Service Dog question

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bet 1941's picture
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Do we have a thread that talks about service dogs.. I thing about service dogs as like a lab or retreiver leading someone disabled.. I could qualify I just could never afford one.. but I see people with small dogs as thier service dog. and one I have seen had a great dane as their service or therapy dog and they had to let her have him in her apartment.. I always thought one as specially traind dogs..

Bet

mackerboys mom's picture
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I to would like to know,I have Coronary Microvascular Disease among other health problems, Hoss knows before I do when the chest pains are about to start what does it take to qualify him to be my service dog!    Dodie & Hoss  

Lady Kate's picture
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Good question

From what I understand, all it takes is a note from your doc saying that your dog is important to your health... ( something along those lines only more medical-ish) and they can stay at any hotel.Not 100% certain on this.. If you find more info, please let us know.. betcha there's more to it than that..

bet 1941's picture
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Well my daughter has a long hair doxie she can  talk anyplace.. she was going to take to the movie theatre. lol

Bet

DJ's Dad's picture
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From the things that I have read in different places, a service dog can be any breed, any mix, any size. You have to have a note  from your dr stating that you have a disability that can be assisted by a service dog, and then you should have your dog screened by a certified trainer to assess whether or not it qualifies as a service dog.  It has to perform at least two trained 'tasks' that help in your specific disability.  The dog can do things like pick up dropped items,alert you for an 'invisible' disablilty, such as seizures, etc., stand motionless for you to brace against (for a mobility assistance dog, for example),open doors, turn on a light switch, etc.  and has to be able to function around other people and other animals without being distracted.  It doesnt work to have a dog used as your service dog if it wants to bolt away from you when it sees another dog, or wants to rush over to an adult or child to be petted. 

I've been doing a lot of research on this subject, because my goal is to have DJ trained well enough to pass the Therapy Dog certifications (there is a test given for this by Therapy Dogs International evaluators aka TDI) and then have her also pass the tests to be a good service dog.

A good starting point is to have your dog take and pass the AKC CGC test, since it's pretty much the same thing as the therapy dog test.  Testing for therapy dogs is a little more intense, but builds on the same things that the CGC tests for.

Lots of great info on this site:

http://www.tdi-dog.org/Howtojoin.aspx?page=Testing+Requirements

DJ's Dad's picture
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*ALSO:  The misconception that any dog can be labled a 'service dog' and that all places of business MUST allow that dog to enter the facility is only true as long as that dog is well behaved and under the owner's control. 

If at any time, a service dog becomes aggitated or disruptive or aggressive, the business can request that it be removed from the premisis.  That makes sense to me.

Lady Kate's picture
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Thanks Paul.. I KNEW there had to be a lot more to it than that. I think D.J. is well on her way to becoming the Serivce Dog you've always wanted.. She's so smart and so willing to help.. The fact that she went out in the snow to bring in her little yellow ball, makes me KNOW she is compassionate as well as happy to have a purpose.

Thanks for the link.. very informative

bet 1941's picture
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Thanks again Paul for the info.. what you say makes sense.. I know it take a long time to train those dogs and about 24 thousand dollars which prob include care unitll they are old enough to train then all the training and some dont pass..I looked into it an was said I  could appliy for one but the price which was about 6000$ usually tried to be raised by fund raisers.. I didnt think I could do it and at the time didnt think i needed it..

hugs, Betty

DJ's Dad's picture
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Yes, Bet, to purchase an already trained and certified service dog that has been trained for a specific need IS very expensive.  I know a young girl in Bloomington, Indiana that is Autistic, and she has been training a dog that was previously trained partly before it became her personal dog (a white lab mix named Lucy) to be her service dog for well over a year now.  She has had the help of a very good local trainer who works with her and her dog every week, sometimes 2 - 3 days a week, and she still has some things to work out with Lucy, although in my opinion, her dog is amazing already.  It takes a lot of time, a lot of patience, and a lot of specialized training, and some dogs just never make the grade. 

I'm afraid that DJ will not be able to pass every aspect of being 100% certified, because she is SO food oriented, there's no way she could go into a restaurant and lie silently underneath a table, out of the way.  She would be begging food and doing tricks trying to earn a bite from everyone.  LOL

bet 1941's picture
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LOL does DJ also drool one of my dobies would stay away from the table across the room but sit there and drool ick

.. one thing Zoe did right away I told her OUT and she stays out of the kitchen until we are done eating and I go to the door way and call her for her treat like  a piece of meat etc. My poodles were like black sharks circling the table lol Levi still does.. I am going to work on Zoe for fun and to keep her and I from being bored.. I am disabled I think we talked about that.. 

