Tearing and teething

10 replies [Last post]
dobiemom05's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-15

Pet Profiles

Okay so my Pixie girl is almost 12 weeks now.  I know she is still very young, but I am at my wits end with her tearing up EVERYTHING she gets her paws on.  I have taken away things, worked with her with the "No" and "Leave it" command, but to no avail.  Does anyone have any helpful things I can do?  We are still working on basic commands but she is not interested at all even with treats.  So far "Sit" has worked well.  Help please?  

 

We are starting with her posting tomorrow as well.  She gets her stitches out finally!  She has had a temporary post where the stitches were left open, and she has worn an E Collar so she doesn't harm her stitches.  However, I was thinking that she wouldn't need it once we get a more sturdy posting tomorrow.  Do I need to keep it on her or just keep trying with her training if she messes with it?  This is my first dobe and she is definetly becoming a challenge.  Love her though!

Sir-Phin's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-04-17

Pet Profiles

Phin did well without using a collar after his cropping, in fact it came off as soon as we got home because he was hurting himself more with it on than with it off. 

Kong puts out an inflatable collar that looks a bit less troublesome.

DJ's Dad's picture
Offline
Joined: 2010-10-04

Pet Profiles

About the tearing up everything---here's what worked for me.  When Z was little, I filled up three boxes with toys....everything I could find that was ok for her to chew, rip, tear up or just play with.  I bought things at garage sales and thrift stores because I knew she would end up shredding them, and I get a lot more upset when she tears up a $10 toy than I do when she ripped up something I only had to pay 50-cents for. LOL.  She had plenty of her own things to pick from, and with very little encouragement, she left my stuff alone.  She never chewed furniture legs, books, underwear, or shoes.  If at any time I noticed she had something she was not allowed to play with, it got taken away and she was re-directed to one of the boxes of toys where she could root her nose through and find whatever seemed to be the best thing to tear up at the moment.  I had to sweep up debris often, but it was HER stuff that she was destroying, not mine. 

jeshykai's picture
Offline
Joined: 2010-09-02

Pet Profiles

Just like Paul.. I always have a lot of options that are dog-friendly, dog-stuff around my house.  They have 2 boxes of toys, and one of chews, that they have access to at all times.  I pick up their stuff and put it away and part of the game for them is bring it all out.

If she is getting into your stuff and chewing things up, first thing that comes to my mind is she does not have enough mental activity going on.  Even if its by herself, she should have something that she is encouraged to do - at night, all my dogs settle down with a chew.  When Steve was a puppy to keep him in the living room, I had a tie down area where he was clipped to a leash with his chew and a toy beside him so he couldn't wander and get into mischief and my smaller dogs had time to wander the house without having him chase them to play.  So there's an idea.

Also, when I was unable to give him my full attention he was either tied to my desk where I was studying with a chew and a toy or he was in his sun room area with all his toys or in his crate.  I never gave him the opportunity to get into anything and destroy something he shouldn't.  I was always one step ahead of him.

They don't know what is acceptable or not at this age... they don't know until you tell them "NO" so you must constantly be thinking, "What can Pixie get into in this room I don't want her to?" put the stuff up, close some doors, and give her safe places to play where she can't hurt anything.

As far as not being interested in treats... you most likely are not using a treat that has high enough value to her.  The treats in the stores need to have a really strong smell out of the package to get them excited, or you can try hot dogs or boiled chicken.  I find it's cheaper to take a package of hot dogs, slice them up, bake them on 350 for about 30 minutes (to take the slime away) and then use that as my high value treats.  They DROOL for them.  And Steve was never very treat motivated (still isn't) but he got a kick out of learning things anyway.  I'd recommend you take her to an obedience class, you may not know how to teach her in a manner that she can grasp - and I don't mean that offensively - but there are plenty of tricks to get them in position of what you want to reward.  Like the good smelling chicken in front of the nose and tilting it back over their head to "ease" them into a sit.. once that butts on the floor, reward!  And then the lay down, guiding that chicken down and holding it in your fist at the ground until she finally plops her whole body into a lay.

Also, the socialization aspect is great for the pups.

