Be Careful Walking your Dog on Cement !!!!

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Ruger_Armed's picture
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I just got this picture on my FB page and was alarmed but not surprised please be careful it is so hot out there I can only imagine how our poor dogs feet feel.

 

 

Legend of Zelda's picture
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oh my gosh D: So, I'm pretty sure I'm going to go get some mitts for Zelda now as much as she might hate it o-o

Ruger_Armed's picture
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I am not sure how real this picture is but it is so sad :( I hope the puppy healed ok I head Dobermans are prone to having thier pads tear off.

I see dumb*ss people walking their dogs on blacktop in the summer all the time - I just want to yell at them to take off their shoes and try walking on the blacktop (sometimes I do) - it is too freaking hot!!  light colored cement ie: most sidewalks are fine.  However, puppies and dogs that have never been exposed to cement, can really tear up their pads until they toughen up.  It is just common sense..... something that WAY too many people are sorely lacking in!!

Happydance's picture
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Sorry Fitz, but I need to take issue with your statement about light colored cement being fine.  Where I live it gets horribly hot here all summer long.  I am a barefoot kid, rarely put shoes on, and I can't even go out to get the mail and cross the small portion of the driveway barefooted in the summer. We have "cool deck" around the pool, but when you leave it and cross into the patio, it's scorching.  I usually put remnant carpet pieces down on that area.

It never ceases to amazing me about how people don't think about these things. I've seen it over and over again at the vet hospital. When my son is over visiting and wants to take Fancy out in the late afternoon (hottest part of the day here), and although I'm thrilled that she would get another walk, I refuse to let him. Although dog's pads are much tougher, they are still flesh!

Lady Kate's picture
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And P.S. The sand on your favorite beach can do damage as well.. Please protect those paddy paws just as you do yours.

I guess the sidewalks around here are different - they don't get very hot....now the driveways and streets are a different dealie.

Ruger_Armed's picture
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I live in Alberta Calgary so ours do not get that hot but I can only imagine how some of the states get espessially right now with the heat wave it is 30 celcius here today and we took Ruger to the River but he could hardly handle the dog park he kept on running into the shade.

talisin's picture
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I see people all the time walking their dogs in scorching heat and the dog will be panting and I worry so much, their stupidity may kill their dog. I am usually in a car driving by and see someone walking their dog like today a small long haired chihuahua with a pre-teen girl walking it in the sun and the poor thing had it's tongue hanging way out and trying to get in the shade and she kept pulling it out in the sun. The sidewalks here do get VERY hot and I can see where those foot pads in the pic could be a result of hot sidewalks. It would be great to think that with all the new sidewalks we are getting that there is some additive in them to keep them cooler than the norm. It's been 99 degrees here for two weeks now and that's unusual but I can only imagine the animals that have to walk on the asphalt and concrete........

jerial13's picture
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We make sure to keep a path for Shelbi on the wooden deck.  Believe me that wood gets hot unless it has some shade on it.  She has learned to stay close to the house on really hot days the eave offers enough shade she can get off the deck to potty.  Althoug I jokingly call her Panzy Paws because I can spend more time walking barefoot on gravel than she can.  I have tried to get her used to it, but she is still "Panzy Paws" on it.

Jeri

Wolfgirl_121's picture
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Skyler has walked on the cement her whole life and while I'm not going to make her walk on the sidewalk, I actually encourage her to walk in the grass next to it, she insists that she must walk on the sidewalk, no matter how hot it is out. I have started to use an Aloe-vera gel on her feet when we get in, just in case, but she has never shown any signs of having issues with her feet. I think they may be made of steel... lol. Seriously though, the pavement gets so hot that I have put a pen cap out there and come back an hour later to find it melted.  Watch your puppers for any kind of stress when out on a walk and ALWAYS, no matter the temperature, check their little toes.

NINKOjIN's picture
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That's so sad! I saw this picture elsewhere earlier, and it made me very concious of where my dog was walking all week. I even felt the ground in certain areas I know he likes to stay on. I'm surprised he can stand it sometimes. I encourage him to stay on the grass, also, but he still will go on surfaces I don't feel like he should. I guess it can't be hurting him though if he does it on his own. At least I hope not. His feet look fine anyway.

