Posting/Taping Methods?

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BlueNemo's picture
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OK so I am on my third Dobie now. All 3 were cropped with a laser, the first 2 were posted using my vet's method, which seems to be the most popular. Tampons wrapped in cloth tape, stuck down into the ear, and then the whole thing is wrapped with tape, plus a bridge in between.

So I found this article on Altobello's website about an ear rack, and got looking around, and found the ear halo website. It looked like a great idea but they wanted $100 for it! I showed a picture of it to my boss and he made me 5 of them for free lol. I had my new girl's ears cropped and the vet taped them, but 2 days later when  it was time to change the tape, I put the rack on her instead, and I can't belive how much better it is! The taping covers the ear edge, makes it scabby and wet and slimy and gross, the tampon muffles the dogs hearing, when you remove the tape, you rip out the dogs hair on her ear, I could go on. With the rack, the edge is open to the air, which heals it faster and keeps it dry. The other 2 Dobies keep her edges and inner ear clean and free from debris. The rack only weighs about 3oz. And being stretched up all the time prevents scar crimping or curling! Here's my girl in her rack:

And 4 days after crop:

everytime we have had a litter cropped the edges of the ear where they are sutured have been left open not covered by tape. This is to help them to heal. They are originally glued up on cups and there hasn't been a need to take them down before the stitches are removed. There is no way you should be using typical wrapping methods BEFORE the stitches are removed. Visit the DPCA website to see several various ways to wrap ears. Also, their is more ways then one to take tape off that is less damaging to the puppy. No need to rip hair off. As you will learn from the articles with step by step pictures many methods don't involve sticking things deep inside the ear.

I was just looking at the picture again of this ear wrapping method and wanted to mention another draw back to it. He must have bumped his ear on something in the picture with them down as he has blood dripping off the tip. I like the theory behind it but the brace is not at all forgiving and more cumbersome to the dog attached to it. Example would be with this type of wrapping you have no give so if the dog runs or bumps into something as they all do it hurts and stretches the ears. As you progress in taping you want the dog to be able to use his ears not be stuck in one position.

One of the newer methods uses the foam backer rod stuff used in windows. Very comfortable to the dog it is not put down into the ear so the air can ciruculate you don't need to change the wraps as often as if you were using the tampon in the ear or any other method that involves putting it down in the ear. Here is a link that shows how to wrap the pictures aren't quite as clear as they could be but gives a great example of how it is to look. http://www.dpca.org/BreedEd/ears13.htm  I used this with my last female with a beautiful long show crop and it worked wonders.

BlueNemo's picture
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Joined: 2008-07-22

The reason there was blood dripping from the tips, it was after my first time ever using the rack, and I didn't know you weren't supposed to leave the edge open all the way to the tip, so when I unwrapped, the tape ripped the scab off at the top 1" or so, making it bleed. After that I did it right, and end result:

They are standing very nicely. Are you training with the invisible fence? If so how is it going? The reason I ask is it looks like the other collar she is wearing is the stimulator for the invisible fence. I'd like to try it in the front yard.

BlueNemo's picture
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Yea her ears are standing beutifully, I posted using the euro style rack and they stood in 6 weeks, they were cropped at 19 week old!

I have all 3 of my Dobes and my Boxer in my invisable fence and it works great. Very very seldom they run thru, get the stimulation, yelp and immediately cower and run back into the yard, getting the 2nd shock and a double reinforcement to stay in the yard. (The only time they ever run through is like, for instance, if I take one dog out to go for a walk or go bye bye, another one or two may try to follow. Otherwise, maybe if they're playing and they get too close to the boundary.) I heard one person say the fence worked good on their Dobes as puppies but once they hit a year old they ran through and barely felt it. My male is 14 months and my females are 10 and 6 months and it works great on them, as well as my 6 month old Boxer. Any other questions, feel free to ask!

Wow, I'm really shocked that they stood that well for having them done at 19 weeks old!Most vets will tell you that is to late.

So on the fence do they have different stimulation levels or is just one for all?

BlueNemo's picture
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Joined: 2008-07-22

The stubborn reciever collars I use have 5 levels including vibrate only. I set mine on highest level first, instead of a lower level and gradually building up as they got older, therefore allowing them to get used to it and ignore it. No problems with it so far!

So is it the same stimulation as a regular electric collar? Did you try the highest level on yourself to see how high it was? Sounds funny but you have heard of people doing this with regular electric collars. I'd be afraid it would be to much but I can see your point of them possibly ignoring the other, I just don't know if I would be comfortable with it full blast.

BlueNemo's picture
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Well, I did try the regualr collar on myself, it startled me but didn't really hurt. With the stubborn receivers, the level 5 stimulation is much higher, and while that may make you uncomfortable, think of this:
If you train them right and they never leave the yard, they never get shocked. If they try to leave, would you rather a little tickle as a correction for leaving the property, or would you rather a big shock that sends them yelping back into the yard with a lesson learned. They are much less likely to try leaving again if the memory of it is a negative memory. Your choice:  Strong correction, safe and happy dog, or weak correction, possibly dead dog, hit by car, stolen, picked up by animal control, attacked by strays, etc...
Mine have all had the strongest possible correction BTW, and although they ran back into the yard yelping, 5 seconds later they were back playing and chewing on their toys and forgot all about it, even my 6 month old pups...

I see where you are coming from and the reasoning behind it. I think for me personally I would probably be the wimp that would start with the vibrate. What type of training is done before the collar is worn and they are shocked for going near the area? I would assume that boundaries are taught or shown in some manner or another? Did you install the fence system yourself or was it a company that did it?

BlueNemo's picture
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I installed the fence myself. The training mauel that comes with the fence will tell you to start with no collar and work on a leash to teach them with the flags first. I did not do that. What I did, and it worked for me, I set up a stake and cable to where the snap would just lay on top of the boundary wire. I just left the dog out there alone. Dobes are super intellegent and my "kids" quickly learned, without associating me with the shock, that just past those flags was a boundary they weren't supposed to cross. The cable enabled them to reach the boundary and recieve the correction but not run through, so they never figured out that the shock only lasted a second. Even when I was training my puppies to it, it never scared them, they treated it like a fence. They ran into it once or twice, realized they couldn't pass through it, and stopped trying. No trauma, no fear, no bad associations with me or with being outside, since their area is about 2 acres total. I don't recommend being a wimp and only using vibrate, you will only confuse your dog and lead to it eascaping when you're not around, being stolen, hit by car, etc. Be firm! I know if you have Dobes, you are a pack leader and know how to be firm and in charge. Keep in mind once they are trained, they will never get shocked!

Since this is an area that is so often looked at I wanted to add some links for those of you that need visuals when taping. This is just a short list but will give you great pictures and tried and true methods of posting.
http://www.dpca.org/BreedEd/PDF/Auch_Ear_Taping.pdf
http://misteldobermans.com/earwrapping.htm
http://www.niklbydobermans.com/Ear%20Posting.htm
http://bakaridobes.westhost.com/postingears
http://www.dpca.org/BreedEd/ears12.htm
http://www.dpca.org/BreedEd/ears5-8.htm