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ShibaDobie's picture
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After meeting our new pup this past weekend (bringing her home after thanksgiving), and even after reading a zillion articles....im nervous

   She had a vestibular disorder when she was young, which left her with a on and off head tilt, and just a little wobble. She has been passed around her whole life (she is 12 weeks), and when we went to see her it took a half hour before she would even let me touch her, and even then, she was very skiddish. Her foster mom says she has been trying to work with her, but that she doesnt like her face or ears touched...unless she is too tired to put up a fight.

   It's not a deal breaker (I already love her to bits), its just...all the dogs I have ever had have been the opposite. Its always a battle of wills...not a battle with fear. I'm so nervous that I am going to make a wrong move and scar/scare her for life. I am hoping that Dexter will give her a little confidence in us, but I just dont know. I have puppy classes already scheduled...but all I can think of is that she will be too terrified to go. I know its probably just my "new Dobe mom" fears running away with me, but she has had such a hard life already, I just want to be the best home for her and help her learn how to enjoy life.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated

Freyja's Dad's picture
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Congrats on getting your new puppy.

My first thought is to make sure that you treat her as you would any other puppy that you would bring home.  Don't make her "special" but work toward making her a regular member of the pack.  She will figure out where she belongs in your pack.  Getting her into training is a great start, as it will get the learning process started for her.

Of course you'll want to pet and love her.  If she won't let you pet her on the head then pet her on the back, the leg, wherever she feels comfortable with you touching her.  Don't push her, let her get desensitized to petting, and she'll probably come around.  It'll just take time and patience.

Lady Kate's picture
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I think you will be a great mom.. You already are with your gorgeous Dexter.. As Freyja'sDad said time and patience.. Dobermans have an uncanny way of sensing our moods ( even more so than any other dog I've ever known) Your new baby will be a little confused at first, but with the love and dedication you've already shown, I think all will be fine before you know it..

I've been told ( by someone on this forum,,, I think it was rgreen) that it takes six months or so for rescued dogs to feel settled.. I know that was true for us and Sofia.

So take a deep breath and get ready for a wonderful experience and lots and lots of fun.

Have you thought of a name yet>?

glengate's picture
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Joined: 2009-07-22

These puppies are often referred to as "dings".  Do they know if she is unilaterally or bilaterally deaf?  She might be, and maybe petting her head startles her in some way? 

I agree with the advice to treat her like any other puppy for the most part.  Don't waste time feeling sorry for her.  Don't set up an environment of pity.  Just get on with a good life.  Although you may have to change expectations for her to some extent, have expectations.   

BTW, older dogs can have a similar vestibular problem.  One of mine went through it, and one thing I definitely noticed about him was that he was no longer comfortable with his feet off the ground.  We were doing open obedience at the time, and I had to retire him because of the jumping. 

Oh, also, there is a researcher that is currently looking for DNA samples from ding puppies.  You might want to consider providing him with some material?  I'll post the info later. 

ShibaDobie's picture
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Thanks guys for your help...I guess I just need to take a breath and be patient, just take it one step at a time and encourage her to achieve as much as she can ^.^

 

Sorry LadyKate, we havent nailed down a name yet. Her current name is Matilda (which I like) but my fiance isnt so fond of it. I made a list today of a few that I like alot, so this weekend is crunch time to nail one down.


The woman who found her at a vet clinic and turned her over to IDR, took her to UW and had her tested for any underlying condition that might have caused the vestibular disorder in the first place, as well as deafness, cancer, and other things, and they all came up clean and okay. Is the researcher looking for ways to prevent this condition, or how to make dogs with this conditions' lives more symptom free? I look forward to reading the info on the study ^.^

jeshykai's picture
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I have done rescue work for well... 10 or so years... maybe even more.  Each dog is different, each house is different, each bond is different.  This foster mom just might not be the right person for the puppy to feel comfortable with.  Also, how many other animals are in the foster situation?  One thing I've noticed is that foster parents tend to take on too many and that in itself can be stressful.  Being passed around at a young age can be traumatic, but I think it's harder on the older dogs.  Once she's home and settled you will figure out what will work for you.  I agree that training, with a trainer if you aren't experienced, is probably going to save you huge headaches in the future.