Bryzo's picture
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First and foremost, this picture is of a dog whose owner left him on a rooftop for 10 hours, not from walking on the sidewalk.  Dont believe everything you see/read.  10+ hrs on a rooftop is a bit different then walking your dog on the sidewalk for an hour.  From BARC Humane Society: "This photo was sent to us reading that the dog had burnt paws from being on pavement. The original article was located by one of the readers of this post. This dog was left on a hot rooftop on "pavement" for 10 hours. Although normal people would not leave a dog on hot pavement for 10 hours, it does raise awareness that dog's paws will burn."

Additionally, a young pup will get burned walking on hot surfaces as the paws have not had time to get caliced over.  With that being said, older dogs who have been walked on concrete/pavement and whose paws are caliced over shouldn't have any problems.  I live in AZ where it gets a tad warm in the summer.  I walk my dog when I get home from work every evening at 5pm.  Furthermore, when I was in the middle east, we used dogs for bomb sniffing and security details.  The desert heat is a lot hotter there and we had no problems with those dogs walking on concrete and sand. 

It may be wise to ask yourself how many times you've seen a police dog or Border patrol K-9 wear booties in the summer in AZ or the middle east...my answer is never. 

talisin's picture
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This is still an issue, regardless of what caused that severe of a burn, pads are just like our fingertips and toes and if it's too hot for our fingers or toes then your dog doesn't need to be walking on it for any length of time. Some places have different components in their sidewalks than other areas, and same for asphalt, asphalt will be much hotter than concrete so be extra aware for asphalt burns. If you notice while walking your dog they display tiredness or trying to slow down when normally that distance would be nothing or they are trying to get on the grass they are probably saying their pads are hurting. Blisters like the above are not to be expected but they can get small blisters or red/raw spots that can get infected........and the reason that most dogs don't wear booties for any length of time is that the booties cause the feet to sweat which can be just as bad for infections and breakouts, so you have to take the lesser of two evils so to speak......

Bryzo's picture
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Talisin:

I agree that pads/paws are just like our toes, in the sense that we walk on them and use them to move around.  We, as humans, use shoes on a daily basis.  Now look at indigenous tribes in third world countries that don't use shoes.  Mainly the tribes in Africa don't wear shoes and walk around with no problems.  Most of us here in the US wouldn't be able to handle that, and the reason being is we are not used to it.  We don't have the same tolerance because our feet have not had the opportunity to get accustomed to that type of calice.  Also, take into consideration that the animals in Africa (mainly the felines of those areas and Hyenas) have pads and paws also. 

I'm not saying that the aforementioned picture is ok.  Its sad and sickening that it happened.  I'm just saying that common sense should be taken when having an animal, and that dogs that are older won't have the same issues if they're used to walking on the concrete and their paws have been caliced.  If anything, we can agree to disagree; as I'm convinced of point after being privy first hand to the things I've seen with dogs and the desert heat.

talisin's picture
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Yes I agree we disagree on this one. I have seen dogs with burned pads from just walking, when I worked in the vet hospital. I actually am barefoot (25 years) all the time unless I go to the grocery store or out in public and my foot is as you say calloused but I still cannot walk on the hot concrete, especially asphalt. Dogs pads are not callouses they are pads that they sweat through and cool their body so there are other issues with walking dogs on hot surfaces it can dehydrate them too. Dogs each have different feet and pads some cannot take the heat, others might be able to, but having seen burned pads I can say also from experience it happens frequently due to concrete/asphalt and long walks. And I live in a cooler part of the state NC and it still happened here so I would like to let people know it can happen and be aware of your dogs reactions and body language while out on a hot day, and check the pads frequently to avoid burns. We are talking about domesticated animals not wild ones......

Bryzo's picture
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Talisin,

Callous (Calice) was a probably a poor choice of words, and even a poorer spelling, but not sure what else to call the roughing of an adult K-9's paws compared to the softness of a puppies paws.  I know that some dogs can get burned while running on a hot surface; I'm assuming from the amount of friction that is generated by running, as opposed to walking?  I know that they sweat through the pads, I've been told that they also sweat through their nose, although a minute amount...any truth to that?

