Can the breeders here help me to better understand????

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Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

I  have beenlooking in to other breeders the last couple of days. Not because the breeder I had talk to wont work  its jus that she most likely doesnt think that she will have what I want/need. A Black female. She is only expecting about 6 puppies (Accourding to the ultrasound that was done on the bitch) and from what I can understand alot of the people on her waiting list want a black female. :( so I am in search of other breeders just in case.

A lot of those breeders would like a puppy questionaire filled out. I have no problem filling one out. I am just trying to understand why some of the questions are relevant and what they are looking for when asking these questions. Some seem a little personal. Maybe I just lead too much of a privte life.... LOL.

So here are some of the questions that I need a little explination on. ( I apologize if this is somewhat of a dumb request)

1. Have you ever had dogs before? (I understand that to mean if I have any expericence with dogs), What breeds? What happened to them? ( why does a breeder need to know what happened to my dogs of 

2. Are you married? (why does that matter in the decision as to if Im a good home for a puppy, Im the same person married, single, or divorced.)

3. are you agreeable to a home visit before you recieve a puppy? (hmmmm..... why?)

4. Have you ever had to return a dog to a breeder,Taken it to a shelter or had it euthanized? Circumstances? (Why are the decisions of my mother have anything to do with the dogs I have now? Because my mother has taken dogs to the shelter and had to have a couple dogs euthanized do to illnes or car injuries. But they were dogs I grew up with and of course I was too young to make a rational decision.)

5. How long have you lived at your current address? Do you plan to move in the next year? (this sounds like more of a renters agreement type question or a loan application. why does this matter when buying  a puppy. the puppy will go where I go weather its to the farm or across the country)

 

I know some of my remarks are a little on the harsh side but I dont know how else to explain my confusion. I want to make sure I understand fully what is being asked of me so that i can answer it as truthfully as possible instead of trying to guess what they want. I want to be as true to my self and my intention as possible so that they can find the perfect match to fit my family.

Thank you in advance for your helping me to understand.

Amanda W.

KevinK's picture
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Joined: 2010-07-15

Pet Profiles

They all make perfect sense, here's why:

1) If you were a breeder, and someone had 6 dogs, and turned them all into shelters because they didn't want them anymore, would you give them a dog?  Also, just to get an idea of your experience with dogs.

2) If your husband/wife hates dogs, and doesn't want one, a good breeder is not very likely to place a dog in that home.

3) To make sure that you have adequette space, and living conditions for a dog.

4) Just be honest...  They're looking to weed out people who will just give up if there are any problems.

5) This matters because many apartments will not allow dobermans, and many home insurance companies will not cover homes with dobermans.  So, stable living conditions is definitely something worth asking.  One of the biggest reasons dogs are turned in is because people move, and their new place will not allow dogs.

Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

ok first off I want to thank you for your response. I geatly appreciate it. 

But when asked where I live doesnt that answer the question # 5? why do you need to ask both? If you have dogs wouldnt you make sure when you move you find a place that allows the pets you have because they are part of the family, at least thats what they  are considered in my family.

Like I said in the orginal post I dont mean to sound rude or harsh just trying to get the answers I need with out having to beat around the bush. I have learned that it is best to ask the direct questions instead of trying to ask it in a manner that only gets the answers that people think you are asking. 

Again thank you so much for your time in answering my questions. 

If anyone else has any more insight I  would greatly appreciate it. Not that your input KevinK wasnt very helpful and informative because it was. I just like to get several opionions if you know what I mean.

Again thank you

Amanda

 

glengate's picture
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Joined: 2009-07-22

1. What happened to your previous dogs speaks volumes about how you cared for them (or not).  If you had 6 dogs all hit on the road in front of your house (like my stupid sister-in-law), it speaks to irresponsibility.  As a breeder, I want to hear that the previous dogs spent their lives with the potential owner and weren't given away at the drop of a hat, and were kept safely throughout their lives. 

By the way, the fact that you're asking what the breeder wants to hear rather than just providing the answers whatever they are makes me nervous. 

