Creating a Strong Bond With Your Puppy...IMPORTANT!

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tragas's picture
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Joined: 2007-10-19

I love this one, in all the dobermans I have had in life, this teqnice never ever failed, I had every dog of mine keeping and eye on ME, and None of them Ever ran off one me, not even once, if done properly, it's basically using revers phsycology.

I socialize my puppy with other puppies as much as possible. Again, this is supervised and can be accomplished by attending puppy kindergarten or contacting friends with puppies.

I do not recommend doing formalized puppy obedience at a young age unless it is totally noncompulsive.
I also do not allow my puppy contact with unknown adults dogs regardless of their owner’s assurance that the dog is social. Too many owners of dog aggressive dogs are in total denial. One attack can have disastrous consequences on your puppy’s temperament
and further interactions with other dogs. A particularly aggressive dog could permanently disfigure or even kill your puppy.

Even though I work from home, I confine my puppy in a safe area during the majority of the day such as a backyard, kennel run, kennel crate, or deck. When I release the puppy from this area, I am always very exciting and enthusiastic.
I bring a toy or treats and act delighted to have the puppy jump on me. I pet and praise and create intense amounts of verbal and physical
interaction. I then may play chase, attention or retrieve games. It is important that it is only you and the puppy and that this interaction is the highlight of the puppy’s day.

This is my favorite:

Take your puppy for walks, off leash if possible, in the park or woods. If her attention lags, and the puppy walks up ahead of  you,
quickly run and hide behind a tree. When she finds you, reward her with praise and a treat. The next time you hide, she should find you more rapidly. Eventually, and so on,,,she will always keep an eye on you so that you don’t escape from her sight.

Teach your puppy to do play retrieves of a ball or bone. When the puppy returns with the toy, either trade him a treat for the object or throw another toy in the opposite direction after he drops the first one. Do not create conflict by trying to take her toy with no reward. Doing this will cause your puppy to stop retrieving and to start teasing you with the toy and playing keep away.

Play tug of war with your puppy but never get in her face and growl at her. If she growls during play, reduce the level of the fight you are giving her so that she does not need to growl. Never allow your puppy to bite you in anger. This is very important.

A puppy allowed to do this becomes a dangerous adult that does not understand her place in the world. Do whatever is necessary to correct this behavior but do not go overboard and damage the puppy’s temperament.

Whenever my puppy steals socks or other off-limits items, I make her bring them to me and I trade her for food. If she drops it en route, I make her return to pick it up and then I say, “trade” and make the exchange. I put the object in front of her face and say, “this is a phooey.” Then I put the forbidden object away and that is the end of it. I never chase my puppy for stealing things or hit her. As the puppy becomes an adult, she will lose interest in these items because she did not receive negative attention and reinforcement for the undesirable behaviors.

NoraJ's picture
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Joined: 2007-10-05

That is an interesting approach. How do you prevent the problem of jumping later in life though? I would worry allowing a puppy to jump on you might start a bad habbit when they get big.

tragas's picture
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Joined: 2007-10-19

Hi NoraJ,

Good point, I'm always either sitting on the floor or laying on the floor, allow him to jump and play all over me, ( just as he played with his litter mates)  ONLY within the first couple of day's of him being in his new home, to get used to the idea of a crate, new home, family members, and is excellent for bonding with his brand new owner.

iamintense's picture
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Joined: 2007-10-03

We brought home a puppy and tried to keep him in a cage until we were comfortable with him being out alone.  He hated it and tore up the cage and broke the plastic sheet on the bottom.  We eventually gave in and let him free, starting with short periods of time, when we weren't home.  Other than the occasional stuffed animal (not his toy) in the middle of the living room floor with a missing eye, he was fine.

AlphaAdmin's picture
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Joined: 2010-01-18

Pet Profiles

Yes, iamintense, but this is often the exception - especially with Doberman puppies. The Doberman puppy is VERY strong and VERY smart. Their active mind makes them look for stimulating things to do and that same active mind makes them able to get into all kinds of trouble. Puppies less than a year or year and a half should be kenneled when not under supervision. They can destroy things and can put themselves in danger - they don't have fear either.

Only a well trained Doberman should be allowed to roam the house unsupervised - for your sake and theirs. It also depends on the personality of the dog. Our Stormee is four and she still looks for trouble. Jewel, our other girl, even as a puppy has never been a trouble maker. Then there's Drayko, our male. He's not a trouble maker but he's about as smart as a dog can be. He can open doors and reach whatever I can reach, so, when he looks for trouble he finds it.

I comes down to training and the dog learning the rules and limitations of the home.

copper's picture
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Joined: 2008-04-09

Hello,

Can you please tell me whether it is a good idea to bring in two doberman pups , one male and one female, should there be an age difference kept to live with my father who is more than 72?

iamintense's picture
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Joined: 2007-10-03

As Sun Tzu once said, management of the many is the same as management of the few.  It is a matter of organization.  Also, the good thing about having two puppies is that they can play with each other (not likely with a puppy and an older dog who doesn't want to play) and wear each other out.