DJ's Dad's picture
Offline
Joined: 2010-10-04

Pet Profiles

from jeshykai: I find it's cheaper to take a package of hot dogs, slice them up, bake them on 350 for about 30 minutes (to take the slime away) and then use that as my high value treats.  They DROOL for them.

I do the same thing, only I cut a hot dog into slices about as thick as a nickel, put them on a paper towel and microwave for a minute or so until they are crisp.  Takes the sliminess out and they are much easier to put into a small zip-lock bag to keep for a day or so.

Joined: 2011-07-20

Oooo, thanks for the hot dog idea, guys!

dobiemom05's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-15

Pet Profiles

Yeah I agree those are all excellent ideas!  I'm gonna try them.  I have some toys for her but she keeps pushing them under the bed.  Maybe a toy box is exactly what we need.  I will also try the hot dogs cause that is something we keep pretty regularly around here.  Thanks for the support.

 

She has been pretty good today, got her stitches out.  She only pawed at her ears once or twice until she realized "Hey that hurt!".  No more "Collar of Shame".....for now anyway.  Now to wait for her ears to heal some more before we start posting.  The vet gave her some ointment for me to put on and she is tolerating that pretty well too.  Wish us luck!

cemberdyllion's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-10-04

We did what Ziva's Dad did (our boy is 4 months old) and he hasn't chewed up anything besides his own toys. We stocked up on loads of toys (thrifting, pet store, dollar store, etc) and do not leave anything out that we don't want him to get into. That means closed doors, shoes, slippers, etc put away, picking up everything off the floor so it elliminates temptation/probabilty of something happening when you're not around to catch them in the act.

I'll also rotate out his toys, so that his lobster stuffie that he played with a couple weeks ago is brand new again this week! (His eyes get shiny with happiness and he gets super wiggly when we bring a well-loved toy out!)

Keeping a variety of things for him to do/toys to play with REALLY helps. He's literally only chewed on his own toys and bones. Well, he did chew up his bed we got him, but after the 3rd time I put his bed away he realized 'ohhhh, my bed is a privilege, not a right. I shouldn't be chewing on that if I want to have some luxury in mom's office!'

We do have an issue with him chewing on sticks/bark in the yard. We've cleaned the yard as best as we could sticks, twigs, leaves, etc GONE but he manages to find stuff. My hub bought those long bone chews that look sort-of like sticks and he's going to throw some into the yard hoping to divert his attention to them instead. Hopefully it'll work!

Good luck with your girl!!

dobiemom05's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-15

Pet Profiles

Thanks everyone!  We are working on it now!  However, we have a new problem we need to address and that is that she has figured out how to get on my bed and is pulling at my comforter.  I do not want to encourage her being on my bed, so when I catch her trying to get up there or see her on it I say "No!  Down!" and get her off the bed.  I then take her to her bed which is right next to it and make her lay down.  She's being a stubborn dobie, but am I doing the right thing?  I'm having mixed results with this.  When she is laying on her bed, I praise her and tell her "Your bed, Yes!"  Is this the right approach or is there something else I need to be doing?  I didn't want to start yet another thread (I think I'm getting annoying lol).  Help please with this as well?  Do I treat her when she is in her bed or is that too late because she can be there for several minutes before I see her on it.  

cemberdyllion's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-10-04

You're not being annoying! I know I'm pretty brand new here but everyone on here has been nothing but helpful answering questions and super nice. :) For the bed issue, I wouldn't allow access to the bedroom unless you were in there with her, that way you can catch her AS she is trying to get up there and nip that behavior with a quick tssssst! No! and then re-direct her to her own bed. If she's already been up there for however long and then you see her and correct her, it won't be as clear to her why she's being told no, etc.

Happydance's picture
Offline
Joined: 2010-11-14

Pet Profiles

Dobiemom, what word do you use when you want her to lay down?  If you're telling her "No, Down" meaning to get off the bed and you use the word "Down" meaning to lay down, it will be very confusing.  I pointed a finger away from the bed and said "Off" when I didn't want her on there. I took ahold of her collar and guided her off.  Now she just knows the word and readily gets off the bed.  Once I said "off" I ALWAYS followed through (as you should with any command) and she knows I mean it.  She may hesitate and try to push it as they do in their rebellious moments haha, but a simple change of my body language and she's off in a flash.