can be done as others here can attest.

I did and still DO suggest you go to obedience classes to learn how to raise your doberman with manners and skill. I have no idea why you are not seeing the constructive suggestions and working off of those. And I still believe in rehoming - UNLESS this dog spends more time outside his crate, than inside it, and in the full company of his humans learning and being trained, he will not live up to his full potential as a doberman. They are smart, so smart that they can become destructive and hard to handle if not trained early and worked with and some of his most formative time so far has been inside a crate, and of course he likes his crate that's where he spends most of his day.


And I am not over reacting, I fight for dogs lives every minute of every day and I watch them go to the shelters and die because people got dogs they did not have time for, will I ever shut up trying to get that across to anyone who indicates that they do not have the time for their dog - NO and I will not feel bad about that cause I am a voice for the dog since they have none.
And asking you to seriously assess your lifestyle and time is not too much to ask when a life hangs in the balance of that answer. Over react - if it saves a life or helps a dog find a family that has the time for him/her then I gladly will over react in the eyes of the other person.

Am I saying you will tire of this dog and take him to the shelter I have no idea, but I see it everyday and I would like to help prevent that if I can, which can result in my being very direct towards people.


Please see my posts - both of them - in the spirit in which they are written - from the perspective of the dog only....and what that dogs needs.

Konkie's picture
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As harsh as Tal's post may sound, I would tend to agree.

 

It's not fair on the puppy to keep him crated for "most of the day"- and you obviously realise this or you wouldnt have posted. He needs interaction with you and your family for "most of the day" and in the crate for only short periods/night time. You havent said how old he is but if you only take him out to do his business 3x a day this is probably not enough. A pup can only hold their bladder on average the same number of hours that he is in months and double that at night time, so this may be why he is peeing in the house, you could try carrying him from the crate to the place where you want him to eliminate if he is just falling short on the way to the door as they wont tend to pee when you are holding them. Edit: just noticed age is in the title so he should be able to hold it ok as long as he has learnt to

 

Perhaps you can keep your kids doors closed or check for spilled food before you let him out, and he will need to be watched constantly, he shouldn't have the opportunity to chew holes in the carpet. If you are crating him most of the time, he doesnt have the opportunity to learn which things are off limits and probably has so much pent up energy from being cooped up he will be like a whirlwind, try giving him a frozen kong or something appropriate to play with, and praise him when he is playing with the right things rather than destroying your house!

 

In my opinion, based on your first post, you need to change your routine to one that involves your dog being crated less and more interaction with you all, or else you are going to have an unhappy and possibly mentally unhinged dog. You wouldnt shut a child in a small room for most of each day and expect them to be a well balanced youngster so don't expect the same of a pup. I think you can do this it will just take patience, some trust in him from you, and some household destruction- I don't think anyone with a puppy gets away with nothing being destroyed!

I would suggest a good book on raising and training a puppy - my favorite (the one I send home with my puppy families) is:  How to raise a puppy you can live with by Rutherford and Neil . you can find it on Amazon.com

Also, it isn't fair to leave the puppy in a crate all the time. Train your kids to keep their bedroom doors shut. I've raised many Dobermans with kids and we all keep our bedroom doors shut during the day. Keep the puppy on a leash in the house until he is fully house trained. I personally keep my kitchen gated off when we have a puppy in the house - so that if they mess, it is on a floor that is easy to clean. 

First thing is to get a good book and read it! If you don't think that you can raise a puppy then take it back to your breeder. Also, I would call them now and ask for help ... a good breeder should be there for you. 

SabrinaG's picture
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My little guy never accepted a crate. Instead, I made him a "corner" in the living room by moving furniture around and getting a baby gate. He actually spent very little time in his "corner". He way a typical puppy ... chewed my surround sound wires, chewed the furniture, chewed a pair of shoes, picked the carpet, peed and pood on the floor, etc. It all goes with having a pup.

He was particularly stubborn about house training until I put up a fenced area for him so he could go outside by himself to potty. He had two accidents the day after that, but nothing since then.

He goes to the Bark Park several times a week for a couple of hours. We are in a small place, and even just being in the park by himself, with no other dogs, is enjoyable for him.

My little dragon has been with me 24/7 since he was about 9 weeks old. He goes everywhere I go. He sleeps with me at night. When he was little we would curl up on the loveseat together (now the loveseat is just his).

