How "protective" is you Doberman?

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Sniper's picture
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Well I know these babes have a bad rep and half the time couldn't hurt a fly. My pup is nearing 8 months old. She is really cuddly, sweet and doesn't appear aggressive. However, when I pick up my infant child or my toddler, she seems to jump up on me and bite at them. I am not sure if she is playing or trying to protect the kids or could be jealous? She never jumps on me uncontrollably unless I pick up one of my children. Any insight on this?

As for the protection question, we have had her since 8 weeks old. I think she knows by now that we are her family and this is her house and yard. Well someone broke into our garage two nights in a row. I am worried about them returning and possibly hurting her to get in our house or garage again.

How protective are these dogs by nature? If an intruder came, would your dog fight them or end up being cuddly & sweet? How long until they sense stranger danger?

Lady Kate's picture
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I think it depends on your particular dog, sometimes as late as 9-12 months before they show a protective nature.. sometimes sooner.. There's nothing written in stone.

However it's my opinion that this is in their DNA. I'm going to tell a story that might sound really OUT THERE..but I promise this is true. Actually two stories.

Our Sofia ( who, as people who know, is as sweet and gentle as any creature on the face of the earth) has shown a protectiveness that made MY hair stand on end... The first time I noticed ( BTW we live in Mexico) I was in the car with her, waiting for my husband to pick up something from a local mercado. Sofia was sound asleep in the back of the car. I was reading. A young man walked out of the store, shirtless and with prison tats on his face and neck.. Sofia came out of a DEEP ( as in snoring like a freight train deep) sleep and was at the window all hackly and snarly.. The kid hadn't even looked our way ) She just 'knew' he was bad business.

Just last week. she and Mike were out on the golf course hitting some balls.. Lupita, our former house keeper who is now working full time at the local hotel was cleaning the men's room on one of the holes.. They had said their hellos then Lupita put the sign out in the front warning people that it was occupied and went inside the bano to clean. A man walked into the room while she was there and Sofia went totally ballistic.. rearing up on her hind legs tugging at her halter and howling like a banshee..

I'm hoping other people will chime in with their examples.. but in my opinion.. they would give their lives for you.

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Depends entirely on the dog and the person.  If you acted like you belonged there and held you hand out for a sniff Rocky would allow anyone to walk into our house.  He runs to the door barking though and how many people that aren't supposed to be there would really continue with 2 dobermans barking at them??? not many, but if they did, I wouldn't be shocked if my dogs allowed them into the house.  Our friends even say he looks scary when he greets them and they all know him well...

 

you mentioned someone hurting her - well I'd say that's completely different than entering your home. Studies have shown that most dogs will actually back off and let someone enter the house but allowing a stranger to physically hurt them I would think would trigger their natural defenses to kick in unless you have an extremely submissive dog. 

 

Keep in mind also that 8 months is still a BABY!  She is no where near having the instincts of an adult dog...if she's not barking at strange sounds in the garage I'd say you probably need to look into better security because she's not your answer right now.  She may never be that protective either...

 

Sniper's picture
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Sniper's picture
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I added a recent pic of her. She is still floppy and puppy-like so I agree that she is not going to be much protection for our house/garage. I do worry about someone hurting her to get in because they may sense her weakness/non-threatening nature as of now.

Lady Kate, I like your story. I read a few about dobermans having a sixth sense. I think that is really cool. I have always loved dogs and am quite shocked at how cuddly a Doberman can be!

Of course I do not want to raise an aggressive attack dog. But just curious if these dogs have a sense of evil or harm to their family and can distinguish when they should attack? Or can a Doberman remain floppy its entire life? I love their intimidating look (which is usually enough to get a stranger away). But I would hope that no one would hurt the dog to get in the yard or house.

Tayoh and I's picture
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At 8 months- there was no way Tayoh would've given anyone a second look, everyone was fair game to be leaned on.

