Won't stop jumping on everyone

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D.Lett's picture
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My doberman is about 13 months now. Don't really have any problems with him. The only thing is that he constantly jumps on you. While your outside with him he is jumping all over you the whole time unless he has a toy or something he is playing with. Inside its about the same thing. If your on the floor playing with him hes fine, but as soon as you go to sit on the couch hes jumping right in your lap. Will he gradually grow out of this or what do I need to do to help him stop this? Thanks.

Lady Kate's picture
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when we first rescued Sofia, she had a little bit of a problem with jumping on people.. I told her "NO! and gently raised my knee to her chest when she tried.. It only took a couple of times for her to learn that a 90 pound DoberDiva could flatten a 110 pound mama.

D.Lett's picture
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I have always done that and continue to do so, but it just doesnt seem to help. Hes always just so hyper and jumping all over everyone.

Ponch11's picture
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I was able to break Poncho of the habit by commanding "sit", and if the behavior continues, crossing my arms and turning my back my back to him. When he is in the "sit" position, then he gets my attention and love. Of course the hardest part was when I have company who don't speak dog and they react with their hands out in front of them, often times waving them about (particulary people who are afraid of dogs are the worst).  

BUT! I agree with Lady Kate, too. I've known people to use that "knee up" as opposed to "back turned" with success.

 

 Good luck, it is annoying!  

laith's picture
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I do a knee up and a half turn back. And I make sure my arms are closed! 

Laith never really had issues with jumping except with one person. Our CGC guy and trainer. Go figure! He is in LOVE with him. When Laith tries to jump he will cuff his hands in his chest and pay him no attention until he is calm. 

As far as outside, playing. Keep your toy away from your body. Laith likes to snatch and run with toys so he has attempted that jump. It is a big NO-NO. Because if you are in public and jumps on a pregnant woman or a child = bad news. 

If you are letting him chase you and that is why he jumps - I would just not play chase. If Laith gets too worked up I just get him in the sit position to refocus.

Always, reward the good behavior. Ignore bad and then reinforce good. 

D.Lett's picture
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Some good tips there. Thanks guys

Jensen8278's picture
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I have the same problem, but none of this phases Ella (9 mo old). I keep a collar on her and when she's close to me, I hold her down and tell her NO! everytime she tries to jump. It has not been an easy battle with her, but she is getting better

scotty's picture
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I have the same problem with Cleo and have tried all the suggestions above but she just does not get it.  I put it down to her exhuberance and love of people, she expects everyone to love her.   I am at my wits end trying to break her of this habit.   I recently bought a new product, pet corrector, which is a can of compressed air which makes a loud hissing noise and seems to be working but it has not cured her as if I don't have the can in my hand she will jump up.  

It is almost as if she is on springs, one minute she is by your side, next her face is level with yours, no warning, she just springs up.   She also sometimes bounces off you by thowing herself at you, sometimes connecting and using you as a springboard other times,  if I notice her coming my way and side step, she just flies past and I could swear she has a smile on her face !  

I keep hoping it will improve as she gets older.  We are tring to be very consistant with our corrections but its taking a long time.

Lady Kate's picture
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Scotty~~~ Owww... Nothing like  a smiling Doberface in YOURS...Hope she gets it before she's a lot bigger.. Isn't it amazing how strong they are! Good luck. You've got the key... consistany!

KevinK's picture
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Most dogs like to jump up unless they're trained not to.  They like to get to your face.  I like to teach a dog to sit for attention.  In other words, you teach the dog that jumping up gets nothing accomplished, but coming to you and sitting nicely gets hugely rewarded.  With a puppy, it's one of the first things I work on.  I always reward sitting nicely, even if it's just a "good girl" from across the room.  After a while, your dog starts to understand that sitting nicely is a good way to make good things happen.  Once that is realized, it becomes much easier, because there's really no benefit to jumping around.

DJ's Dad's picture
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Kevin has a good point.  I teach mine 'sit' for everything.  Before going out, before eating, before getting a treat--and they know that jumping up is not tolerated.  Ziva never was a jumper, except for when she was in puppy classes and she LOVED the instructor and would constantly try to jump up and put her big paws on the instructor's legs....but that got curtailed, so it didnt last too long.  One of my Rat Terriers, Lucy, is a pogo stick dog, though.  She doesnt necessarily jump ON me, but she jumps straight up in the air from a complete stop and just bounds up and down in front of me.  She's a real character.

laith's picture
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@Ziva's dad- Ziva sounds just like Laith! What is it about trainers? And the bounce?! I thought Laith was nuts. But he pounces vertical in front of you - never touching you. Cracks people up! 

jeshykai's picture
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For dogs that just can't settle down on their own, you can try the "totem pole" technique when you know they are going to be 100% unfocused and excited (when guests are over).  Have them leashed up, flat-buckle collar will work just fine but I usually have Steve's prong on so he minds his manners as previously trained.  Have the dog in a lay down, put the leash short and stand on it.  When you open the door or are talking to your guests tell them that you are all ignoring the dog.  The dog will whine, try to jump, and self-correct with the leash.  No verbal response or looking at the dog.  This works because some dogs, no matter the correction, thrive off the attention.

laith's picture
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Very good point Jes! I need to work on that. Laith doesn't like visitors.

scotty's picture
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Thanks Jes, I'll try the lock down too, we do try to get everone to ignore Cleo when they come to visit as she gets very excited, unlike Laith, she loves visitors !   Not everyone does though !   We will definitely give the lock down a try.

bbroyles's picture
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We haven't had National Geographic in forever. Recently added and have been able to see Caesar Milan. Some of your techniques sound like his approaches. His dog/pack behavior knowledge is amazing. Wish I'd known him decades ago.
It's terrific having so many helpful ideas from people on this forum!