2.  Obviously, if you're married there is another person to consider as a potential owner.  It wouldn't just be you owning the dog.  The spouse must be on board.  Some breeders draw a line on young, married couples likely to have kids soon because that is also a key time that dogs are given up.  Or they may be concerned that a single person doesn't have enough time or resources for dog ownership. 

3.  Home visits are routinely done by rescues, and some breeders.  I've certainly done some as a breeder and as someone involved in rescue.  It's a quick way to determine if people are being honest about where they live, whether they indeed have a fence, etc. 

4.  I don't know why you're going on about what your mother did.  The breeder isn't asking about your mother, they're asking if YOU did this.  The question again speaks to general attitudes about dogs, how easily they were given up on or were they euthanized because of things that could have been worked with/on? 

5.  People give up dogs all of the time because they move.  Have you ever looked at the kijiji ads or hoobly ads or ads in the paper.  Moving, can't keep dog, can't take dog ... etc.  Breeders are looking for stable homes.  Living in one place for a long time often means stability. 

Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

Glengate, first Thank you for your respose. I greatly appreciate the blountness of you answers. But let me clearify one thing. I am not looking for answers that breeders want to hear I am trying to better understand the questions so that I may answer as truthfully as possible because I fully understand the question, instead of giving a partial answer because I dont fully understand the question. Like my original post stated I just need clarification.

So when they ask about my previous dogs they are asking about the ones that I have owned personally? so that would be my current dogs, the two schnauzers living with me and my lab that didnt handle the city and I opted to leave at my moms  because that is where he is happiest.

I understand that some people sell or give away there dogs due to moving or having kids. But since I already have two kids and my husband and my self consider our dogs family so this will not be an issue. .

But anyway thank you so much for your time. I really do appreciate it. I dont mean that to be a snide remark either. I really do appreciate everyones input and opinion.

Again thank you for your time.

Amanda W.

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

1. Have you ever had dogs before? (I understand that to mean if I have any expericence with dogs), What breeds? What happened to them? ( why does a breeder need to know what happened to my dogs of

I work in rescue and we ask the same questions and then some. We want to know what happened because if you say "hit by car" then we are going ask more questions to find out why/how that happened cause if you are careless then you won't be approved for adoption. The type of Breed is important because if you all you have had experience with is say a beagle and you want to adopt a Rottweiler there is a huge learning curve to be able to work with the rottie instead of a beagle so we might help you find a trainer or classes etc. to help you better understand the breed you are about to adopt. I would think breeders would be doing something similar.

2. Are you married? (why does that matter in the decision as to if Im a good home for a puppy, Im the same person married, single, or divorced.)

As stated before another person in the household means that that other person needs to be on board with the choice of dog/adoption and we would want to know what their experience level is with the breed for the same reasons as above, if you need help integrating the people and dog then we are there to help. But we can't help unless we know how many people are in the household. Plus if there are children that can change the particular dog you might be interested in to another more suitable temperament more suitable to children.

3. are you agreeable to a home visit before you recieve a puppy? (hmmmm..... why?)

This is very important! If you say for instance on your adoption app that you have a fenced in yard and the home check proves you live on the 3rd story of an apartment building and there is no yard then you lied and cannot take proper care of your dog without the yard. The home check double checks to make sure your home is puppy proof if you are choosing a puppy, adult suitable with no obvious things that could harm the dog, or if adopting a senior dog not too many steps that sort of thing. Home checks are there to help make sure the right dog is going to the right home situation. If you have a yappy little dog next door and the dog you want is known to show intolerance to little dogs then we would suggest a dog that is tolerant of little dogs, so home checks are imperative to the success of placement and I am sure breeders feel the same.

4. Have you ever had to return a dog to a breeder,Taken it to a shelter or had it euthanized? Circumstances? (Why are the decisions of my mother have anything to do with the dogs I have now? Because my mother has taken dogs to the shelter and had to have a couple dogs euthanized do to illnes or car injuries. But they were dogs I grew up with and of course I was too young to make a rational decision.)