That said, he's 14 months now, and he's starting to get protective. He'll bark at anything strange. He'll run to the edge of our property and 'watch' anything that doesn't belong close to our yard.

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At 8 months- there was no way Tayoh would've given anyone a second look, everyone was fair game to be leaned on.

That said, he's 14 months now, and he's starting to get protective. He'll bark at anything strange. He'll run to the edge of our property and 'watch' anything that doesn't belong close to our yard.

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Skyler, though a mix, has the doberman protectiveness. Honestly, she would let anyone in the house, but if they tried to hurt someone... Oh somebody would be dog-food. lol She didn't start showing her protectiveness till she was about 18 months, of course she never had "reason" to till then, so it could have happened sooner. 

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I have to say, I am a little disappointed in Harley.  Kevin left the house with the front door WIDE OPEN.  Fortunately, we have a swinging screen door, so none of the pups got out.  

Our neighbor called the police because she thought it was suspicious, and she reported that Harley was standing by the door howling.  Well, the sheriff came into the house, made sure everything was normal, and left his business card on the kitchen table.  Then he locked the door and left.

So Harley apparently lets people in. Complete strangers can come prancing in and he will just give them butt wiggles and kisses.  He is just too much of a snuggle muffin to be mean to anyone.

I guess it isn't a bad thing.  I recently had to hire a house-sitter during Thanksgiving and she was able to come in and take care of the goats, the dogs, and sleep there without a problem.  Her only issues is that Harley kept crawling closer and closer to her on the couch, until he was basically sitting on her.  

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I'm telling you HarleyBear, they think they're doing their job while they're trying to squish you.

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Hi, I have a couple of stories.

One about my Nana's doberman, Fran.  She was an adult dog in this story but it's still a good one.  My nana had arranged for the man to come and read the meter (which was in the house) at a specific time, well, the meter reader came early, he let himself into the house (they live on a farm and they were in the paddock next to the house so the door was open), Fran let the man come in, but, everytime he tried to edge to the door to leave she gave him the dober death stare accompanied by the low threatening growl.  Needless to say when my nana came back in - TWO HOURS later - he was still there, with his back to the wall!  Fran didn't attack him but made sure he wasn't going anyway!!!!

My other story is about Bella, last month (she was about 7 nearly 8 months old) my friend and I were walking along the river bank with Bella and her Llhasa when Bella stopped dead, right in front of me blocking my path, hackles were up and she was in full on growl mode.  There was quite a few bushes and the path went round a corner, so I told her good girl and moved her cautiously around the corner - where there was nothing but an empty path!  Once we moved passed that section of the path she settled down and went back to playing with Georgie (my friends llhasa). On the way back, we were approaching the same bit of the path and she started to slow down and blocking me again - so we walked cautiously around the corner again (expecting nothing) and there were three lads climbing out of the bushes with cans of beer (it was 8am BTW).  We walked passed, but we were very glad Bella was with us (even at that age she looked quite intimidating), she didn't bark or growl now she could see them but I did notice she kept herself between me and the lads and she didn't take her eyes off them once!

I know she's a bit young for her protective instinct to kick in fully but I have no doubt it will.

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Apollo, at a young age, was a little scary cat. He was afraid of our mini-schnauzer when we brought that pup home. I honestly thought Apollo would look at the schnauzer and see him self, and the schnauzer thought he was a dobie! Now, at a little over a year, Apollo isn't afraid of very many things. He is very protective of our house, our newborn baby and of course his best bud, Peanut the mini-schnauzer. Apollo once wrestled with a Heeler that was picking on Peanut while we were on a morning walk. He doesn't take well to aggressive dogs but loves to play with dogs who just wanna have fun. I think eventually the protectiveness will kick in, you jsut gotta be patient. I personally would rather want Apollo and Peanut crated if a burglar broke in just so nothing would happen to my pups.

