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ArtPeltier's picture
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Joined: 2013-09-20

We have a 12 week old male male pup. He's housebroken, crate trained and works well on a leash. He also has basic commands of sit stay and down. The only MAJOR problem is his biting, and I know he is teething. He was the largest of the litter and the dominant puppy of the litter. 

When he goes into his biting frenzy as we call it nothing will stop him. We have tried putting toys in his mouth as soon as he bites, using a chill bone, doesn't like it, spraying our selfs with the no bite yuck bitter apple spray, turning our back to him all no good. Yelping loudly when he bites also makes hi bite more. The only thing that works a little bit is leaving room. He only has one room privilege where his crate is and outside deck with supervision. 

I have heard that another way to stop biting is to grasp him by the scruff of neck and hold him down on floor imitating his mother or a dominant dog while saying no bite. After you hear or feel a sigh it's a sigh Of submission and the pup gives in. Has anyone used or recommend this? 

Any and all help is greatly appreciated!

"I have heard that another way to stop biting is to grasp him by the scruff of neck and hold him down on floor imitating his mother or a dominant dog while saying no bite. After you hear or feel a sigh it's a sigh Of submission and the pup gives in. Has anyone used or recommend this?" Don't do this.

Try this. You said he does well with his sits, downs and stays. When you notice he's starting his "biting frenzy", start working with his obedience. (Side note: I cut up hotdogs about as thick as a nickel to use as rewards. Whether the expensive ones or the cheap ones, it's your call. He will consider the hotdog slices as HIGH VALUE, better than any store bought doggie treat.) Sit, put a slice in your hand so he can't get it but can smell it and use his nose to guide him into position, when his but hits the ground, feed him. Mark the second (not before, not after) he sits (the behavior) with the food and a word or if you want a clicker. If you miss your timing, don't do anything and try again. Same with his down. Proper position, feed him. Put some slices in your mouth, every time he gives you eye to eye contact, spit one out to him (this builds focus) no need to put a word to this. He looks at you, you feed him. It also works quite well with "healing". Guide him around with his nose and when he is in healing position, slip him a slice.  This is the "redirecting" you're looking for.

Get a good tug toy. Find them online. Google Schutzhund equipment/ toys. This toy will only be out when you play with him. You don't let it lay around and when your done and he drops it, put it up. You'll want him to think when he sees that toy,"ALRIGHT!!!!WE GONNA PLAY!!!!!! Also never play til "he" quits. Always leave him wanting more.

After about 5 to 10 minutes of OB, play tug of war with him with his special toy. And yes, let him win. The game is not about the toy, the game is about you and him playing and for it to be fun he has to win. One day this toy will be your dog's reward. Think about it like this, two little league teams, one that wins all the time and one that loses all the time. Which team wants to go to the game? Happy willing dogs are so much prettier than compliant dogs.

He'll start to put two and two together and instead of him going into "bite frenzy" mode he'll go into sit, stand, down, stay mode in front of you trying to get fed or played with. Just takes a little time. You want to be the fun guy, not the bully. I don't use corrections until the dog is 5 to 6 months old and I'm sure he understands what I want of him.

Gunny

Tannaidhe's picture
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Joined: 2013-02-25

The yelping is extremely effective...  at teaching them how hard is 'too hard'.  It's not so great at teaching them not to bite at all.  For that, you need a combination of ignoring the unwanted behavior (if it is not rewarded in any way, even ways you think are 'negative', the behavior will eventually stop) and redirecting to acceptable behavior.  Redirecting works even better if you can pick up on 'warning signs' and redirect before he actually starts biting.  Gun_slinger outlined ways to redirect quite nicely :)

The problem with "yelping" to get the dog to stop biting is if you have a drivier dog, which this sounds like and the OP has stated, it will hype the dog up not down. The dog sees it like he's catching the rabbit. The rabbit squeals when trying to get away, dog bites/trys harder to kill the rabbit. Don't get me wrong, I think this is a great attribute in an dog. We want to tap into their drives not suppress them and use those drives to our advantage. The drives we want to tap into are food drive, prey drive and defense drive.

So we take that gnawing on us (prey drive), redirect to the dogs OB (food drive) and when he gives us what we want, we give him what he wants, the "rabbit", in the form of tug of war (prey drive) and the dog winning the game. Everyone ends up being a happy camper.

The only drawback to this is as the dog gets bigger and stronger the game, to us, gets harder but we're all looking for a good workout right?..lol

Gunny

Ingusiux's picture
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Joined: 2013-07-18

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Hi! I also had the same problem.. But our dog trainer told me just to take the dog out of the room (place where the dog do not want to be alone and it has to be borring place to him) for 5- 7 min. Then let him in and ignore him. If the dog do the same again repeat it again and again (5-7 times). The most important do not do any fast moves. Do everything very slow and do not look to him. After saying "NO" take him for a collar and take him out. It helped to me, but of course it take time to teach him. :)

Kingston's picture
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Joined: 2013-10-07

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 I am going through the same thing with my 10 week old pup, his biting is out of control, I can handle it but my 4 year old gets scared and cries, i will be trying all of the suggestions given on here to try to stop this biting. 

KevinK's picture
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Joined: 2010-07-15

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I have always used simple re-direction with great results.  Dog tries to bite, replace your leg with a toy, praise, make a big deal, rinse/repeat.  Puppies don't always learn in a day, sometimes we have to be patient.  Spray bottles, and other deterrants will work for less drivey dogs, try shaking a jar of coins, or spraying my girl with some water and see what happens... 10 bucks says she gets MORE hyper lol.  

 

Puppy biting is 100% normal, and the better you are at re-directing the behavior, the quicker it will stop.

Bearshade's picture
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Joined: 2013-08-24

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I agree with KevinK.  re-direct, re-direct, re-direct!  and praise for chewing  the toy.  they will learn that the toy if way more fun to chew.  It can be hard on young children when their furry pal wants to play with their teeth.  Dobies  are smart and the work put in now will be well worth it when you see how much they return all that love to you.

ArtPeltier's picture
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Joined: 2013-09-20

Biting update: 

Radar is now 17 weeks old and getting so big! Time flies so fast! He is loosing teeth and getting his new ones in so fast! The biting has slowed and is only due to teething problems, which we can handle. He's housebroken, crate trained and walks well on a leash! For the most part he's a well behaved doberman pup. He's had level one puppy training and on his way to an advanced school. When your retired you can spend a lot of time training and being with your pup! 

Thank all of you who helped us out and keep in touch. We'll continue to post pictures of him as he grows and I'm sure we'll have future questions,

thanks Radars family

Buddha's picture
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Joined: 2013-01-08

My Doberman never bit, one of the reasons I took him. My little dog on the other hand was a biting machine! Grasping the mouth tightly and not letting go until there's no whining or struggle, if you let go only to have the dog wag it's tail and try and bite again, they obviously didn't get the message. So grasp the mouth shut again, don't grab but press down on the neck moving the dog into a down position, this is asserting your dominance. This should stop the behavior, other submissive exercises are down stay, rolling the puppy on its back with one hand on its chest, tummy up, wait until there is no struggling only relaxing keep held down for different amounts of time every time you do it, this teaches the dog he can't get up until it's okay with you, also teaches patience. If the biting persists past 4 months I'd say you have a problem as your dog will grow fast. I got my Doberman at 2 months, 22lbs now at 1 year 2 months he's toppling 75lbs and stands 30" at the shoulder! I'm glad my boy never bit. One last thing everyone that comes in contact with your dog MUST handle the biting in the same way, this teaches that humans, all of them, unless posing a threat is dominant over the dog. Good luck, look forward to seeing your reply.