Perhaps I am just very lucky, but he stopped most of his puppy behavior on his own. He still likes to have a shoe close to him, but he hasn't chewed on one for months. The most he received for chewing was a firm "Stop". I still make sure he has a variety of toys that are acceptable to chew on.

I believe that, because of our closeness, he doesn't want me to be dissappointed in his behavior, so he rarely misbehaves. Perhaps I'm dillusional, who knows. What I do know is this, we would not have the incredible relationship we have if he spent most of his time in a crate or "corner".

All of the suggestions you have received are great and warrant a try. My suggestion is to puppy-proof your house as much as you can, just like you do with small children, but I think its unreasonable to expect no puppy damage. As you know, you really are raising another child when you get a pup, but a child that is almost too smart for your own good! Please try to allow your little guy to interact more with you and your family. You will be so much happier, as will he, because of it.

steph05's picture
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When I got Rosco  I had the first couple weeks off then he ended up being alone in his crate around two hours at a time during the daym  with lots of play and breaks in between, as most of us will vouch if not given enough exercise is given they will tend to be naughtier. I always felt bad when he was little for him being in his crate part of the day so I never crated him at night, we sectiond off a corner right next too my bed and that's where he slept (before he claimed his own spot on the bed!).

They really do need to be monitored constantly even at your boys age, if not he will find something better too do. As you said it is like raising a child, and I am sure you understand how much gets done when you are busy taking care of one (NOT!). We always found a verbal command when going outside to "go pee" helped and we clicker trained a lot of things. Rosco never chewed anything because we never gave him the chance. If I ever saw him with something he wasn't supposed to have he got a firm "No" and I would offer him his own toy and praise him.

Consistency really is key, don't give up, and I do agree with others that if you could get someone to play with him during the day he would be much happier!

 

Drako's picture
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Joined: 2014-07-26

Talisin I understand your defensiveness now. However I only posted a short part of our drako. I tried making it sweet and short to get some help. And the way I see it is your reading what I'm saying and your playing it like a movie in your head and assuming I'm doing things to the dog that is not true. I understand you want to prevent having animals be brought to shelters who are abused but your making it out as if I'm abusing the dog. I am with him all day I'm a stay at home mom so I'm with him more then my boyfriend. It took us 3 years after the first dog got loose so the timing is nowhere close. 

I am going to get a book and study up on how to train him and look for good training near me. I am not going to be like those people you are trying to make me out to be 

talisin's picture
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I am not making you out to be anything and I don't play movies in my head.....I know you don't know me but I have worked with animals all my life and have fought for them all my life...I never said he was being abused; I do know of several people locally who are stay at home and they crate their animals most of the day and I have seen first hand what that leads to.....these people are stay at home yet they are so busy with their daily routine that the dog is in the way, or underfoot or getting into things which takes time to go get the dog and see or clean up whatever has been gotten into, and they just don't want to spare the time to "be there" for their dog, so the crate becomes an easy out to discipline and training.

My first question would be if you are stay at home then why is he in the crate "most of the day"? Do you have the time to spend with him training him or are you working at home instead of the office and can't be interrupted by him regularly? I agree with the above posts that you will have to rearrange your schedule to work him in, especially if you are at home all day, good grief he should be tethered to you and you should be able to work with him ALOT.....having him tethered to you will allow him to be a full working part of the household, he can do laundry with you, wash the dishes with you, work at the desk with you or whatever your day consists of, he should be out of the crate and with you. Teaching him is a non stop process, there is no down time just like with kids it's a 24/7 job.....crating him is just putting off the inevitable training and by the time you have time for him he may be past the point of wanting to listen to you.

My second question would be are you able to go to obedience class with him?? I have mentioned that several times but have not heard if that's a possibility. Try to choose someone who has worked with or owned dobermans themselves since they are a breed unto themselves and learn differently.

I know I have trained my dogs by working with them every minute of every day that I am at home, telling them what I want, showing them what I want and rewarding them when they do that and ignoring the parts they don't get and I have had my current rottweiler for only 3 months now and he already understands most of my hand signals and he is 9 years old and I have absolutely no history on him except he was abandoned in a field in CA and left on his own, he is now in NC with me and enjoying his end life. They are never too old or too young to learn but listening has to come first and being crated will cause him to not listen all that well to you since he is not interacting with you that much. Plus watching the activities in the household will also teach him about noises and smells and sites that he needs to get used to. As everyone has said "close the doors". Simple fix. It is only when the kids understand that this is a living being that eats things and can die from the things that are left on the floor if not digestible the doors need to be closed and the dog needs to be tied to you.....everyone needs to train consistently.....