Kim
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I agree with the replies in that protectiveness just come with the breed, and it's not something to worry about. All my Dobes and part-breds were very friendly dogs, but if they sensed something off about someone, or anyone had tried to harm me, it would have been another story!  Your girl is still a bit young to expect her to protect you from someone breaking into your house - it's up to you to protect her at this point. She's just too young. She may have some bluster that would maybe scare someone off, but if they were determined, I think she would cave. The whole confidence thing isn't there yet.

That said, your pup biting at your children is a whole different thing. Unacceptable behavior, in my book. Have you done any puppy/training classes with her? 

I totally disagree with the statement that "protectiveness comes with the breed" In fact most of the time it does not. There is a difference between a dog running to the property barking, being leery of strangers or certain things and actually being able to Protect you. I would like to add another prospective on protectiveness from watching several WAE's (working aptitude evaluations) Watching several of these put on and participating with my dogs I found them very eye opening. I truly believe that we are breeding out the natural protective instincts of our dogs. Most people want a golden retriever mentality in a Doberman body and that is exactly what we have for the most part in the US.

In the WAE they have a portion of the test where an aggressor comes out and goes after the dog and handler in an aggressive manner. This is the portion of the test where MOST Dobermans FAIL! They either hide behind their owner, turn to the side or show behaviors of avoidance. Very few pass the test. In the WAE where Paris earned hers along with her littermate Moe, they had 20+ dogs entered and only 4 of them passed 2 of those being my breeding. Mind you all a dog has to do to pass this portion is stay out in front of the owner and stand his ground.

Both of my dogs mother and son who earned their WAE were very strong on this portion of the test, not only did they stand their ground but they were very hard to hold back and wanted to kill the guy, aggressive barking and lunging at the leash. Both of them had a hard time in calming down after the fact which they also have to be able to do to pass this portion after the aggressor is gone. On another note the grandmother of these 2 would not pass the test and she is one that I thought for sure would. Her reaction when the aggressor came at us was to turn to the side and maybe they will go away lol. I feel very confident with the other 2 knowing they will protect no matter what. Further training in Schutzhund with my male and I know for sure even if the pressure is directly on him that he will not turn away and is in for the fight.

Many people think that their dog is protective and will protect them, the WAE test has shown more people that this is not the case. At our last WAE I helped with we actually opened it up to other breeds for the fun of it after our club sponsored WAE was over. That was very interesting as well, we had several GSD's a Belgian Terv's, and a Boerbel. These were all owned by well experienced owners who each thought their dogs had a protective instinct it surprised a lot of them.

Happydance's picture
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Wait a minute, she's biting at YOU when you're picking up your children???  I think there's some serious potentially dangerous issues here that need to be addressed.  Protective of the children or whatever, this behaviour should NEVER be allowed toward you!

Lady Kate's picture
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I totally missed that sentence..

 

However, when I pick up my infant child or my toddler, she seems to jump up on me and bite at them.

 

HappyDance is totally correct..never, under any circumstances should a dog nip at, bite or jump on family members.

Can you tell us some more...

I dont think that there is anything to worry about....HOWEVER, you need to stop this right away. If you pick up one of your kids and she does this INSTANTLY put your child down and CORRECT the dog. You need to let her know that this is not acceptable in any way shape or form. Depending on the dog this may mean just a firm grasp on the collar putting her in a down position telling her NO or it may mean you use a little harsher method. At any rate you need to put a stop on this right away.

Sniper's picture
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Yes she is biting at the kids when I pick them up. Even if she is laying and calm, the minute I pick them up she comes up to us and jumps up to nip at them. I am uncertain of how to handle it. I did not know if it was normal puppy behavior or something that needs a specific discipline technique to control.

A few times that I would sit on the floor, the dog was fine. But when my 10 month old came to crawl on my lap, the dog hurries up and blocks her off and sits on my lap first or tries to work her way between us. What does this mean?

