Puppy Chronicles: Pecans!

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MommaL's picture
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Our pecan trees are starting to drop their bounty.  For the last 12 seasons, I had my trusty Golden to keep me company and be the unofficial taste tester.  I can happily report that Rip and Lola have decided they are up to the task...

They have given the "taste-test" paws up, but it may take the rest of the season to teach them to crack the shells and work the fruit for themselves....silly pups.

talisin's picture
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Pecans

Pecans also contain the toxin juglone that can cause laminitis in horses. Feeding dogs pecans can cause gastric intestinal upset or an obstruction.

Like walnuts, moldy pecans can contain tremorgenic mycotoxins which can cause seizures or neurological symptoms.

http://www.petinsurance.com/healthzone/pet-articles/pet-health-toxins/Nu...

Tree nuts, such as walnuts, pecans, pistachios, and Brazil nuts - are often contaminated with very low levels of the poison Aflatoxin, which comes from the Aspergillus mold. Although levels are safe for humans, dogs are acutely sensitive to this poison, and even low levels of Aflatoxin can be extremely toxic and lead to complications such as gastroenteritis.

Other varieties of nuts such as walnuts can cause various other dog illnesses and dog poisoning. Nuts also have a high phosphorus content which causes the formation of bladder stones in dogs.

Peanut butter (non-salted) appears to be non-toxic to dogs, although peanuts themselves may have ill-effects on your dog.

Symptoms of Aflatoxin poisoning include: loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting, orange-colored urine and jaundice, liver failure, blood-tinged vomit and bloody or blackened stools.

Possible Outcomes: Aflatoxin causes severe hepatocellular necrosis (acute liver failure) within 72 hours.

Symptoms of gastroenteritis include: persistent vomiting (sometimes bile may be seen in the vomit), dehydration and watery diarrhea. Lethargy, lack of appetite, stomach grumbling, and general listlessness.

Symptoms of bladder stones include: difficulty urinating, frequent "dribbling" urination, bloody urine, painful urination. This results in blockage of urinary tract due to bladder stones.

These episodes can be either acute (short lived), or last for several days.

Action: Take your dog to the vet for immediate treatment.

Read more at http://www.dogheirs.com/dogheirs/posts/141-toxic-foods-for-dogs-fruits-v...

Pecans in the Shell

If you pooch gets a hold of pecans still in the shell, it can pose a choking hazard or an intestinal blockage. If your dog is choking, time is of the essence -- have someone call your vet or emergency veterinarian clinic while you work with the dog. ASPCA recommends you put your fingers in his mouth to see if you can remove the shell. If you can’t get it out, you’ll have to give a modified Heimlich maneuver on your dog. They recommend you give a sharp rap to the dog’s chest to dislodge the object. If that doesn’t work and he becomes unconscious, you may even have to perform doggie CPR. Just like with humans, dogs need air to survive. If he is choking and the blockage is not removed, it could kill him.
In the case of an intestinal blockage, your pooch may start to act a bit off, such as vomiting, lethargy or appetite loss. If you notice anything unusual, contact your vet or emergency veterinarian clinic for advice.

Can Pecans Kill a Dog?

If your dog eats one pecan nut, it's not going to kill him. As long as he doesn’t eat the whole shell or an entire bag of nuts, and as long as they’re not salted or moldy, he should be all right. However, it can be dangerous, cause health issues and possibly be fatal if your dog eats large quantities of pecans

 

I thought I had read that pecans were toxic so I did a bit of snooping and found the info above thought I would share it just in case.

You probably know all about this but for those who don't thought it might be good info

 

MommaL's picture
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As usual, the information is excellent.  Thank you Tali.  We will be very careful.  They were interested in the "new" game of mom on her hands and knees in the grass ... up until the tempature dropped.  Now, not so much.  And that suits me just fine because "Capt. Lean-a-lot" kept knocking me over! 

talisin's picture
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hahaha - I remember when we took Ben to the beach after he was diagnosed with cancer we wanted him to have the ocean experience before he died - he was watching me pick up shells and hand them to danny and after a few looks he began to nudge the shells with his nose and look at me and I would pick them up and say WOW look at that one, then he realized I wanted the larger ones and he was a happy boy picking out shells for mom, he got to where he would pick them up and hand them to me.....

Rotties are very quick learners too, I do so miss him........so I can appreciate their zest for the new thing mommy likes :)) just wanted you to know in case one swallowed one by accident and got sick you would know to tell the vet they might have swallowed a pecan...

Benjaman was horrible for picking things up off the ground and eating them, ended up in the hospital 3 times due to it, so it's always good to know where to look first when that happens.....

It's FREEZING here don't know about there but burrrrrrr

MommaL's picture
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It's plenty cold here now for me. I live in central Texas for a reason.