Doberman Excercise Routine?

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jckaw7's picture
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As office dwellers, we humans need a regular exercise routine. Also, we need to switch that routine up regularly. Is a Doberman the same? What sort of exercise should a Doberman get? Is the standard nighttime four block walk enough?

AlphaAdmin's picture
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Owning a Doberman also includes owning, or having continual access to, a large area outside. No human can exercise a Doberman. Even an athlete who runs with his dog is only giving such a high performance creature moderate exertion.

If you have more than one Doberman, the answer is easy – an average of four hours outside in a space large enough for top-speed running for time to be goofy.

If you don’t have another dog, playing fetch or just letting him be goofy on his own in an open space will do. Remember, the Doberman was made to put in a full day’s work, not to sit around all day and go for a short walk.

This is actually one of the big questions a prospective Doberman parent should ask: will I have the time and ability to ensure my Doberman gets enough exercise. Training is good exercise too. It’s also important for making exercise easier.

Training a Doberman to pick up all the sticks in the yard perhaps? Who knows. Dobermans love to work and need it!

Schlehuber2's picture
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My husband and I are talking about getting a Doberman when we finally have a large enough space for them - apartment barely fits the two of us...

Anyway, I like to play soccer and have seen people playing soccer with their dogs (ie the dog tries to steal the ball away etc.). Do you think a Dobe would be interested in such things if started from a pup?

Also, we play a lot of frisbee - the Aerobie 100+ ft flying kind - do Dobes enjoy "fly-frisbee"?

Thanks!

AlphaAdmin's picture
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The Doberman enjoys chasing and tackling anything that moves, so yes - to everything. It's funny, my male even chases after birds that fly by the yard, but when I feed him outside he doesn't mind those same birds standing next to him eating out of his food bowl.

I'd be careful playing soccer with a young dog. By young I mean old enough to weigh just a little less than you and young enough to be too goofy take your long term health into regard. In other words, it's really easy to get knocked down by a playful young Doberman. When they get a little older they learn to be careful. It's quite amazing actually. I can't believe how fast a Doberman can respond in fast situations. I've seen some cool stuff.

Our youngest girl, Jewel, she's feisty - being the smallest too, was once laying by my feet. The other Dobermans were around and they each had a bone. Jewel gets very protective of her bones so when one of the other dogs bothers her she bites them (nice bites - but hard - warning bites maybe). So, I decided to give her a little scratch on the back. As soon as I touched her, and before I could pull away or even blink, she lurch around with a mouth full of polished white teeth, fully intent on bitting who ever was giving her business about her bone. Within this tenth of a second, with me still without the ability to react, and about an inch away, she realized it was me and her ugly attack face turned back into pretty-Jewel and her bitting teeth turned into about three or four quick little licks before my poor human reflexes demanded that I jerk my hand away. Amazing! I'm sure glad she likes me.

Another good one was Drayko, our male. The get to playing out back and don't watch were they're going. I had put a baby pool up right next to the garden fence for them to swim in. Drayko was chasing and playing at high speed and forgot about the pool and garden. A the last minute he saw them. At his speed he couldn't stop so with a quick pulse of Doberman muscle he became air born and cleared to whole thing. He was higher than four feet and flew at least ten. Yes - our chain length fence is a psychological obstacle.

A Doberman will love playing any game you teach him. He'll put everything into it too. And they love keep-away games. You might want to invest in a bullet-proof soccer ball though.

Schlehuber2's picture
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Thank you so much for the reply, horseatingweeds!

That is great information. My husband and I are really looking forward to being able to have such a strong, playful, and loving dog. The bullet-proof soccer ball is a great point. :)

Rileysmama's picture
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Joined: 2008-06-13

My 10 week pup is rediculously lazy and would rather curl up in the house then go for a walk. I do go for 3 20 min pack walks with him and my husky though. I guess not all dogs have the same energy level despite the breed statistics.  Maybe he'll grow out of it. I hope not, it suits us.  8)

AlphaAdmin's picture
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You have to understand he is very much a puppy at 10 weeks. In the wild, this puppy might not have even seen the sun yet. All of his energy is for growing. So however, you'll see the energy of the Doberman Pinscher.

jncwhitt's picture
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Joined: 2008-07-29

I'm a runner and Axil is 14 weeks old.  Should I wait until he's about six months before taking him with me?  I know you said we can't really exercise a doberman properly by just running, but at 14 weeks I wonder if he's to young.  Also being that he's growing so quickly, maybe I should wait a while.  I think I just answered my own question.  It's hilarious to watch him run and fall over those long legs and huge paws trying to catch our peekapoo. We have a nice size yard for him to run in and he runs a lot with our other dog, but I want him to run with me eventually. 

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If you have a big yard that's great. All Doberman owners really should. That open space will allow him most the exercise he needs especially with other dogs, as long as he does the normal Doberman male things of charging across the yard fifteen times for fun, then trotting around for the next hour sprinkling everything.  ;D

A note of caution, while he's growing so fast, until about a year of age, it's good to keep him from to much exertion. Games where he chases a ball are great, but not until he's older - the acceleration. Running with his handler is good too, more so for the bonding and assertion of dominance though. Like you said, running next to a human is not workout for a Doberman. Right now he's way to young to even keep up with you yet. Around six months of age he'll start to get his stamina. He'll be a great running partner then, as long as you train him good obedience and how to walk on a lead. Until then walk are good - for socialization.