However, when my daughter lays on the ground, sometimes the dog will just chill next to her, too. Not bite or hurt her, but just lay by her.

When I bring her to my mom's she always stands in front of me and blocks off my mother's boxer from approaching me. She stands as a shield between me and my mom's dog.

Not sure if any of this is actual protectiveness? And who is she protecting?

Lady Kate's picture
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Wow...had to do a search for this thread as something happened over the weekend that just terrified me, and I'm not sure what to do about it.

All of you know Sofia's story. The gentle DoberDiva who'd rather walk a block out of her way than step in a puddle.. who took a baby rabbit inside the house to give him a bath, and other tales of stoic behavior.

Well.....

Last Saturday we were in the states visiting our kids and grands.. took them to a park across the street to play. Sofia joined us and while laying down watching them and enjoying their antics like the grand dame she is.. All of sudden a homeless person started going through the trash and collecting tin cans to recycle.. she was up off her feet and with a growl that deafened all of us and a lurch that literally pulled me off my feet ( she was leashed) dragged me 10 feet to lunge at the guy. If it weren't for Mike's All American Linebacker experience ( he tackled her around her chest to keep her from eating this man) I don't know what would have happened. It was so quick and so scary, I was shaking from head to toe. Protective? wow.. there was no such thing as recall ( she couldn't have heard through the frenzy) and I'm not sure what to do about it.

One other time ( I wasn't there) she was in a dog park in SanDiego and a homeless guy was walking on the other side of the fence.. maybe 100 yards away.. she took off in a full blown charge and threw herself against the fence, taking 10 other dogs with her.. she hates homeless people.. now .... my concern is... did something awful happen to her when she was wandering the streets before rescue? Ordinarily ( in fact 100% of the time) she is happy to meet and greet, will go over to strangers,and if invited, will lean against them asking for a pat.. gentle and considerate of space toward other dogs and humans.. but guys.... this scared me. any thoughts or suggestions??

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Since Sofia wandered the streets for who knows how long before she came to live with you and Mike, she herself was homeless, and no doubt came in contact with other homeless creatures, 2 legged and 4 legged.  Very possibly, someone mistreated her during that era of her life, and this guy reminded her of a not so lovely time.  Who knows.  Wish they could just TELL us all the answers to our questions.

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Thanks Paul.. I totally agree..but this is NOT acceptable.. I've never seen her so fierce. I've seen her go after cats and squirrels with her normal prey drive, and her recall is getting better ( especially after she lost a toe nail, trying to scale a tree after one of the ferel cats.) but this was beyond any behavior I've ever witnessed and frankly I was terrified.

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Oh Sofia, just a little part of your history is being revealed to us!

My dogs don't like homeless people either.  It may be the way they walk, or smell, or maybe they can sense that they are just a little unstable, or maybe they can sense us getting nervous.  I don't know.  But Ellie (sweet Ellie) went off on two homeless people.  

Once Harley started barking at my Dad because he was hunting gophers (no stalking allowed at our house).  

It just could be a number of things... Still scary though

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I can only toss a theory here or there, homeless people usually don't walk with confidence, they have lots of clothing on which keeps their form from being recognizable as a human form, usually, and they have an odor of all the things they have come into contact with, you combine all of that and any dog would feel a bit insecure and react to it, it sounds like she went a bit overboard but she was also making sure that you were safe in the process, this was a threat to her and she was going to take it out......

