Sable Keeps biting the necks while playing. Help???

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puppysable's picture
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Joined: 2012-05-19

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Sable (6 months old- 55 pounds) :   While playing with dogs, she'll bite the collar and try to flip them over on their backs, she will even sometimes try to drag them by their necks. I HATE THIS HABIT!  The dogs don't seem to mind, but when she becomes 100+ pounds I'm sure that will change. I interfer when she starts doing that, saying no, and bad. I'll even put her in time out.  It doesn't seem to work tho. Any ideas?

Thank you
 

Rocket mom's picture
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Joined: 2012-09-01

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My minpin, Trinket, does the same thing with any dog she can reach, she is an alpha dog. I believe it is her way of saying 'OK you can join my pack but I am the uncontested leader, got it.' She is the boss of my dobie and though she can't reach his neck or flip him if she could, she bites his lip to keep him in line. When my grown children bring their dogs to visit she will get up on the couch and put her arm or her neck across their shoulders. This has been her way of handling any of the family dogs, including a huge rottie and a german shepard. She doesn't hurt the smaller dogs but she will hold them by the neck on their backs until they surrender. I may have it all wrong but I think an alpha dog will find a way to show other dogs they don't plan to step down, ever. Once she has established her dominance she plays and acts like the rest of the dogs. Of course my alpha dog is only nine pounds, I can see why you are a little more concerned over Sable. None of our dogs have ever challenged my minpin, they simply allow her to be in charge.

Kim
Kim's picture
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Joined: 2012-02-05

While I "get" the dominant thing, I wouldn't let it go too far. Squirt bottle.  :-)

Also - be sure to keep an eye on her when she does that - I made the mistake (an awful one) of leaving the collars on two of mine when they were playing out in the yard. Libby grabbed Dillon by the collar, and somehow he got flipped over. The collar twisted around Lib's jaw, she couldn't get loose, and Dillon very nearly strangled. I heard them shreiking, ran out, flipped Dillon back over (72 pounds of dog), and got them untangled.

I never let them play in the yard again with collars on.

DJ's Dad's picture
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Definitely a dominance thing during play, which COULD turn ugly if the dog being grabbed by the neck decides to turn it into a fight instead of play time.  I'd be using a squirt bottle like Kim suggested and try to downplay that action.  You dont want to 'punish' the dog for doing what it does naturally, but you can tone it down and let Sable know that it's not acceptable play.

KevinK's picture
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This could become extremely dangerous, luckily this has been done to more submissive dogs.  Doing that to a dominant dog will probably result in a fight.  I would keep in mind that dobermans tend to be same sex aggressive, but she's a bit young for that to start really showing too much.  Dobes tend to play rougher than other dogs, my girl who is small (20" at withers) plays best with dogs that are a good bit bigger than her.  Do you know these other dogs?  Where is this happening?

puppysable's picture
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Joined: 2012-05-19

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Thanks everyone!
The squirt bottle is a good idea, I shall use that.

 

Well she does this with several dogs. But there is one that she always does it with. Its another female and its my friends dog.

Jake's picture
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Joined: 2012-08-29

I tried the water bottle last night, it works amazing!