Is the Doberman right for me???

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Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

Ok so I have been doing my research, and asking my self time and time again, would a doberman really be happy in my home and if so when would be a good time for me to get a puppy. So to help me and my family make the right decision I am going to ask my forum friends their opion. I will try my best to give you just the facts and please feel free to ask me further questions if you feel that I have left out an important aspect I didnt think about.  PLEASE HELP!!!! It as always been my dream to own a doberman and now I feel as if I may be able to accomplish that dream.

Ok the facts about The White Family: I, "mama" am a stay at home mom of two children my daughter who is 3yrs old and my son who will be 7 months on the 29th. I am a firm believer that kids should be raised in thier home and not hauled around town allday long running errands here and there. The only time that I leave the house on a regular bases is to take my Daughter to preschool on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. Then everyday at around 2-3 oclock I head to our farm to feed our three mama cows and one pig. Our farm is about 11 acres. My husband is a Railroader so he does not have a schedule and is gone for two or more days at a time and comes and goes at all hours day or night. We currently own two Minature Schnauzers a 6 yr old spayed female who is 100% my husbands dog, and a 10yr old intaked Male who loves anyone who is willing to give him attention.  I do have a large mixed breed male who is still living at my moms house where he has been since we got him as a pup. We tried to move him with me when my husband and I moved into our house a yr ago but he was not his happy self, so he is now at my moms happy as he can be with "his" horses.  My hobby is showing my horse, granted now that I have my kiddos i dont get to ride as much as I use to but when I can I go to my moms to ride. 

Now the biggest question I have is the age of my children. Is any age ok with a doberman or which age is best. My daughter is excellent with our two dogs now and my son shows to be very tolerant of their playful rants thru the house, even when they colide and fall on top of him or knock him over now that he is trying to crawl and follow them.

I have done obidence classes in the past with my other dogs so training I dont beleive will be an issue with a pup, along with the excersie aspect because of my daily tripps to the farm and our large back yard (granted being a country girl I would prefer larger) lol

I apologize for the length, but any advice would be great. Thank you to all!!!

Amanda, Tyler, Lexee and Marcus.

Wolfgirl_121's picture
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Joined: 2010-11-08

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The only issue I see is your other dogs. Dobes tend to be pretty same sex agressive, and as you have one of each, you will really have to work with them for them to tolerate eachother. And if agression does become an issue, are you willing to take the time and effort to separate them 100% of the time?

Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

thank you for your advice. both of our dogs travel to family members homes with other dogs simply becuase they go everywhere with us when possible. So I believe the only one Id have to work with on that is would be the new pup, granted each situation is different as well as each dog. If it comes down to sepperating them, yes becuase when I give a dog a home its a forever home and that means what ever it take to make everyone happy.

Again thankyou for your thoughts.

Amanda

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

I have read and read and read some more about this same sex aggression in the doberman and I have come to the conclusion that I will probably pass on my doberman because I just don't want to have to deal with any altercation, dogs fighting scares the pea snot out of me. I have read here on the forum about dogs getting along great until around 2 years old at which point sometimes the dog just one day looks at his/her best doggie friend and attacks; that would scare me to death. So I am going to adopt a collie instead, everyone here knows that I am a collie person so that's not a stretch for me; but having a rottweiler is enough work I think I will just go the easier route and stay with collies.

I hope it works out for you, but as soon as I read your post I knew that regardless of how friendly your male schnauzer is it would be a problem if you chose a male doberman and reading that the dog is also intact - that would just make it worse I would think. Whether you choose a female doberman or a male do be prepared to keep them separated as your puppy reaches the 1 1/2 year to 2 year mark.

I am sure you will get alot of great advice here on the forum.

Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

i was leaning towards a female simply because of our male and yes she WILL be spayed!!!!!!!

thankyou for your advice.

Hickory67's picture
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Joined: 2011-07-20

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Agree you should be mindful of the same-sex aggression issue. I was ignorant of that fact when I got Gideon, and we have a male chihuahua in the house, so we're having to be vigilant. Gideon is not aggressive at this point, but he is very jealous of my attention and tries to "nose bump" Stormy out of my lap.

*Sidebar: Talisin, let me know if you need help finding a collie :-) *

Joined: 2011-02-21

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very interesting because we have a 1-yr old Dobe male, Maximus and a 3-yr old (neutered) Chihuahua/Dachshund mix. I was thinking that them "growing up together" should mean that they get along as a pack. And so far, they are fine. They play-fight everyday harmlessly (I think) and in the end, Boris (the littl'un) tends to get edgy and end it by biting maximus' ear. Then Mxms just kinda moans and walks off and maybe goes and lies in Boris' bed.

So I was thinking my little (70 pounds) Maximus is so passive (often ignores other male dogs or just wants to play while they are growling away, then just kind of runs away) that he'll be just fine with Boris.