The dogs that were used in the middle east were either GSD, or Belgian Mal's.  The temps where I was (Kuwait) were around 130*F during the summer.  It was even hotter on the flight line with jet engines running. 

Thanks for the info - something to keep in mind during our summer months here in AZ.

talisin's picture
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Yes, Bryzo you are right the nose is another area they sweat, another reason people shouldn't pop their dogs in the nose it can damage the nose in minute ways that we never see but they can feel; dogs have very few places that sweat unlike us we can sweat seemingly anywhere, they are limited which means they can overheat faster than we can. They also have a higher heart rate making heat exhaustion faster......I know the callous thing was something that I honestly felt Ben had when we first got him, never having had a rottweiler I thought to myself "wow he has some really tough pads I wonder if that's indicative of rotties" so I kept feeling of his foot pads and one foot just felt so calloused over but the more I felt it the more I thought this can't be right, and it turned out his callous was actually his foot pad peeling off, poor baby, and that's how we learned he had this auto immune disorder. Foot pads are something that sometimes get overlooked by vets in diagnosing conditions, but they do tell alot about the dog's condition if you have someone that can interpret the signs. I guess it's like us when the doctor chastizes us for not taking care of our feet, we should be more aware of what happens to our dogs feet, I mean how many people actually look to see if their dogs feet got cut on something while out walking at the beach or park?? Might be something we should all do now that people seem to throw all sorts of dangerous things down on the ground........

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From BARC Humane Society: "This photo was sent to us reading that the dog had burnt paws from being on pavement. The original article was located by one of the readers of this post. This dog was left on a hot rooftop on "pavement" for 10 hours. Although normal people would not leave a dog on hot pavement for 10 hours, it does raise awareness that dog's paws will burn."

Someone needs to sent to the gallows pole ^, as for walking dogs in the summer, please do your walking activitys after sun down, i love walking at night with Sheeba, i think my neighbors like me walking her when it's dark as well.  

 

 

jerial13's picture
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us we can sweat seemingly anywhere - posted by Talisin

All I wanted to add is "Isn't that the truth"

Tolerances are different whether human or animal, I always keep in mind that if I wouldn't do it, I wouldn't ask Shelbi to either. 

I too am a barefoot person, I have no problem on concrete, I stay off the asphalt, but I can run like a deer on gravel.  Shelbi is still having a hard time with the gravel, so I limit her exposure, not completly but I will just have her wait in our shop sometimes while I run back and forth to the house, instead of making both trips with me.  She will stay there with her Daddy and watch me go back and forth.

Bryzo - I would have used Callous also I do not know what the clinical term is for the toughening of canine pads.

Jeri & Shelbi

talisin's picture
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Jerial - Ben won't walk on our tiny white gravel that we have as a walkway and driveway so I do the same, if I am going anywhere in the yard I make him wait for me especially since his right front foot is where his pemphigus flares up; so better safe than sorry, and he chooses to avoid the walkway when he goes out to potty, it's kinda hard but we will have to come up with a different walking surface next spring for him. You can see him going "ouch, ouch" all the way across the walkway, he has to cover about 4 feet before he's back on decking but he hates that 4 feet.

jerial13's picture
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12 inch by 12 inch walking squares.  All you would have to do is move some gravel out of the way.  I am certian he will figure out the squares and walk on them.  I would love to do this but we have a gravel lot, and gravel driveway except one section in front and it is asphalt in a "U" shape.

Jeri

talisin's picture
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That's true, I did have a concrete square that had the gone with the wind house TARA molded into the concrete and I did that, I just pushed it into the gravel and it stayed, forgot I could use those types of squares - I will look into that, thanks for reminding me, I had thought of that a long time ago but it was winter and didn't think much about it when spring arrived. Jog my memory thanks.....

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I'm glad to hear from BARC that the culprit was 10 hours on the roof. BARC, by the way is local non-kill shelter program. We have only the tiniest of yards with no space to exercise, which means we have to take her out on the sidewalks and cross streets with her. The heat has been brutal this summer and for us too, so we're never out that long and we stick to the shady sides. Still, except in the thunderstorms, Kerry is eager to go out. If her feet got too hot I think she would -- as she does if she hears thunder -- pull us back home as fast as she can.