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Lady Kate,I'm sorry your Diva scared you so bad but she really thought there was a threat and was gonna take care of her family!Who knows what she went thru while being homeless,we can't fix our rescues because we don't know the hell they went thru before they came into our lives but we can avoid situations where we know they will react as we learn them hopefully.As for Hoss and if he would protect me with all he had in him yeah boy he would,the other night I had to meet my husband at a store so he could give me medicine for my horse on his way thru it was dark of course,me and Hoss are waiting for him he pulls up mind you there is barely any light  he gets out comes around the front of his semi and all Hoss see's is a tall person comeing to my truck no growl he just got this look in his eye and my widow was down but thank god I was paying attention because Hoss was goin over me and thru the window to get this person who dared to acost his momma!Also ever since I brought Hoss home he hates my stepfather with a passion thank god he has great recall(which was beat and shocked into him by his previous owner may they rot in hell)he has went after him a time or to thank god I was there or Hoss would of attacked him there is no doubt in my mind,now whenever I'm at moms Hoss will just stay between me and the stepdad and stare him down he does the same thing with my mom he will protect her to course maybe Hoss knows I can't stand the man,and yes I truelly believe dogs can sense evil or a person that has a bad intent to do harm.Mackerboy wouldn't hurt a fly he would of probably helped them carry stuff out Hoss on the other hand would protect his home with his life.                 Dodie & Hoss

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Thanks everyone.. you've certainly made me feel a lot better. \

The lesson I'm coming away with is this.. Be even MORE aware of our surrouondings..Be even MORE aware of her body language. She's really very good at redirection and recall IF I start it soon enough..before she gets in the DoberZone. One of which I am proud of and wouldn;t trade for anything.. just need to harness it.

Love you guys

Kate and Kujo

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 I tend to lean towards that it is in their DNA, most dogs not just dobermans. Sure they have been toned down recently but deep down they are still guard/hunting dogs. My two are cuddle bugs and all of the normal Velcro descriptions that accompany our breed; but I know they are protective of my family and me. Between the two I would say that hazel seems more alert and has no qualms about getting between us and anything perceived as a danger. Dexter is protective as well but he seems to take more to draw it out; such as a stranger walking up to us in the yard, or if he hears the kids crying, I guess he seems to be prompted into defensive mode; while hazel is a mother hen ever vigilant and on the watch. Dexter does keep an eye out for anything out of the norm but hazel is always a step ahead of him and me for that matter. I worry that if we do get our home broken into I will end up being sued because they would chew up a stranger who came in un-announced. We have some local “up to no good kids” who have had 2 close calls with my pups. The first was when they jumped my fence and were picking apples from my trees and chucking them into my next door neighbors  yard, pool and WINDOWS! I didn’t even know they were back there but Hazel was trying to open the back door like she needed to use the bathroom and as soon as I unlocked the deadbolt she tore out there like a lightning bolt screaming a war cry that was deafening. Lets just say they managed to get out of my yard before she got a hold of them but they NEVER returned to my yard.

I have mentioned before that I live across the street from a park and a bus-stop for small school children. Hazel and Dex look forward to when the children get out of school. One day my son and his friend were getting bullied by some older kids (same ones mentioned earlier) and he started to cry because they were hitting him. They BOTH jumped my fence and bee lined across the street and sent the kids up a tree! Now they didn’t hurt the kids but they sure as hell scared them to death. Both times I was worried they would hurt someone, neither time they did.

 

I guess long story short, most dogs not just our dobermans seem to be protective. I think they all have different levels or triggers to set them in motion. I think Harley didn’t go after the cop because he knew he was not there to cause trouble. Just like my pups never charge school kids who cry out when hurt or in laughter. They just seem to know more about a given situation than we like to think.

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I agree with the theory that it's in their DNA since Friedrich Doberman (the inventor of the breed) was looking to design a breed of dog that would be protective, but loyal and loving at the same time. Friedrich Doberman needed a protective dog since he was a tax collector in Germany in the late 1800's. So I would say yes, it's in their DNA, but I hear that doberman pinschers nowadays are being bred with a more loving nature as opposed to the protective one.

My dobie, Zeus is just over a year old now and he's showing protective behaviours towards strangers - that's only if they approach us in a way that he doesn't like (like staring at him, or walking slowly and suspiciously). There's been a couple of times where my dad tried sneaking up on my mom and he freaked out. But when he realized it was my dad sneaking up on her, he calmed right down and started licking his hand.

