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Soleil's picture
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I have a dobe she is only 1 and 3 months. She can be the sweetest most well behaved dog that I have ever owned but sometimes she "forgets' her manners.  She gets too excited and behaves horribly.  She will jump over a coffee table and onto the couch that she knows she is not allowed on.  Once she is on it she looks mortified and jumps down but I can seem to get her to stop.  Is this just something she will grow out of? or am i doing something wrong here? Please any suggestions would be a great help. 

AlphaAdmin's picture
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When does this happen? Is it when she gets happy or when she first comes in the house?

Soleil's picture
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When she gets happy .... if something really interesting is going on outside .... She LOVES to jump.  I feel bad before I can even give her a stern "off!" she is already looking sad and back on the floor unless something is REALLY going on outside then she wants to see.  She seems to know she is not allowed. 

AlphaAdmin's picture
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It sounds like she does know better but gets carried away with excitement. I imagine when people come over, or when you get home or are looking for a leash to go on a walk this might happen. Her problem is she isn't displaying her willingness to greet visitors/go walking/greet her superior pack member, in an appropriate way. Dogs naturally jump, especially puppies, because this is the natural way they greet superior members. They jump on them and lick their mouths. This is a greeting as well as a way to encourage the older member to regurgitate food.

Most of what training is, for a companion dog, is teaching the dog how to properly display such feelings and properly communicate needs and desires. She knows she's not allowed on the couch but she's not sure how to properly display enthusiasm without eventually landing there.

Personally, I train all our Dobermans that jumping-up is a BIG NO-NO. I start right away, before the Doberman is huge. It's rather simple. I never offer affection (petting) unless my dogs are sitting, all four paws on the floor, and their waggly butt planted. They learn quick. Jumping only get them ignored. Running around only gets me upset. When they get excited or when people some over, they happily trot around, planting themselves politely next to whoever in a nice little sit. Sure - they look like they're going to explode, like when I get home or prepare to take them outside, but they know the best way to display their affection and enthusiasm is to plop their little butts next to my heel and look at my face for instructions.

You can make an exercise out of it. Before she gets anything she wants, people coming in the door, going outside, food, a pat on the head, make her sit or heel. Don't let her break from it until you give the release command.

And don't worry about being mean. Scolding a dog isn't hurting them. Actually, if done properly, it's good for their mental health. In nature the Alpha tells everyone what to do all the time. It's a stressful job. The further away from being the Alpha a dog is, the more stress free they will be. When she holds her head down looking sad, all this is saying is, "I know you're in charge." Her admitting this allows her to let go of the stressful responsibility of making decisions for you. 

Soleil's picture
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Hey Horse..
I tried working with her to get her in a sitting position when she says hello instead of the crazy happy greeting I normally get.  It is sorta working.  She has learned to try to plant the butt on the ground but i must admit it is Hilarious to watch her try to wag the nub of a tail and her backside and try to sit at the same time.  But we are working on it.  So far so good i have not caught her on sofa since i last posted.  Thanks for the advice!

AlphaAdmin's picture
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You're welcome, and I know what you mean. It's like their whole body is wiggling in compensation for the missing tail. Our male is the funniest. He's just short of 100 pounds, but he rushes in to greet people, plants himself, and while wiggling stares up with this eager expression on his face.

Glad to hear you sofa's getting safer. Your girl is learning how to talk and she'll be happier for it. People are always impressed with well behaved Dobermans.

Reddobie08's picture
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my dobie starts whining when people enter so she is starting her vocal stage.....now I just have to stop her from jumping up and nipping at my 3 yr old daughter......she gets real anxious when my daughter comes around.....does anyone have any info on this?  If so PM me please......I am in dire need of help.... ???

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The entire life of a Doberman is a vocal stage.  ;)

The jumping up and "nipping" of your daughter is from your Doberman seeing her as another puppy. This is how puppies get other puppies to play with them.

If she's becoming anxious around your daughter, this is likely because your daughter is lively, or you yourself are becoming anxious. Dobermans are very perceptive and reflect their owner's attitudes (especially when they respect them).

The fist thing you need to do is teach this puppy how properly to greet and interact with your daughter. Don't pet the puppy or allow anyone to unless she is in the sit position. Ignore her and turn away if she does jump up. When she gets playful with your daughter, redirect this behavior to a toy or bone. Give her a verbal correction when she jumps up, then immediately get her playing with a toy. Use a high happy voice and poke her with the toy, put it in her mouth, and so on.

The other thing you should start doing is involving your daughter in training. The puppy should by now know and obey your sit command, now teach your daughter to tell the puppy to sit. Only allow your daughter to play with and pet the puppy while the puppy is sitting nicely.

Soleil's picture
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Redobbie08-
Another thing you might want to teach your dog is some kind of gentle command... it has become a universal word in our house.  It can mean take a treat or food very slowly and carefully out of someones hand.  Especially if you are working with training your dobie with children.  Although i don't have an kids (without 4 legs and fur) they are exposed to them quite often and i found this command to be very helpful. If you are treat training it helps so instead of a bouncing excited dobie they learn that calm and gentle behavior is rewarded.  Both my dogs amaze me with how gently they can remove a treat from my hand or a kids hand without using teeth.  It may start out a slobbery experience but they get better quick.  Good Luck

(oh i had to comment my sofa is still safe....  ;)I am amazed at how much she matured since April...)