Now I read this! And I'm really worried that our little (12 pounds) Boris will be eaten one day when they are at home alone (usually only a few times a week for an hour or so).

 

Should I really start separating them soon? Or is it quite rare that after living together fine for over a year, that Maximus would just snap and attack Boris (with serious intention to harm)?

poogie's picture
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I recently got my first doberman and he is now 5 months and we have had a very big problem with play biting and a comment we had from many visitors was "thank god you don't have young children around you wouldn't have been able to keep him". I understand it is only a pup thing and he is now 100 times better but the needle sharp teeth of a large puppy you do not want sinking into a small child. Every doberman doesn't do this and I am sure you would find other breeds that do it however since I have had the problem and spoken to alot of people (vet, breeder, trainers and people on the forum) it would seem it is something alot of dobermans do. However since you have dogs already it might not be such a problem as they may put the pup in his place. We don't have other dogs. I am not trying to put you off as it is one of the best things I have ever done and I am loving having Rolo but it is definatley something to consider. Another thing is buy from a reputable breeder with small children you can't be too careful.

KevinK's picture
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I would be willing to wager that most good breeders would be concerned about the age of your children, and the other dogs...  Propperly raising a puppy, especially a breed that is so active and demanding when they're young is a full time job, literally.  When we brought home our puppy, I started waking up almost 2 hours early in the morning, and staying up significanltly later than normal.  This is not the kind of dog that you let out in the yard, and they just run around and are happy.  They require a TON of 1 on 1 time and interraction.  Training, socializing, exercising, providing mental stimulation, it's a HUGE time commitment.  The exercise alone, and tiring out your dog can be quite a job in and of itself... 

Let me give you a rundown of a recent "day off". lol...  Wake up, take Dakota out in the yard to do her business.  Then we play for a while, fetch, tug, chasing each other, whatever.  I usually come in exhausted...  We went for a few hour hike up the appalachian trail, and this particular trail was tough.  I quit smoking back in October, and I literally would not have been able to do this hike otherwise...  Very steep, windy, rocky path up the side of a mountain.  Dakota loves the woods, and she runs the entire time, literally.  She sprints up and down the path.  We went home, and our friends next door were out, and Dakota is good friends with these dogs.  She goes over, plays until the other dogs can't take it anymore, and have had enough...  Then she looks to me to go play some more.  We go home, relax a bit...  Go back to hang out with neighbors, have a few drinks etc.  The dogs literally go non-stop, and after the dog again lays down because he's had enough, I take Dakota out to pee.  She sprints full speed around the house about 15 times, then brings a toy for me to toss.  We let the other dogs relax a bit and catch their breath, go back in the house, and it's back to chasing each other and wrestling for a few more hours.  Then I have to keep Dakota busy, because she is still ready to go, full of energy, and everyone else just wants to go to sleep.  Rinse, repeat.

In my situation, literally, I can barely tire her out, even if we are doing very active things, and she is playing with other dogs.  I couldn't even begin to imagine how I would be able to do this with 2 young kids...  She is a pretty drivey dog, and we do bitework, nosework, regular daily training, etc.  It has been like this for the year and a half we have had her.  Now, is all of this "necessary"?  I could totally get away with not doing as much as I do...  The downside to that, is instead of making posts about how good my girl is, I would be making posts about how out of control she is, how she chews everything in the house, and gets in to trouble all the time.  That is what happens when you don't devote enough time to your dog, he/she will find their own ways to get out their energy.  And when that happens, it's usually trouble.  Dakota is one of the best dogs you could imagine having, extremely obedient, rarely gets into any kind of trouble, always listens, etc.  We don't have to worry about her taking food off our plates, or just getting in trouble around the house.  I'm not concerned with her running out of our non-fenced yard, etc.  But, she is also very demanding, and she gets almost all of my free time.  When we went on our honeymoon, we were gone for 8 days, and she stayed with my parents...  Without the same structure, exercise, etc., I almost had to "retrain" her. 

These are all things to keep in mind here.

Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

Thank you everyone for your input, We greatly appreciate. I hate to say it but it looks as if my dream of owning a Doberman is going to have to wait a little longer. (hides in bedroom for brief pitty party for self) (wipes away a few tears) Thankyou all here for your support but after doing more research and asking around I dont think a Doberman would be happy with us at the present time.....Maybe later on down the road when the kids are older and when we have our Ranch weve always wanted. I could not live with my self if something happened to Babys or Britches because I overlooked the facts and went on wishful thinking. Again I would llike to express my greatest gratitude to everyone who has helped me and givin me advice and wisdom. I will always continue to support the Doberman Breed and speak highly of these gorgeous animals, hopefully in doing so I can change some people opions from the view of them being mean and vicious to being loving, loyal family companions. 

I will stay around so dont worry about me leaving the forum. Even with not owning one I am addicted to the breed and have been for as long as I can remeber and will always be until further notice.

