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howsefrau32's picture
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Joined: 2008-06-27

http://www.gentledoberman.com/forum

I probably have the answer to my question after reading some great information here, but I am still a little worried about the biting our puppy Greta has been doing to us. She got my husband pretty good yesterday, he was throwing a ball in the back yard, she got too excited, and she started jumping up and biting him all over his arms and would not back down no matter how many times he said no. My 14 year old was running to grab the phone last night and she ran after her and got her shirt and bit a hole through her shirt, luckily she didn't get my daughter. She started to do it to me last night when we were outside and I told her "no" and went inside. She seems to listen to me more than anyone else, I guess because I am around her the most.  We are giving her a sharp "no" and then giving her a toy to chew, so is that all we can do to discourage this? How long does it usually take before they get this and learn that this biting hurts?

howsefrau32's picture
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Joined: 2008-06-27

Here is a picture of Greta, the little pirhana.

AlphaAdmin's picture
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Joined: 2010-01-18

Pet Profiles

Hi howsefrau32, good work attaching you puppy profile, that helps.

You have more problems than bitting. She's jumping up too. Neither of these behaviors are acceptable.

All she's doing is treating everyone like she would her litter mates and nanny-dogs. If a dog doesn't feel like this kind of treatment, it will give the puppy a correction, usually a sharp bark and maybe a pinch or shove with the muzzle.

You need to do something similar. She's too young for any type of physical correction of course. I think you need to make your 'NO' much sharper. Don't be afraid to come down on her hard! It's good for her.

Next time she jumps or bites, stand tall leaning over her and just let her have a really mean "NO-BITE" or "NO-JUMP". If profanity slips in don't feel ashamed.  ;)

If the jumping or bitting accrued during play or affection, stop and ignore her. She needs to learn that jumping or bitting will result in instantly getting barked at and then getting ignored.

Don't expect this behavior to take time to fix or for her to grow out of it. You need to stop it cold - well before she starts to outweight you holding helium balloons.

Personally, I don't give a puppy a thing, not a scrap of food or bit of affection unless they stick their little but and all four paws flat on the ground and look me in the eye. Even out worse rescues have learned this quick. Stannly, a serious goofball rescue, would dance around in frount of me trying to get control of himselfe untill he sat his butt down like he was pushing down a spring.

The three Dobermans we have now know what to do. It freaks people out sometimes, but they'll run around the yard like crazy horses then gently sit themselves next to you looking up. You can give them a pet or tell them to get lost.

howsefrau32's picture
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Joined: 2008-06-27

Thank you for the quick reply.  I am so glad to hear your opinion, because it sounds an awful lot like the way my husband wants to handle it, and it reassures me to hear that he is on the right track.  She actually has done better today.  She attempted to bite again, and my husband held her still and gave her a very sharp "no".  She has not tried to repeat it again, though the day is not over, but I think she is getting it.  When we played outside today, I was ready for her to try it again, and this time she avoided our hands altogether.  Hopefully she will do the same when we take her outside to play after dinner.  Thanks again for your quick response.  I really have gained a lot from reading through the other posts.  Glad to have this to turn to for some good advice from someone who knows this breed.

Thanks

AlphaAdmin's picture
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You're welcome - and thanks!

Your husband does have the right idea. Holding her still is good too, it's a lot like how the mother corrects the puppies. With older (bigger) dogs I like to hold their muzzle when I scold them. It's a lot like how dominate dogs assert their authority by bitting (gently, usually affectionate) the muzzle and head.

Just be sure not to inflict any kind of pain or trauma on her at this age. At 13 weeks she's just coming out of the fear imprint period. She would not experience physical correction until 6-months of age.