Afraid to go outside

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yohoe's picture
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Joined: 2011-08-03

I got my pup 4 days ago (10 weeks old) and he was great up until today.  He would go outside readily, never go to the bathroom inside, and smelled everything and everyone.  We went on hour long walks a couple times per day and always played with him inside.


Today, he has peed inside 4 times and pooped once inside.  He won't even budge outside!  I took him outside a couple times because he gave clues he wanted to pee but when he got past the door, he would sit or lay down to prevent him to move.  I got him up but he would never go to his normal pee spot or be able to get him off the property.  He would sit and watch/listen to everything.  People talking, cars going by, dogs barking, etc.  He would sit, listen, not go to the bathroom, then he would come inside and pee a couple minutes later.


He was awesome with going outside but now it seems like he never wants anymore but if I do get him outside, he does everything to not move and/or just sit and listen.


Any words of advice would be great!

missdoglover's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-20

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Being outside is a whole new world to him. He is still young and has a lot of learning to do. Make sure you don't force him outside, you don't want to tramlized him. Make going outside pleasureable and fun. Coax him with chicken or some yummy treats and try going outside first and clap your hands wave your hands and make yourself fun! Hope this helps. I'm a little braindead tonight!

Karissa

bbroyles's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-09

I agree with Karissa, can you make eye contact with him?  Teach him to look at you by holding a yummy treat close to your face/chest.  When he looks, reward and praise.  Get some focus back on what youre doing.  Also, I think hour long walks are a bit too much for such a young boy.  Could be his paws or joints are feeling some pain.  And you shouldn't take him away from his home yard until he has received all of his vaccinations.  He can pick up a number of deadly virus, until he has the full course of innoculations.  Please read the "Parvo- Why we vaccinate" Thread. Very important and critical info there!  

Control_Freak's picture
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Not only is it super important to vaccinate taking a young pup for such long walks several times a day is just too much excercise, they need to work up to it just like us.  Their muscles aren't developed yet and that kind of excerise .

scotty's picture
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I agree with bbroyles, 10 weeks is far too young for an hour long walk twice a day for a puppy.   Puppies need much less exercise than fully-grown dogs. If you over-exercise a growing puppy you can overtire it and damage its developing joints, causing early arthritis. We have always used the rule of thumb of a ratio of five minutes exercise per month of age (up to twice a day) until the puppy is fully grown, i.e. 15 minutes when three months old, 20 minutes when four months old etc. Once they are fully grown, they can go out for much longer.     This is what we have done with our Dobe Cleo who is now nine months old.   She also gets lots of playtime and training  in our garden  but find that mental stimulation - obedience training - tires her out more than her walks.   But again this should be little and often as they switch off quickly when young.   Don't get frustrated, keep calm and make it fun for you both.

Once your pup has his vaccinations I would recommend you find an obedience class to join as, apart from the training which dobermans love and do really well at,  the socialisation with other dogs is so important .  

Good luck

yohoe's picture
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Joined: 2011-08-03

Thanks for all the replies.

He's had 2 sets of vac and the vet say it's ok to walk him but I should wait for the 3rd?  He will be starting obedience classes in a week and a half and the trainer (private, not commercial) didn't say anything about him unable for the group class.

What's funny is he tires out towards the end of the walk but as soon as he steps foot in the house, he wont stop bouncing/jumping around like a mad-man for as long as he wants.  I thought walks are supposed to tire them out!

An update to not wanting to go outside:

I got him out this morning and he peed right away and started on a small walk (as I read, you should walk him right after because you don't want him to think it's bathroom time then right back inside or else he will hold it so he can get max play time outside).  We got a block before he heard 2 dogs barking in the distance then he sat down, stared into the distance, then ran as fast as he could back to the house.  Once we were back in the house, I saw him sniffing around and he got into the squating position but I was able to take him outside before anything happened. After a half hour of being in the front yard (sitting/watching/listing/smelling around), he didn't poop.

