Hoytts posting system

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Grendelspop's picture
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http://www.hoytt.com/ears/  Does anyone have an opinion on this system? I have used it in the past on a show crop and still had to use tape for up to a year to get a good stance. I wonder if the system was to blame or other factors like ear length or time of crop.(9 weeks). Any other suggestions? 

AlphaAdmin's picture
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I've seen a number of such systems, perhaps not as high of quality but there's a few out there. I didn't see the cost on that page.

One good thing about it is that the surgery site is exposed to the air. This will help prevent infection. Then again, one bad thing about it is that the surgery site is exposed and not at all protected from an itchy puppy.

My first thought as soon as the page open was about the wire going across the top. That makes me cringe. It's the perfect purchase for a naughty puppy to pull it off. Also, from the second picture it looks like they're sewn or stapled to the ear. Is that correct? I don't like that idea. I always wrap and tape with the idea that it will be removed - just in case. They also talk about glue for the system. I hate using the glue. For a while we used the surgical glue, like what is used for colostomy bags. It was a mess though.

The best way we've fount for training the cropped ears of a Doberman puppy is with foam pipe insulation. There are instructions on the website for this method here http://www.gentledoberman.com/ear-cropping-4.php I like this way. It seems to be comfortable for the puppy. We don't use it until the stitches are out though. One of our vet doesn't like wrapping them at all until the stitches are our. The other one puts up his own gauze wrapping for the first week - then he removed it and the stitches - then we take over.

The pipe insulation method I've found is difficult for the puppy remove, but if he does get a grip on the material it comes off without causing damage. It's also easy to remove after seven days to change it. And - once the puppy and owner learn - it's easy and fast to change.

The other thing is that it's cheap. I can't complain about that. It's cheap and better than any other ideas we've used - although, we've never used the hoytt system.

As for your particular case: A whole hear!?!? You must not feel right anymore without ears to tend to. I bet you still buy tape when you go to the grocery store. You probably have several roles of tape in a bag in the pantry.  ;D

Seriously though, those long crops can take a long time to get just right. Even when they're standing the tips might be weak and so on. So, it's very common to keep using a little tape to touch things up.

9 weeks of age is a little young in our experience. Of our two vets, neither will crop a puppy under 10 weeks. One likes to wait until around 12 because he'd rather have a more developed ear to work with. It you remember, the difference between a 9-week-old ear and a 12-week old is quite large. The older puppy has a much bigger and longer ear. At nine week the puppy still has very puppy-ish little ears. That may have attributed to your year of fun.

Massaging the ears, after they've heeled, and calcium supplements (Tums) also seem to help the cartilage grow strong and upright.

Drayko has a medium crop. We only tapped it for about two weeks and they stood up as straight at they could.

I think this has as much to do with his attitude though. He knows he's hot stuff.

Grendelspop's picture
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Hey Horse, the wire is the coolest part of the system if they are still using the same stuff, it was that snap- back in place wire like on some eyeglass frames.The glue was just to kinda reinforce the one piece of tape inside the ear.No staples. The system is designed to help the ears stand but also give them a little movement for natural training which I like to do with clicks and funny noises. I'm thinking about using them again but they can be a little pricey if they don't stand right away. they run from 58.00 to 265.00 for the vet package.

AlphaAdmin's picture
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Aaah. They look like a good design. I was thinking of such a design a while back but eventually figured it wouldn't be practical - both for manufacturing and application reasons.

The price is a point though. You're not taking about a one shot deal with anything regarding Doberman puppies that's not bolted down and made of steel. Eventually that little beggar is going to get his fancy head gear off and take revenge on it.

If I had a puppy I needed to care for during the ear crop I'd be inclined to give these a try though - you never know how well these kinds of things work until you test them out. I image Hoytt has tested them himself so that says something good.

I say that page needs a rewrite though. It's hard to follow and says the device eliminates self injury and scaring. That's just not possible. The only thing that would do that is a 24 - 7 watch through the whole process. The worse scaring I've seen is from scratching without any wrappings at all where the puppy just keeps scratching away at the surgery site. (not with our dogs) Training is the best remedy for such behavior.

Grendelspop's picture
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Joined: 2007-12-31

P.S. Nice profile on Drayko

OldAdmin's picture
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I think if such a thing worked well, it would be a good thing. There has to be a better way than tapping those ears. The foam pipe insulation is the best of the rough ideas....

Grendelspop's picture
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Ok, my pups been in this posting system for about three weeks. Grendel is twelve weeks old now. Each time I take them down to be cleaned I let him run around for about half an hour or so to breath. After two weeks he was able to hold them up for this whole time and they looked great.When I changed them this last time I stood back to take a look at my work and for some reason they looked crooked. After changing them again and making sure everything was all straight and in-line, I stood back and again it was all crooked. After sitting in the floor and staring at him for a while I realized it wasnt the brace, but his ears. He has one ear that he is holding lower than the other. If you look straight down his nose and compare the bells on each side,the left one is down about a half inch. The ears are cut as perfect as I could have asked for, so I figure it is a lazy ear. When he goes to alert it goes to the same length, but relaxed you notice it. I took the Quick Brace off and tampon taped them for now, just so I can pull that ear up. Has anyone had this problem before? Has one ear just developed stonger, faster and the other may catch up? Any advice please. I may be starting to obsess and my wife may start having me do it somewere else  :-\

AlphaAdmin's picture
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I don't know Grendelspop, it sounds like a habit to me. At his age his ears will be acting funny anyway. He has the stress of his teething and your taping. I've seen ears come up and down over this stage so I imagine they could hold one higher than the other for a while.

The taping I've done has never bee straight. I never get the two wrapped the same. The important thing is that the cartilage is upright, that's all the taping trains. If they're straight when he stands them up, I bet they're fine.

Grendelspop's picture
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Yeah, thats kinda what I think too, I just needed to hear it from someone else. I tend to worry a little much, but you know when you spend so much time and effort on these ears you hate to see them doing anything but stand just perfect from the start. I bet your right though,I just need to be more patient I think.Thanks