Please try to incorporate him into your every move daily it will make him a more rounded dog and will make him a better dog for the family, teach him instead of crating him and remember until he understands that peeing inside is not allowed run him outside every half hour until he no longer makes a mess then move it up a half hour etc. until you get him to the routine that is healthy for his age and body.

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I agree with Talisin, she can come off as abrasive at first, but in the long run, you'll understand that she isn't trying to be mean with anything. But helping, and being blunt with it. It's highly respectable that she took the time to help.

You ask for advice, and not all advice is going to be "nice" or "sugar coated". The best advice is sometimes the kind that upsets you. Take the criticism, and make your home a happy one for Drako. If you can't do that, then he may be better off in a different home. 

If you're home, he should be out with you. Let him be close to you, and give him lots of toys to play with. If he starts tearing up something, then redirect him towards a toy. It took me being laid off for 9 months to get Max fully adjusted. He just recently started being let out for the second half of the day. My fiance lets him out on her lunch, and he's done great since.

Best of luck to you, and hope you see how everything is being said to you.

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Disclaimer: It sounds like you are dead-set on keeping your puppy and making it work, so I am basing my comments on that. I agree that perhaps a different breed would be better suited, but whether you decide to go that route or stay the course is ultimately your decision.


I have a doberman puppy who is 21 weeks old now, so I can see where you are coming from. I have been around a lot of dogs, but Juneau is my first doberman. Thus far I have not had any of the behavioral issues of which you speak, which may be partly my particular puppy, or partly my lifestyle. I work 4 10 hour days a week, so my schedule is hardly conducive to a puppy, but so far it works. If I can make it work, I believe that you probably can as well if you are as determined as you say.


The crating thing would definitely be of concern to me. There is, simply said, no way that your puppy is getting out the required energy if crated most of the day, even if you take him on numerous walks. I work graves and leave Juneau out of his crate with my other dog while I am at work. I then crate him for my 4 hour "morning nap" so that he knows what his kennel is and has a distinct down period where he is expected to behave in his crate. Walks are great, and I take June on several daily, but as mentioned numerous times already, this is a very intelligent breed. Intellectual stimulation is a huge component to a happy, well-rounded puppy. That being said, June has several training sessions each day, usually with minor distractions present. I also make him perform a "trick" (sit, down, paw, simple stuff) for everything. To get his leash put on, for breakfast, to pass through the door after me, to get cuddles. He is my little shadow, and this process has just become a part of my life--not a distinct part of my day, but a homogenous mixture into my life. Since I am always moving around the house, and he wants to follow along, this adds up to a lot of mental work for him, and by the time I ever sit down, June falls straight asleep nearby. From your comments I am inclined to believe that you are home quite a bit (though busy), so if you are able to integrate your puppy into all of your activities you may see an immediate and drastic improvement.

Juneau has had one accident when I didn't realize that he needed to go out because he was whining in the kitchen instead of at the door. No more accidents. He will occasionally pick up a shoe, which prompts a calm "Juneau, drop it," replacement with usually a ball/rope combo (similar weight and material), and praise when he plays with that. So far nothing has been severely chewed. He barks when there is something at which to bark, but never obsessively, as confirmed by my neighbor who said that he is quiet all night. Like I said, my schedule is far from ideal for puppy raising and I am certain that there are things that I am doing incorrectly, but so far I seem to have a well-rounded, well-behaved puppy.


Best of luck if you choose to keep him, although I doubt anyone here would think poorly of you if you decide that a different breed is better suited to your lifestyle.

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Drako Talisin has an abundant love for dogs. Please don't take her statements as mean spirited. She loves animals so much she would go to the ends of the earth to care for them.

I have a 4 month old male he is a bundle of energy that can drag me down. He pees about ever hour he is a puppy, that is what they do. Sometimes he lets me know sometimes he doesn't. Whether he lets me know or not I take him out every hour, and he gets a lot of clapping and yeahing plus a treat. But he still has accidents. He knows he did wrong so at least he has learned that.

