Goats yelling

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gingersmommy's picture
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Some of you may have already seen this, but I thought it was so funny!!!  I love animals!  The one screaming is my husband, John.    (just joshing)

http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=Agb1DTUlKuBBazyIZHSJVJSbvZx4?fr=yfp-t-701-s&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8&p=goats%20yelling%20like%20humans

Lady Kate's picture
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Oh my gosh.. I hope Lilian sees this.. Hey Lil.. are those your goats??

Thanks M. for posting!! These are wonderful.. I love goats!!!

gingersmommy's picture
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I think I would freak out if I had goats, heard that and didn't know that that was normal.

Is Lilian Harleybear's mom?

I wonder if these goats are a certain kind (?).

gingersmommy's picture
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Oops, hopefully, this will provide a direct link:  Just click on the picture.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/02/15/two-minutes-of-goats-yelling-like-humans/

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I saw this and laughed till I cried it would freak me out too, that one that spit was the freakest yell really weird.....but way too funny and you could tell these were not the same goats or the same areas so it must be pretty common.....

HarleyBear's picture
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I just found this thread, oh my goodness.  Only like a month later, right?  

Yup, that's what they sound like.  Pretty terrible isn't it?  When I first brought my doelings home they screamed and screamed and screamed.  I thought my neighbors were going to kill me.  I explained to them they were only screaming because they miss their momma and they want their milk.  I bottle-fed them for like a month after that.  Once we weaned them, they have significantly lessened the screaming, thank goodness. 

BUT, I have heard that my breed of goat are especially vocal.  Greaaat....

The nickering is actually a nice sound, it's the screaming that drove me crazy.  

talisin's picture
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hahahaahah I wondered if you had seen this thread, I thought of you immediately when you mentioned the goat ramble......these were hysterical

gingersmommy's picture
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I never knew they screamed until I saw this.  Pretty funny.  Actually, I thought they were quiet animals. 

Harley, are your goats neutered, or are you going to breed them?  At what age do they mature?

HarleyBear's picture
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They are not neutered.  My goats are dairy goats so they will be breed with the sole intent of producing milk. I will do my best to sell the kids, but unfortunately if you eat any dairy product, such as cheese, milk, or yogurt, you have to have babies.  They can have any where from 1-3 kids.

I plan to breed them in the fall when they are about a year and half.  Goats are sexually mature as young as 7 weeks.  But that does not mean they should be breed then.  I want to wait for them to be big and strong enough to handle pregnancy and labor, so for them that means a year and half.

I have quite a few steps I need to do before breeding them.  I need to get them tested for CAE/CL/Jones diseases.  Which means I need to learn to draw blood, ugh!.  Then I need to find a stud, which is easier said than done.  A lot of people are starting to use Artificial Insemination, but that requires very expensive equipment that I don't have.  So, we'll have to do it the ol' fashion way.

Then, if they take, the count-down begins!  But it's not all fun and games.  I need to have the kids de-horned within the first week (not a pleasant experience for anyone) and then any males will need to be banded (using a rubber-band to neuter).  I have 7-months to sell any of my males.  I suspect females will be easier. 

So I have a lot of work ahead of me.  But the whole reason for all of this is to eat local, healthy, and organic food.  And what is more local than from my own backyard?  We are just starting our organic garden, milking goats, setting up the chicken coop, and bees.  It was kind of a long answer for your question, but I wanted to convey that I love my little life, but it is a lot of work!

talisin's picture
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Not be a downer on this subject cause I love the goats, but I do worry about what will happen to the babies that you will be creating in order to have the milk. :((  I belong to alot of animal advocacy groups and the horrible things that happen to baby livestock is just heartbreaking......it's like any bully breed puppies that are thrown into dog fights etc. these babies will be removed from their mom and sent away to what??? It's also a lot of work as you know......one of the reasons I have begun to eat totally vegan - I just can't just be vegetarian anymore knowing about the babies that result out of the dairy industry......

Good luck with the direction you choose and do post pics of all the goats so we can oooo and ahhh cause there is nothing like the cute face of baby anything, and if you have goats that scream be sure to video those too......

gingersmommy's picture
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Lil, fascinating stuff. I just love farm animals and wish I had more exposure to them. If you breed in the fall, what is the gestation period?  I'm assuming not that long and they will be born in the winter.  Oh, duh, just remembered you are in Cal., so your winters are more temperate.  Do they overnight in the barn, or are they out to pasture at night?  Do you have to milk they every day?  They are the cutest things!