I had one rescue dog that came to me after being abandoned in a house for a week, shuttled from home to home (he went through 3 before I got the phone call) and when I brought him home he had this horrendous cough/gag.  I did bloodwork, xrays, everything.  We couldn't figure out was wrong.  Then I was watching him one day.. and he kept trying to drink water.. but, I am not kidding, he was SCARED of the water.  Scared enough that he'd take a drink and leap back.  I had to couch him to drink water for 3 weeks before he finally got over the phobia.

The head petting thing will come in time... she will always have quirks... you will learn them and adjust.  It's part of rescuing.  The last rescue I had was a queensland/shepherd mix who was hit by a car when he was 12 weeks old and spent his entire life in the vet in a kennel or the pound until I got him at a year and a half.  He was fat, miserable, and hated to walk because it still bothered his bad leg.  It took me a good 5 months to get the weight off of him and to give him confidence to walk again.  Now he lives on a ranch with other dogs and chases cows and horses all day... you'd never know the mess he was when I got him.

ANYway.. sorry for the ramble.  But I just wanted to show you that rescues will have problems but when they settle with you and bond with you many of them will go away.  You'll find what she likes (will it be petting? food? quiet time? a special blanket?) and it will allow you to bond.  It'll work out.  :)

ShibaDobie's picture
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No, Jeshykai, you werent rambling. It helps to know that other rescues have bounced back from similar, if not worse things with the right amout of patience and love. ^.^

glengate's picture
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Is the researcher looking for ways to prevent this condition, or how to make dogs with this conditions' lives more symptom free?

I *think* the research is more along the lines of looking for a marker in order to create a DNA test so that dogs with this condition are no longer produced.  I still have to go grab it from another window and post it here.  I haven't forgotten, it's just that I have to open another program. 

glengate's picture
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This repost doesn't mention the ding puppies.  However, I think it's the same researchers.  Now I have to go find the one that mentions the dings.

 

Samples from Dobermans diagnosed with cancer, cardiomyopathy and/or wobblers
are needed NOW for a new, well-funded research program pursuing genetic markers for these diseases. There is NO COST to owners for submitting samples and ALL SAMPLES WILL REMAIN COMPLETELY ANONYMOUS.

The past year has witnessed remarkable advances in canine genetics including the launch of new molecular tools for elucidating the complete genetic code of an individual dog. Scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), in collaboration with those at the Van Andel Research Institute (VARI), are employing these advances to accelerate research into the basis of devastating diseases affecting both canines and humans.

There is presently seven figure funding, technological infrastructure and collective expertise to enable the rapid completion of canine genetic research projects in a matter of months as opposed to years. TGen/VARI have requested samples to pursue study of Doberman breed associated 1) cancer, 2) cardiomyopathy and 3) wobblers. IF sufficient numbers of DNA samples from affected Dobermans are received, initial results of research may be reported as early as at this year's National.

***You will be mailed a saliva collection kit free of charge to whatever address you indicate. The kit will include a postage pre-paid envelope for you to return the sample in. The saliva collection process takes less than 3 minutes, is painless, and can be done in the privacy of your own home- no vet visit/trip required.***

For EACH of these 3 conditions a minimum of 40 samples are needed- that is 40 Dobermans diagnosed with each disease. If the Institutes receive 40 or more samples from Dobermans with each condition, they will use them to pursue scientific evaluation of the underlying biology and genetic bases of these diseases. **At this time in our established Doberman DNA blood bank, there are only 2 dogs reporting wobblers and 7 reporting DCM. THUS, THIS OPPORTUNE, WELL-FUNDED RESEARCH CAN ONLY BE UNDERTAKEN IF MANY MORE SAMPLES FROM DOGS DIAGNOSED WITH EACH DISEASE ARE SUBMITTED.**

For each of the following types of cancer, 10 affected Dobermans each are needed to submit samples: lymphoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, melanoma and malignant histiocystosis.