Anyway, dobies do have a bit of a protective nature, but they shouldn't be trying to nip at children let alone you. All of the dobies I know seem to get along with children really well. I'm sensing a jealousy issue here where she wants your attention instead of you focusing your attention on the kids. Make sure you correct that ASAP!

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I think most people would be surprised by how their dogs act in a REAL situation...  Your average dog owner believes with all their heart that their dog will protect them...  The reality is, the vast majority of dogs WILL NOT.  Most dogs that are not trained to handle this type of stress will shut down...  some may bark, but someone that's not afraid of dogs can easily shut them down.  I would never, ever rely on an untrained dog for any amount of protection besides a visual deterrant.

Kevin I totally agree and have shared this many times in the past. People often confuse their dogs suspicious behavior as being protective. MOST of the time if pressure is put on the dog without proper training the dog will back off or shut down. This is very evident watching the training that goes on in Schutzhund. Very few have what it takes to move through a bad situation.

Yes they were originally bred for protection but we live in a country that does not do well with the true nature of the breed and what it was bred for. For the most part we want our Dobermans to behave like a Golden Retriever dog but look like a Doberman.

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Bugs has a very protective nature and does this thing, its hard to explain... she just has a change in body posture and stance when she senses something amiss. She is only 7 months old so who knows how strong the instinct will be. I don't train my dogs for personal protection but I do like the visual deterrant. Its unlikely that anyone will bother me or my kids with two dobermans trotting beside us, but then you never know.

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I agree with Kevin and Rnd, the reactions that we as humans preceive as "protective" of us are really the dogs way of saying they are nervous and frightened to some degree not necessarily "bring it on" attitude......I know just raising my voice in excitement or yelling at a cat for fighting here in my house sends Ben the rottweiler running down the hall to his bed and he won't come out until everything is quiet again and then he only comes halfway down the hall and looks at me to see if I am done with my tirade hahahaa.....and today a strange repairman walked through our front yard and where Ben normally goes ape about someone outside our fence he just barked ONCE and went to his chew bone and laid down to gnaw, so much for "big scary rottie".....I do not believe for one minute that Ben would protect me from anything, I would be protecting him!!! my cats would be more likely to attack and intruder than Ben.....so never take for granted that your dog has protective behaviour for you, most likely they are posturing to figure out if they should run and hide

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I agree that with our rescues we just do not know what terrors they went through before they came to us.  My Bella, while aggressive towards other animals is totally loving with all humans...but...with a couple of exceptions which have no logical explanation.  Several harmless ladies who we meet on our morning walks (and see nearly every day)...she hates.  And Lady Kate, if I am not totally aware and careful, she will pull me off my feet going after them as well.  The rest of the time she is a pussy cat.  These ladies seem harmless in my opinion, but who knows what memories they might awaken in my poor Bella.  You just have to always be aware.  And yes, they do have their protective streak and in my opinion, would give up their lives for their loved ones.  I believe all dobermans have that in their DNA. 

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Des, I like to call it "a lab in a dobe's body" lol

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Kay won't let anybody in the house. My neighbour of four years, who was here before Kay was even born, got away lucky a few times. He thought it was cool to walk in the back gate without any warning, despite being told I have a doorbell at the front for a reason. Kay had him cornered by the chickens the last time he did it.

I don't generally have people over at the house. I sometimes bring one friend in for a few hours, but having people over isn't something I enjoy doing, so none of the dogs are comfortable with strangers coming in.

A few months ago, I was walking with Kay at the park. A woman came up to us without any restrictions. She just sort of stormed up to us and got right close. It made me really uncomfortable. As I took a step back, Kay took a jump forward. It was lucky she was on the lead. The woman didn't even flinch. Kay went mad, and the lady just kept talking to me as if nothing was happening! She even tried to move round the dog to get closer so I could hear her better.