HarleyBear's picture
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Talisan, I totally understand where you are coming from.  In fact, that is one of the main reasons I am sourcing my food from my backyard.  Unless I KNOW that the animals I am eating (or eating their eggs, milk, etc) are treated well, I eat vegan as well.  We are part of a meat CSA where I know and speak to the farmer directly when he drops off the meat.  He takes good care of his animals and loves them dearly.  He is not organic, because he believes in treating his cattle if they get sick.  To be certified organic you can't use any antibiotics, so many farmers just let their animals die.

Growing my own food allows me to make sure that all my animals are treated with love and respect, even on their last day.  I've seen the videos of what they do to baby livestock from the mass commercial farms and it makes me sick.  They are not seen as living breathing creatures, but as products and it is just terrible.  They butcher hundred of cows in a day and thousands of chickens.  That doesn't allow any time and thought into what these animals have done for us.  ALSO it makes it super easy to pass dangerous bacteria.  That's why we have such scary mass food recalls.  

My little farm is modeled after Joel Salistan at Polyface, but on a much smaller scale.  All animals are treated with respect because of what they provide for us.  Females fair better, so I suspect that my girls will be sold to other family milkers.  My males, most likely, will stay with me until the 7 month mark.  During that time, he will live outside in the sunshine with his mother and will be well taken care of.  Everything will be done with love, respect, prayers, and gratitude.

The average gestation is about 150 days.  So kids will be born late winter or early spring.  Right now the temperature outside is about 70 degrees.  So it is pretty warm, but I suspect I will have to put doggy sweaters on my kids just be sure.  I have a 3-stall horse barn that I close my goats in at night.  There are coyotes near-by and I want to make sure they stay safe.  I have been toying with the idea of a livestock guarding llama.  I will probably rescue one, I see them on petfinder all the time.  A lot of people use Livestock Guarding Dogs (LGD), but I can't imagine having a dog that is not part of the family.  LGD bond more closely to their herd and live outside with them.  

They do have to be milked everyday.  But I like the idea of my Momma goats bonding their kids.  So I will not milk them dry and will milk them only once a day everyday (the usual practice, is to remove the kids immediately after birth and milk the goat twice a day).  

Having goats is definitely not for everyone.  I never take vacation, because someone has to be home to let them in and out of the barn.  Also once they start milking, they need to be milked at the exact same time everyday.  It doesn't leave a lot room for a flexible schedule.  

I am really excited, because we just finished our plans for the chicken coop.  I hope to get around 3 hens, maybe some easter layers.  Blue eggs anyone?

gingersmommy's picture
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So interesting.  I first heard of guardian llamas at our State Fair.  They had a lot of information on it and I never knew that they were so good at keeping predators away.  They seem so docile and relatively awkward, but I guess they are no joke. Sounds like you are totally vested in being a caretaker of your animals and that you have researched extensively.  I love to hear of your plans.  How about a bat house?  (If I can't have them, I figure maybe you'll add it to your list of critters.) 

HarleyBear's picture
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Yes, bats! You mentioned that and I meant to look into that further.  What are the benefits of bats?  I've been looking into biological fly control (fly eaters) that will require me to release them every 2-4 weeks during the summer.  Would bats help with pests?  

Would it be easy to install a house?  Would they find the house?  A bat house sounds must cheaper than buying flyeaters.

gingersmommy's picture
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Harley, I just love bats; I think they are so beautiful.  What could be more wonderous than a flying mammal!  Anyway, bats are great at pest control (mosquitoes, etc.). Bat houses are so cool, too - very flat box with skinny opening.  The bats roost in the box and they like to be crowded for warmth.  Many of them can fit/live in a relatively small box.  There has to be a permanent water source nearby.  The box should be painted black for warmth (not sure about Cal.), be placed a certain distance from the ground and face a certain direction (away from the wind).  You can build a bat house on your own (in your spare time!  )- I don't think it is that complex a structure.  Here is a little more info.

http://batmanagement.com/Batcentral/batboxes/whyfail.html

talisin's picture
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Love Bats!!! can't wait to see pics of goats!!!!

HarleyBear's picture
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Gingersmommy:  Have you had success with your bat house?  I read through that site and it makes it sound that bats are very specific on what they need.  Did you build yours or did you buy it?

I think bats are cute and anything to help me with flies and yellowjackets.  I wonder how bats and honeybees get along?

gingersmommy's picture
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Harley, we don't have a bat house because we live in an "urban suburbia" and I've never seen them here.  Our friends live in the country and they have lots of them as soon as it gets dusk.  My girlfriend thinks I'm crazy when I mention bat houses, goats and chickens (and they already have a chicken coop on the property from the previous owners!).  So, sorry, I have no firsthand experience.  (I will stop suggesting critters you should  get!)

I think the only bugs that are in danger from bats are the ones that are out at night, so bees (and unfortunately hornets) should be okay.