Lady Kate's picture
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Joined: 2009-10-28

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I believe I read something about the fear stages pups experieince and if I'm right, it's usually around 10 weeks.. Stay with it Yohoe... it just might be one of many stages our doberkids go through ( taking you right along with them     )

jeshykai's picture
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Your vet shouldn't have said he was okay to walk, not only because of his age but because he isn't fully vaccinated.  You should finish your series at 16 weeks - and then you can do, as already suggested, the 20 minute walk.  Your pup isn't ready for walks at this age - too much growing going on.  He also will not learn how to focus on you as much because of all that stimulation!

Make yourself more fun than the environment, enrich your dog with toys, training, and treats.  Find what makes the puppy tick and use that to help bond.  With Steve - it was all about chase!  I'd run away from him in the yard and he'd come tackling my feet.  He's 96lbs now and STILL loves this game.

Potty training takes tons and tons of time.  The rule of potty training is -- if they wake up from a nap, outside to pee.  If they take a break in a long bout of play - rush them out!  They're going to pee!  They drink water.. out you go.. they eat.. out you go again.  I take my puppies out every 30-45 minutes to go to the bathroom regardless of their activity but I watch them like a hawk for any of the other mentioned reasons to go out.  Don't punish at this age for in the house, an "ah-ah" and pick up to outside is best.  Reward reward reward when going in the proper place!  Some dogs learn faster than others, it all depends.  Stick with it - you'll get there.

Welcome to the Forum, btw.

Control_Freak's picture
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Jes- 96 lbs of muscles tackling your feet!?  lol

jeshykai's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-02

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No!  I'd be one flattened pregnant lady then!  His game now is refined!  We play chase until he heels at my side, sits, and gets petted.  :)

von Cosack Dobermann (not verified)
von Cosack Dobermann's picture

Clear the vaccines before you venture out to be safe. I teether or use a 25ft lightweight lead with a lightweight flat collar in the house. I'm very intuned to the pups body language and if I miss I get the pup right back to the spot he/she messes and correct them vocally and use the scruft of the neck to hold and turn the pup physically to me and give an energy thats emotionally strong and serious. I then get the pup outside immediately and change my vibe to the leader and have the pup follow me. I prefer the long lead being dragged around to gain household manners, I don't use crates so my goal is to house train at a very young age so theres no need for the cages. I also incorperate corrections at a young age so that my verbal command is acompanied with a physical correction. Puppies are not gonna read your verbal and recognize body langauge when their very young, so the tug to gain focus is the best way to get early results and reinforce your vocal control. Puppy proof the house and sart out with limited access, incorperate Boundries & Limitation along with NILF without going off the deep end. I don't teach my puppies they have to sit still before they eat. If theres a problem you can incorperate that type of control but if theres no problems I don't use the military type of approach.

Your OB training goes far beyond sit,stay,down & come. Teaching a vocabulary takes time and reinforcement, house training needs to be handled with deliberation I don't believe you need to catch the pup in the act!!! If you bring a pup/dog to the spot in question you can give your verbal command with a physical correction and they certainly will know exactly what its all about.

Now this correction is ofcourse using the appropriate amount of quickness and force. With young pups my preference is also the scruft but the leash to collor correction becomes appropriate with 16 week old pups and up.

I use all methods in training dogs and I find reinforcement and compulsion works best with Dobermanns. There are exceptions when both of these methods need to be altered or eliminated. A dog with weak tolerences obviously is not going to handle corrections well, and a stubborn to dominate animal may not pay much attention to reinforement. This is why one way trainers fail when they venture into the mainstream of the dog world and experienced the pet breeds and the working lines.

Stay focused on your pup and be ready for failure when it comes gets your commands and corrections in and then move on to showing the pup were to go. I do prefer a pup learning to go when on their walk but that seems to have been replaced with using the yard. The yard in many respects is the same as the house to canines and does add to the confussion with house training. Thats another topic in regards to dogs needing to venture out and travel and why the yard doesn't apply in that situation.

                                        good luck and "train em up" 24/7 for life...Von.