This is an unprecedented opportunity for the Doberman Pinscher community to step up and help researchers address major health problems in our breed. Dr. Mark Neff (TGen/VARI) was on schedule to speak this October at the National. He indicates he would be particularly enthused if he could present some successful findings on one or more breed associated diseases at that time.

We all KNOW there are more than 40 Dobermans afflicted with each of these diseases out there. The greater the number of specimens received, the greater the accuracy of research findings.

Please let's avail ourselves of these cutting edge research programs toward
improving the health of our breed- the funds will not be there forever!  PLEASE, take a few minutes to participate *For the Love of Dobermans*!!

For saliva submission kits (+/- info on submitting blood), please contact with the number of kits you need, your mailing address and phone:
DNA Collections c/o Elissa Boguslawski
elissa.boguslawski@vai.org

616-234-5561

1. Blood samples are also very desirable from dogs diagnosed with any of the above conditions (desirable but not required). If you are willing to take the extra step of providing a blood sample from your dog, the Institutes will reimburse your veterinarian $10 for the blood draw procedure AND provide you with a FedEx account number to completely cover the cost of shipping the sample in. Simply indicate when you contact Elissa that you need the info on how to submit a blood sample.

2. Dogs diagnosed with more than one of these diseases ARE eligible to participate; owners should simply note this on the submission form. Also, if your dog has other health issues besides these three conditions they too can participate.

IN SUM:

***NO COST
***COMPLETELY CONFIDENTIAL (switched over into code upon receipt at lab)
***SPECIMENS FROM DOBERMANS DIAGNOSED WITH CANCER, DCM
(clinical/symptomatic OR occult), WOBBLERS NEEDED NOW!

glengate's picture
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Joined: 2009-07-22

Here is another later post about the same researchers.

 

As reported a month or so ago, Dr. Mark Neff and his research team began active DNA investigation using the saliva/blood samples submitted to that point of Dobermans affected with Dobe liver disease, wobblers or dings.

Promising leads have already developed for liver disease and dings! In order to close in further on a causal mutation(s) for each of these conditions, Dr. Neff's team urgently needs more samples NOW:

**1. additional saliva or blood samples from dogs diagnosed with Doberman liver disease. Remember it is not required that a dog have had a liver biopsy- nice but Not necessary. Diagnosis by a veterinarian based on symptoms, exam and bloodwork is acceptable.

**2. additional saliva or blood samples from dogs diagnosed with dings or MORE IMPORTANTLY AT THIS TIME from sires and dams known to have produced one or more puppies diagnosed with dings. We did not actively pursue samples from such sires and dams earlier, but it is now very important that samples be submitted SOON on such dogs.

Remember submissions are and will remain strictly confidential and all expenses are covered, there is no cost to you.

Before the holidays are upon us, PLEASE request your saliva submission kit(s) or instructions on submitting blood samples. You can still email Elissa at    Elissa.Boguslawski@...  (not clickable)

or for instant ordering of supplies on line you can now go to TGen's new website:

                           www.tgen.org/doberman

Let's get as many additional liver and dings samples into Dr. Neff's hands BEFORE the end of November as possible- THANK YOU!!!
Contact me with any questions,
 

ShibaDobie's picture
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I watched some videos and read a few articles on ding puppies (broke my heart). Matilda's condition doesnt seem near as severe, and she doesnt have any hearing loss whatsoever. When I go get her next weekend and take her to my vet (who is a dobermommy) I will ask her about it and see if she would qualify for something like this. Although seeing her and then watching the vidoes featuring actual ding puppies, and how severe thier disorientation is, its hard to believe that she is a ding. But if she qualifies, i will deffinitely send some samples in for study. thanks so much for the info ^.^