Seperation Anxiety

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Magnumdobie's picture
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Joined: 2011-10-03

My 10 week old puppy is showing signs of what may eventually turn into a form of seperation anxiety as an adult. Often when he is left alone in the room for even a few minutes he sits at the door directly behind it to just whine and eventually those whines turn into a combination of whines and crys that are loud enough to be heard throughout the whole house. His crate is used for sleeping at this point and he does fairly well in it after he has woken up from sleeping. I have tried using the method of saying wrong and grabbing his muzzle if at the point of my quick return if he is still whining/crying at that point. Has anyone been threw this with their doberman or any dog for that matter? Have any earlier actions faciliated it? Any ideas on curbing it before it possibly may become more serious?

You want to time your return for whey he isn't whining/crying and reward him for that.  Any attention is attention when they are being bad.  If his whining gets you  to return, then you are rewarding the whining.  This is a behavior that you want to extinguish by rewarding the correct behavior.

finding Jackson's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-29

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I've heard that dobermans suffer from separation anxiety, so I did a lot of coming and going even if it was just 5 minute separations. Eventually, I would gradually increase the duration of separation. Supposedly, this method allows dobies to eventually become more comfortable with separation. I also ensured he was trained on house rules prior to long separation sessions (1 hour or more). 

Lori's picture
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Joined: 2010-04-03

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As Fitz said - quit rewarding bad behavior.  any attention is still attention and whether you walk in to tell him NO or grab his muzzle, etc you're still giving him the attention he's asking for.  Stop doing that.  completely ignore him until he stops and is quiet for a few minutes.  Then you can go see him if you want but checking on him, soothing him, yelling at his etc is just giving him attention and teaching him that if he keeps it up long enough you will come back. 

Magnumdobie's picture
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Joined: 2011-10-03

Okay thanks everyone. I appreciate the input and will be implementing some new tactics.