Dont give up on DJ.. ok he isnt ready for a resturant may never be but there is a ton of things he will be able to do.. and as he matures it may come easier.. 

Zoe is over 7 and really smart..  but also loves food. Lets face it dobies are just really amazingly smart especially figuring out things.. a lot of times to keep ahead of us but I have seen amazing things they figure out from the 2 I had years ago.

Bet

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There is a young man and lady at my job who had a terrible motorcycle accident a couple years ago. She is wheelchair bound and he her boyfriend has some disabilities as well. They have a pitbull as thier service dog. I originally believed that this was a service dog given to her to help with her disabilities. She and I talked one day and amazingly she rescued this dog from a construction site she worked at previously, he was one of several puppies born there. She said some people were profiting by selling the puppies and was outraged they would do such a thing because they did not appear to be going to good homes. She decided to grab the last one before they tried to sell him. After her accident she sent him to a trainer to become her service dog. He is the sweetest most well behaved dog. But...he does walk the office looking for treats! Every once in a while I get a good laugh because he will come from the opposite side of a coworkers desk when she is eating his head touching her legs and she freaks out every single time! He is still a work in progress she says but he is doing very well. She rescued him and he has is now her rescuer.

Cyndy

bet 1941's picture
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Thanks for sharing.. Cyndy.. great story.. pits are great people dogs. they used to be called nanny dogs I think people got them to guard babies that are put in the yard for fresh air. whats not fair is people are breeding them indiscremtly and mixing them etc.. they want them to be mean etc plus some breed them for fighting.. so they are exploited..

Bet

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BET miniature horses are classified as being service animals which I thought was hysterical but very smart as they are strong enough to allow people to pull up on them without fear of breaking their back like a dog; and any service dog has to wear the approved vest showing they are certified service dog that is what allows them to enter public places; and the dog does as Paul said - have to be under the owner's control at all times. Any dog and apparently mini horses can become a service dog/animal with proper training and certification. My mother in law had a neighbor who just wanted to be able to take a dog wherever he went so he got a service dog drop out and got him a red vest and demanded that the dog be allowed to go places and was refused, he also had my mother in law convinced the dog WAS a service dog but the description of the dog never being seen in a vest stating service dog, or staying with the wife at any time who was supposed to be the disabled person the dog was for, indicated to me that the dog was a pet and not focused on his charge - the wife. So alot of people abuse the ability to have a service dog; I wanted a doberman to be my service dog that's how I ended up in this forum I am still considering a service dog at some point not sure it will be a dobie, it might be a collie since I know I can train a collie easy, I might choose a rottie as they are so eager to please and large enough to not have to bend over to far; great danes from my experience are big clowns and not as focused as other breeds, making training for service jobs difficult in my opinion, no offense to great dane lovers, but they are big clowns I have never seen one that wanted to have a job.....obviously border collies and aussie's excel at this job, but so do other breeds - some because they can smell seizure activity in a human before it happens, others for their ability to retrieve items and turn things on/off etc. depends on the dog and the job you need them to do; if you have multiple jobs for the dog then you need a multi tasking dog like a border collie; I just read where a greyhound was adopted and certified a service dog for a child because the dog bonded and could tell when the child was having a seizure.....the greyhound was 7 years old when adopted so he learned instinctually and that has been a blessing to the family, so you just never know....

bet 1941's picture
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Yes I think it is abused a lot.. I know some people need the dog for emotional reasons to and I dont know that is a catagorie.. If I went a lot of places I would try to get one and do fundraisers to raise the money like they tell you.. I think they help you with that and at the end you have a great dog that is usualy lab/golden retreiver or mix.. now if they could train one to cook that would be nice lol

I got Zoe for peace of mind when Mike is away.. she has a hardy bark that she only uses when she really hears or sees something different.. unlike Levi who barks when anyone come.. that is ok better than not.. So there is a doberman a poodle and a shot gun lol.. we live way out in the country and very rarely have any problems.  My inlaws live down the road too so that is a good thing.

I am going to try to train Zoe for some things maybe just games but who knows where that will lead.. she follows my chair around and I talk to her and if she is like my other dobies she will know my next step..

Bet

talisin's picture
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I bet BET hahaha, that she learns what you need her to!! wondered how you were doing hadn't heard from you in a while; games are an excellent way to teach so you guys have fun!!!

bet 1941's picture
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Well we are working on the shell game.  I think she is catching on.. 'she is a silly girl. she stands in the other room right opposite me waiting for me to notice.. she wants to go out.. she will whine if I dont notice.. she does that when she is hungry and also after 9 pm to go in my bedroom to bed..

hugs, Bet