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tmnlives's picture
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Joined: 2007-12-01

My 3-month old boy still jumps up on one of my daughters.  She has limited mobility, so the knee-up doesn't work here.  He doesn't jump on me anymore and rarely jumps on my other daughter.  He still gets excited to see other people and wants to jump on them.  I hold his leash and hold him down while telling him to stay down.  What else do I do so that he knows that it's not just me he can't jump on-it's everyone?  My husband (in Iraq) thinks he's too old for this behavior and is frustrated that it's still occurring.  How old before it should definitely be trained out?

AlphaAdmin's picture
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Joined: 2010-01-18

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The "knee-up" method really isn't a good method of training anyway, and age has little to do with it.

Dogs jump up because it's the natural greeting, licking the face and receiving a similar greeting. The dog needs to learn how to greet people appropriately.

What I've done with my dogs is teach them to sit. The only time they get a greeting or any type of affection is when they are waiting patiently for it, all paws on the floor. This includes guests, they are not allowed to pet my dogs unless they sit.

Now it's automatic. They have learned the best way to get what they want, affection, is to sit patiently with happy face.

The first step in this, of course, is only giving affection when the dog is in the sitting position. If he jumps, the person should turn away, taking away what he wants.

It is important to involve you daughter with limited mobility in training you dog. I'm not sure of you situation, but if there is a way for her to withdraw from the dog, pull herself away, similar to standing and turning from the dog, this should be used when he jumps. Perhaps a pillow could be used to shield herself.

Also, when he's jumping, she should give a sharp no, and if he has learned it, the sit command. Once he sits, then she can give him affection. A Doberman will learn this very fast.

Let us know how thing are going or if you need any more clarification. What type of training are you currently using?

tmnlives's picture
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Joined: 2007-12-01

That makes perfect sense, and it's pretty much the plan.  The biggest problem is that my daughter can't reach down to pet him, can't really carry a pillow around with her, and scleroderma is her biggest issue so she's extremely susceptible to bruising and wounding-especially on her legs which is where he reaches!  Our best bet is probably to keep her in the training loop, while keeping a good hold on the happy wild man. And I was wrong, he's almost 4 months old!  He's a pretty fast learner, but he's very happy to see her.  I also need to ask people to come over so we can practice not jumping on new people.  We meet lots of people when we're out walking, but he's not exposed to people coming to the house.

Just a bit of background:  I haven't had a dog of my own since I was a kid, never was responsible for training there; we had a 17 mo old greyhound for about 9 months.  She chewed up the house and peed in the house when she wanted something and didn't seem to get her way right away.  She continued to believe that she was the alpha female in the house. I naturally had a problem with that.  She went back to the breeder-amongst tears-and has found a happy home in New Jersey. 

Long story short, training a dog is somewhat new, but I have decent instincts, I am willing to be trained and I learn fast too.  I'm aware that Dobermans need a firm 'alpha' hand with lots of love.  I can do that!  This is my home and I love him tons.

Thanks for your time and patience!

AlphaAdmin's picture
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Have you considered a puppy class? It is obviously important that training him to use care around your daughter is important. Just remember, at his age physical correction is inappropriate. It will cause more behavioral problems and won't fix any.

At his age he should be under supervision when he is out and about. You could perhaps teach him to only approach your daughter from the side. He will be tall enough for her to reach him quite soon.

A good method could be you holding him on a leash, not allowing him to jump on her legs. She could have treats and only give them when he's sitting at her side.

I would strongly discourage allowing you daughter to hold him in her lap. Many Doberman puppies, when there's small, learn that they might be a lap-dog, and thus try to get on your lap.

richard wells's picture
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Joined: 2008-01-10

id like to say that solving the jumping up problem is a tough one ,, its fairly easy to solve if you are the alpha of the pack but to subordinates in the family its a lot harder and needs the alpha to take firm control, my idiot knows not to hurt my babies ( 5 year old boy and 15 yr old girl) but it took tough love and firmness to half solve (50% control is often a pretty good result with wilful boys)

the reson for my first post was that i had to say is there any dobie out thier that dosent think they are a lap dog??

even at 80 pounds my boy thinks hes a 10lbs cuddle puppy

25 years and on my 4th dobe and learning every day

Rich

AlphaAdmin's picture
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That's why I advocate the "only petting when you're sitting" method. We've taken this method with all three of our Dobermans and they haven't jumped on anyone in years, not even the obnoxious children that visit.