I am an elderly lady (61) with hip issues and health problems.

In home we play a lot of tug and fetch. We go to the park as often as I can tolerate the Houston weather and we walk, he runs.

He also likes to chase a laser light which I will do outside sometimes so he can use the full back yard.

Puppies have an amount of energy that is way crazy.

The chewing is aggravating I am sure. He has a basket full of toys. I mean a lot of toys he has at least 30 different types He tears into them constantly. I repair, wash, throw in washing machine, back to toy basket, and repeat when necessary. We have tug ropes, squeakers, even stuffed toys I pick up at dollar store. Plus the old stuffed animals I put away.

I did catch Meechee chewing rug and the wood casing on the doorway so I understand that frustration. When you say no you have to be stern. It is the tone they understand.

They are teething and need to chew. If you get bones make sure they are raw not cooked.

It is a lot of work but so worth it. Meechee does go after my shoes I make sure I keep my good ones in the closed closet. My house shoes are out and I am teaching him no to those. He has one pair that I let him have. (I was going to throw them out anyway) So far it is a daily test to keep him away from my house shoes.

You also have to reinforce the things they have learned or they get out of the habit.

I have treat buckets in air tight containers in various areas through the house. Most times he get great praise for listening other times he gets treats.

If money is tight go to the dollar store but rope make your own tug toys. Be aware they are very strong even at this age and not a good idea for children to play tug. He will pull them all through the house.

You can teach him to leave food alone. Teach him leave it, wait, etc. You can do this at feeding time also. Make him wait when you give him his food. Give him the command you want to use.

Leave it, drop and wait are a few commands you should reinforce daily.

It is a lot of work and very frustrating but in the long run you will have a wonderful Doberbaby. They are an amazing dog.

Drako's picture
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Joined: 2014-07-26

Thank you all for the advice I have been. Doing more of those and drako has been so much better only one accident in the house since but that's good progress. I also take him to my mother in laws daily to get his play on with there dogs. We've bought him more toys I think that's why he was getting into our things now he is acting much better your right about the commands I do need to work on that more. I have been giving him treats and praising him when he goes outside and when he does other good things so I think I am in the right track. 

And tsilin thank you for the help I know you seemed really harsh at first. But I understand your love for animals. You all have been right about the things I was doing wrong and I admit it because now he is acting so much better. 

I got to take in 1 week old babie kittens there mother went missing and I tell you drako is so sweet and loving to them you'd think he's there mother so he helps me lick those babies clean and he enjoys it lol it's kinda ironic. But that also keeps him busy too. 

Grace's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-12

Pet Profiles

Such great news. So glad things are turning around for you.

It is so cute about the kittens. I have thought about getting one for Meechee cause they are so playful. Not sure I will because some I am allergic to.

Awesome news great idea for taking them to mom-in-law's house.

Keep us posted would love to learn more through your posts too since I am raising a pup also.

He just gave me a kiss and went off to lay on my bed for a nap.

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

So glad that you were open to the advice and suggestions and found the time to see what he was needing, and I am sure those kittens are keeping him busy our other rottweiler raised a litter of kittens, we adopted him when he was 7 years old and found the kittens when they were about 1 week old had to bottle feed them to help out the mom and without knowing the history of our rottie we were worried but he did great and shared his bed, his food, let them climb on him and one cat actually slept on him and gave him shoulder rubs.....

you will have to share pics of the him with the kitties.....

And yes Grace I would die for any animal in need gladly......I love them all and always want to be their voice.....I usually try to stay somewhat detached when I post advice or suggestions cause it doesn't pay to get too emotional, and sometimes that detachment can come off as "harsh" or "stern" but its just because I have an emotional investment in all animals and their needs and I have to stay detached or I won't make much sense when I post....hope that made sense....plus emotional posts just result in highly emotional responses which don't serve the animals in question......

So glad the guys here on the forum recognize my passion for the animals and my family has always said that one day they will pick up the paper and see where I headline because I died saving an animals life or beating the crap out of someone for harming them....

Konkie's picture
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Joined: 2014-05-06

Pet Profiles

Fabulous to hear Drako is doing better with his behaviours :)

 

I've just started proper training classes and one thing they recommended was using really high value rewards for training such as cheese or ham/sausage rather than kibbles, the stinkier the better as your pup will smell it and be more trainable.