I was walking around the bridleway late last year, and a guy was maintaining it and pulling up the weeds. A generally creepy guy with a massive scythe, and there nobody else was around. He stopped me to chat, and did the usual "take up all personal space" thing. The one time I'd have fully appreciated Kays' loud bark and scary look, and all she did was sit there wagging her tail and squinting her eyes at him.

I've been doing some research into her pedigree recently, and found she's got a lot of good protection dogs in there. It was interesting to actually look back and see the dogs as well as the titles. I've only gone looked back over her dads' side, so I'll have to have a dig around at her mums' as well. Just for kicks... ;)

I think she'd have the potential to be a good protection dog if I put the effort, money and training into it. I just don't think I'd have the ability to handle a good protection dog. I'll stick with the basic mugger-deterrent training that I like to call "anti-social dog". It's unlikely I'll ever need her to protect me. I'd rather she didn't, tbh. Having to deal with dog/person bites isn't my idea of a lucky getaway.

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Too early to tell about Echo's nature, hopefully she will remain sweet and unthreatening the rest of her life.  As stated earlier, a person that is not afraid and knows dogs will always be able to overcome even a well trained attack dog.  They probably won't get away scott free without injury, but they will live and it's likely the expensive and well trained attack dog will not.

If it has teeth it will bite, it is as simple as that, you can only hope it never happens and if it does ... you do not lose your dog to the county and your house and income in a lawsuit.

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I do believe there is a "protective" or maybe more accurately "watchful" nature in dobies.  They want to do something, but just don't know how without the training.

Lil Mama has exhibited this a couple times.  Normally she is the love of the neighborhood.  In her world there are no strangers and she will approach anyone who is willing to show her love.  But, while out on our walks, she will place herself between me and a group of people walking towards us.  She will sit in front of me and not move until they have passed.  Even if they are across the street.  Once gone, she will continue walking.  If it is just one or two, she will ignore them unless close enough to that she can coax a few pets out of them.  The only time she doesn't do this is when we are walking at a favorite community park where there are many people out walking their dogs, pushing strollers, jogging, biking, etc.

Another time, we were are the dog park and there was a pitbull pup there for the first time.  The pup was nervous and hesitant around strangers.  Wanting to approach, but backing off and barking.  I was squating trying to encourage him to come to me so I could pet him.  When the pup would begin to hesitantly approach and start to bark, Lil Mama got between us and she redircted the pup.  I thought she was just wanting to play with him, but once redirected, she just walked away from him.  She repeated this each time the pup started to bark at me.  I think she knew I wasn't in danger, but didn't like her mom being barked at by a young whipper snapper.

dobie822's picture
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Joined: 2017-01-09

Will my dobies protect me?  I don't think so...  Jack is 6 yrs. old and weighs 140 lbs (not a warlock, just a big fluke of nature) and Lola is 4 yrs. old and weighs 85 lbs.  Both are very friendly, nonagressive dogs, loved by all.  We've never even heard Jack growl before.  Jack wants nothing to do with drama and prefers to let Lola "handle things" instead, and he will actually hide behind me at any hint of potential trouble. While both will bark if someone approaches the house (i.e. comes to the door), they are also quick to quiet down.  We live in the country and my dobes are always excited to welcome visitors.  It's like "Yes!! City folk!!" and if a child visits, that's just a bonus!  I only weigh 100 lbs. and I have spoken to my vet about my concern that if I were walking down the street with Jack and were assaulted, that Jack would just stand there and watch, or worse yet run away from the situation with his tail tucked between his legs leaving me alone.  My vet laughed hard and said "Honey, it doesn't matter what Jack would do because if a potential attacker saw you walking down the street with Jack, he wouldn't even go near you!"  He may be right, but I'm not so sure.  I still anticipate the day when I come home to an empty house and see Lola and Jack sitting where my couch used to be, then looking up at me to say "Bummer, man, you got ripped off while you were gone...."