Livelaughlove1's picture
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What great advice!  Mopar is normally very well behaved but I have a very close friend who he simply adores.. The problem is that he loves her so much he wont leave her alone.  He jumps, wiggles between her legs, licks her face and goes bonkers every time she is here.  The last time she came over, I gave in and put his prong on him and told him to lay down.  After a few minutes he walked over and sat down smiling waiting on her attention.  I think he knows that the prong collar is a correction and its working for him .. SO FAR.. lol  She doesnt mind him jumping up but at 95 pounds and just turning a year old soon, he doesnt understand his own strength..

scotty's picture
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That's it exactly LLL, they don't realise how big they are or their own strength. Cleo thinks she is a lap dog really.  She has a wonderful personality but she thinks, no expects, everyone should love her.   

Unfortunately we cannot get prong collars in the Uk (maybe online - I'll have to check), let alone a choke collar, only half check collars which do not give you the same control.  We have some choke collars we used on our prevous dobes and I have started using one on Cleo which is definnitely better than the half choke. 

My son and his girlfriend are visitng this afternoon so I will try the ignore and lay down method when they arrive.  

Livelaughlove1's picture
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Scottie, If you cant find a prong collar and want one.. Im sure I or one of us here could pick it up and mail it to you.. You could send the funds through paypal.. They cant control what you get as a "gift" through teh mail can they?

scotty's picture
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Thanks LLL for the offer but I don't think I am brave enough to face the PC Mob who would be up in arms if they saw me using a prong collar, it is bad enough just using a choke chain.   I started today ignoring Cleo until she was calm and I think she is getting the message already.   I have watched so many episodes of Cesar Milan and his no touch no talk no eye contact - DOH !!

You know we know all this stuff having had Dobies for the past 30 years but this is the first puppy we have had for a long time, our last 3 dobes were beautiful rescues, and we have spoiled Cleo and maybe trying to keep her our baby but it is not fair on her.  

She is very obedient outside, her recall is fantastic, she walks to heel (most of the time) and I can get her to sit and  stay for quite a long distance but we have not been so consistent in the house and have been rewarding the wrong behaviour .... so its time we took control, I've known it for a while but was kidding myself she was just a puppy and would grow out of it.   From today unless she is calm and her butt is on the floor, no attention !

Thanks to all the advice on this forum the penny has finally dropped.

bbroyles's picture
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Scotty ~ You've given us all a good reminder! We have to train ourselves!

Check out the prong collar threads. They are reported by many to be much safer than the choke and there are some designed to be hidden, to avoid the corrections and stares of those who have misconceptions.

IloveAthena's picture
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A little late to this post, but I was just about to ask the same question.  People might think it's cute now, but when she's bigger it's not going to fly.  I've already been working on making her sit before I allow others to pet her.  I swear she's like a Mexican jumping bean saying "look at me look at me" like she has never been touched before.  I will definitely try the turning your back to her.

KevinK's picture
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Consistency, consistency, consistency!  That's the key.  My girl doesn't jump on me or my wife.  She will jump all over my mother, because she allows it.  she doesn't jump on anyone else.

von Cosack Dobermann (not verified)
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Try some "positive " training!!! if the dog wants to jump teach a word that allows them to. Hoding your arm out away from your body give the command "come up"!!! Then with a leash in hand, contacted to a correction (choker) collar tell the dog "Off"!! If you get no response then correct the dog with quick correction motions, remember the corrections are fast and the collar must release quickly. So you have "Come Up" and "OFF" use toys or food but definetly your voice for praise as you gain success. When you can turn a negative into a positive you do it. This works well when you teach a Dobermann to speak they usually "speak" at almost anything hahahaha!!! So you teach "quiet" also. Turning your back is NOT the way to train, avoidance is a weak posture, they may stop the jumping with you but will start elsewhere. Never let your dogs assume that your a weak character always be a leader. Von

laith's picture
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I don't but the man of the house uses "HUG" as a cue for Laith to jump to him. He will put his front paws up on his chest. 

I don't dare. 

von Cosack Dobermann (not verified)
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.....to come up is easy, its the "OFF" thats important, hows that go? Von

laith's picture
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We don't have issues with jumping. He listens just fine (to that command). :)

von Cosack Dobermann (not verified)
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......well thats good laith but I was talking to the OP (D. lett) hahahaha. Would like to hear from the OP to hear if theres progress or not. Von