When does it get easier?

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captainkirk's picture
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Joined: 2020-06-05

Hi all, I'm brand new here, but looking to hear about some other folk's experiences!  I have a wonderful, friendly, curious and very playful 3 month old puppy. 

This is our first doberman, and it's been lots of fun, but also lots of work.  He doesn't have any real serious issues, but lots of bad puppy habits that we're working on - noteably, if we don't have a toy in our hands, our hands become the toys!  7-11 pm he also gets "the zoomies" and is extra-bitey and energetic, oh boy!  We've been putting him in his crate more often than we'd like, just because he is so out of control, jumping up on us, on the furniture and not listening when we say "no." 

I work from home, which is also a blessing and a curse.  I'd like to one day be able to have him in my office while I work, but that just isn't feasible for the moment!  When did other's pups stop dobersharking?  When were you able to watch television or a movie with them remaining calm?  When did you see the light at the end of the tunnel?  I guess I might just have a case of the "puppy blues" - we're going to see a trainer and get more help, and I know it will also get better with time (maybe when he's 6 months??), but right now, I'm feeling quite anxious about being a good dobermom and also going a little crazy!

The rule of thumb is that they start getting a brain at about 18 months - so you have a ways to go - hahahahahahahaha!!

That said, they will get better with work. There is nothing wrong with a few hours of crate time at his age.... as long as it's not a lot of hours in a row.  Sometimes that out of control play is really almost like a very tired toddler that just won't stop but is very cranky - they really do need a routine. 

I would recommend looking for a puppy class for socializing and learning manners - not really big time training yet at his age.  Then start a basic class at about 6-7 months of age.  Tiring them out is not just about the physical - but also the mental exersize. Spending time every day getting him to focus on some basic obedience is really good for him. 

anniesullivan's picture
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Joined: 2020-06-11

It was easier when my girl got well past the teething months.  "Dobershark" is funny but true.  Evening zoomies - yep.  It was hard to engage in activity with a pup that easily escalated into spinning and barking.  A pair of good leather work gloves were very useful for handling her gently and avoiding nips. The Kong Wobbler is a great tool for redirect.  What does your puppy have to chew?  Glad you said the "T" word (trainer).  Being still in the same room with her -- maybe 9 months.  I mostly used a separate room to watch television.  I have to use pet gates because of my cats, but they were also an alternative to putting her in crate.  Sometimes she really was and still is the child who needs to nap in a separate room (she's 2 yrs old now).  

DobermanGuy's picture
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Joined: 2017-12-11

This is our first doberman, and it's been lots of fun, but also lots of work.  He doesn't have any real serious issues, but lots of bad puppy habits that we're working on - noteably, if we don't have a toy in our hands, our hands become the toys!  7-11 pm he also gets "the zoomies" and is extra-bitey and energetic, oh boy!  We've been putting him in his crate more often than we'd like, just because he is so out of control, jumping up on us, on the furniture and not listening when we say "no." 

I work from home, which is also a blessing and a curse.  I'd like to one day be able to have him in my office while I work, but that just isn't feasible for the moment!  When did other's pups stop dobersharking?  When were you able to watch television or a movie with them remaining calm?  When did you see the light at the end of the tunnel?

That is one of the downsides to raising a single puppy at a time. YOU have to teach them 'bite inhibition'. When raising pairs or raising a single puppy around other dogs - The other dog(s) teach them / help them learn that stuff.

No tolerance here for getting on the furniture if not 'invited'. Invited generally means me putting a special dog blanket down for them before calling them up. They quickly learn to associate that blanket with them being allowed up. No blanket = No being allowed up.

My rescue dog has been here almost 2 years and pretty much learned she has NO couch privileges at all no matter if there is a blanket or not. Too much hair on her so no way she is going to be allowed on any of my furniture. My home - My rules. If you are consistent with rules you set the dogs learn them faster.

 

As far as taking your dog to work is concerned -

 

 

Something that I have noticed about Dobermans over the years and grown to appreciate is how easy it is to fairly quickly and completely, selectively desensitize them to most anything you can dream up.