This question let's the rescue/breeder know if you are someone who habitually takes animals to the shelter if they become to much to handle or you get bored. If you had a dog put down we want to know why so that we are not placing a dog in a home that will regularly let their dog out to play unsupervised and get hit by a car. How you make decisions concerning your dog are very important to us before placing another life your hands. After all it is a life you are asking to be handed over to you and we refuse to do that on a leap of faith - we want to know the dog is safe and will not be destroyed just because you got bored or the dog got sick with something simple or treatable.

5. How long have you lived at your current address? Do you plan to move in the next year? (this sounds like more of a renters agreement type question or a loan application. why does this matter when buying a puppy. the puppy will go where I go weather its to the farm or across the country)

It's amazing how many people will adopt or buy a dog and then within the week move to a new home. The reason behind this question is to ensure that there is not stress overload on the dog from too many new experiences. If you answer that you are moving within the month or two months we will typically offer to keep the dog until you are situated in your new home, again we can't help in this case unless we have the answers. And WAY TOO MANY people will move and leave their dogs behind or drop them at a shelter. Moving is very stressful to a dog who even within a year is still trying to figure out their place in the household, we want to make sure that the new place your going to will also accept animals so many people will not think ahead to whether they CAN take their dogs they just agree to move and then lo and behold they can't take the dog because it's not allowed and rather than pay another deposit to move again they dump the dog somewhere. So these are very important questions. Plus if it comes to light that you have a habit of moving every year or so then a dog might not be a good choice as it will be too stressful to keep moving the dog around like that.

All these questions ensure that the best dog is matched to the household, that if the people need help transitioning the dog into the house that they have the help they need, if they need trainers that they get assistance, that if they need understanding of puppy proofing their home that there is that help; that if the situation is not the best for the dog chosen that the group/breeder can then recommend a different dog that will fit in better. Breeders know their puppies and know which puppy will fit what situation and it helps immensely to actually see the home that the puppy/dog will live in, and the neigborhood and highway situations for the safety of the life they will be entrusting you with.

I hope that helps, working with dogs whether in rescue or as breeders, we all seem to use approximately the same type of criteria to ensure a safe and loving home for any life that is being purchased or adopted. The check list for the rottie rescue I work with is 4 pages long, not 5 questions, and we call the vet, we call references, we call the landlord if the person is renting; we do the home check etc. Since you consider your dog to be a family member then see this as if you were sending your child to live with someone, would you want to know the answers to these questions before you sent your child to live with these people?? I bet you would have more questions than just these 5.

AlphaAdmin's picture
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Joined: 2010-01-18

Pet Profiles

Long intrusive lists of questions are a sign of a good breeder. Put yourself in their place. These people spend a crazy amount of time taking care of their dogs and puppies. If they're not paranoid about accidentally putting a dog in a bad home, that's bad. What if you gave a puppy to someone who seemed perfectly responsible, and a year or two later you found out they were giving the dog beer, which lead to it having seizures? What if you, as the local Doberman expert, were contacted about a Doberman left at an abandoned home, then found out it was one of your puppies? 

You'd add another set of intrusive questions to your puppy application too...  

Palomino's picture
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Joined: 2011-11-25

Thank you to eveyone who has responded. I realize that to most these question seem basic and reasonalbe but to someone like me who has never gone through a breeder or rescue to get a dog/puppy they seem to go overboard. But now that you guys have answered my questions I have a better understanding why the questions are SO important. The puppy questionnaires are more than just 5 questions long, these are just the ones that seemed a little confusing as to why they needed to know the answers.

Again thank you all for your responses. I joined this forum to learn and gain knowledge so that when I did start this process I have a better understanding and so that I will also be more confident in this new chapter in my life.

I greatly appreciate all of your input.

Amanda W.

 

talisin's picture
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Joined: 2011-02-25

That's what this forum is for to help educate those who truly want to learn and expand their knowledge base. So glad to hear that we were of help to you. I know I had some crazy questions sent my way when I wanted to adopt a rescue doberman.. it does help to know why some things are requested....