Amanda

Legend of Zelda's picture
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Sorry to be a downer, but bringing a female into your already stable home with two males would throw off the balance. Bringing a female into the family would make the boys want to dominate each other to dominate the girl. So, either way, have caution with either gender because, well, things can go wrong. It happened to me and my family. We brought another male into the house who already have 3 intact females (dad doesn't want to spay them -A-;; ) and my toy poodle was completely changed from a good dog to a dog that growled at anything. It's horrible. He's getting better as we retrain him to be the sweetie he was, but it's a lot of work.

Again, have caution! :)

♥Erika

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

wld-b-dobe owner -  I would suggest that you get a small crate for the chihuahua and begin crating the chihuahua at least while you are away. Better safe than sorry. I know my vet's assistant was telling me a horror story of how she had gotten a boxer as a baby around 8 weeks old and he grew up with the cats in the house and when he turned 9 years old - 9 years of great behavior and loving towards the cats she came home from work and he had killed all her cats. Since dobes are known for having their friends turn into an issue around 1 1/2-2 years old I would begin crating the chihuahua so you don't come home to a dead chihuahua. I know I love Ben my rottie and trust him with the cats and chihuahua but he is still crated every time I leave the house and chihuahua is crated for his safety so he doesn't fall off the sofa or get into something and get hurt, if I am going to be in the yard for any length of time Ben goes to the yard with me, if I know I can't watch him and make sure he isn't digging up and eating mushrooms then I crate him in the house. If I go to the mailbox and back he is trusted that long cause he will just stand at the door and watch me. But I will never take a chance with the lives of my other animals.

 

Hickory - what news do you have on collies??? very interested......was looking at a puppy to adopt what have you? :))

 

 

Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

Zelda, I do not have two males I have a male and a female... the other large male dog i talked about is living with my mother becuase he didnt not like moving away from there. He has lived his whole live of 10 yrs there. He is happy and has free roam of the seven acres with all the horse.... I thought that he was my dog but turns out he prefered my horse over me... :( Oh well at least he is happy.  In my current home with my husband we only have to two schnauzers Babys a spayed female and Britches an intact male.

 

Lori's picture
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I would think with the age of your children and having the choice I would wait until they are a bit older.  Doberman's are very active...and they don't always understand they weight 60-80+ lbs when they romp around.   Many also love to play rough....and not all but many males do not get along long-term with other males.   Females can even have the issue but it's less common....

 

sounds like you have a wonderful place to exercise them though so don't rule them out but I would probably wait a few years until the kids are older..

Hickory67's picture
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Talisin, email me at hickorypfmc@gmail.com. I can't access messages on here.

Sorry for the continued sidebar, folks - beggin your pardon.

talisin's picture
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thanks Hickory will do

rgreen4's picture
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Palomino - most breeders will not place a puppy in a home with an infant. They are too much alike, and the puppy will tend to thing of the infant as a strange looking litter mate and treat the infant to the same treatment the litter mates got. Puppy piling is fine, but the biting and struggle to determing who is higher on the pecking order is not pleasant for the infant. Then as the youngster starts the first wobbly steps, they are confronted with a rambunctous klutzy young puppy.

Once your son is walking in a stable form (not the halting stumbling initial stage) and can communicate, it would be ok to bring in a puppy. I would definitely crate train the puppy so when needed, you can give the pup a break from the kids. For a while it will seem like you have three kids, all of whom need constant supervision. It will be nice to be able to put one of them (the one with four legs) in a crate and get a break. Some might be tempted to put all three in crates, but it is frowned upon by society if they walk upright. There are member on this forum who have had children with Dobes in the house and never had a problem. It does take supervision for the Dobe probably needs more protection from the infant. When you get your pup, both of your kids will have to be taught how to pet your Dobe, as most kids that age tend to pat rather than stroke, and if they get excited pat too hard.

The forums and You Tube are full of stories and video of how a Dobe will treat youngsters and special needs adults differently than they do other adults. The perceptiveness of these animals is truly amazing. We also have several members who have or have raised babies with a Dobe in the house.

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

hahahahah rgreen that reminds me have you watched the Doris Day movie Please Don't Eat the Daisies it is so funny because she is getting ready for a date and she has one of her boys in a large crate with a padlock..... too funny see I would put the human in the crate and leave the dog out free, hahahahaha joking just joking.......How's the Jakester????

rgreen4's picture
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Joined: 2008-10-26

He is fine. He keeps getting in trouble and is always bugging Princess. He is a type rambunctuous DoberTeen, full of mischief and energy. He loves to crawl up in my lap, but only stays for a few minutes and then is of to chew on the Princess some more. After a while, I will give him a time out in his crate so Princess can get a break and rest on her pad. If he's not in he crate, he's like the Energizer Bunny - he keeps going and going and ....

talisin's picture
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oh too funny, I can see his little face now looking at what else might entertain him for a split second and OFF to find the next thing and the next thing......are you dizzy yet from watching him, hahahaha how big is he now??