First time and accidental doberman mum

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daisydoo's picture
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Joined: 2020-08-04

Hello everyone!

It's nice to meet you. I've been trawling through these forums for a few months now, so figured it was finally time to introduce myself.

I currently live in South Korea, and as of March this year I have been the owner of a female doberman, called Daisy. However, this has been entirely by accident. Here is my story.

 I visited a shelter here in March, with the intention of adopting a jindo dog, or an elderly dog. Despite big dogs being somewhat frowned upon by a lot of people here in Korea (especially older people, and especially people in the more "rural" cities like the one I live in) I decided I would not rule out adopting a bigger dog, maybe around 15kg max (this is considered huge in SK). That's when I saw Daisy, and instantly fell in love with her (at that time she was called Tantan). When I asked about her, the shelter told me she couldn't walk, and was therefore considered somewhat unadoptable. Sure enough, when they took Daisy out the tiny cage she was being kept in, she could barely stand, let alone walk. Terrified she would be euthanized, I adopted her that day. 

Here's the accidental part. 

The shelter told me Daisy was 8 months old, and a daschund mix. I noticed she had big paws, so figured she was maybe mixed with a jindo, and would be a relatively large dog by Korean standards (but at 8 months old, would be unlikely to grow a lot more). Having never seen a doberman puppy, let alone any actual doberman in real life, I took their word for it.~~~ Some more background; dobermans are incredibly rare and incredibly expensive here in SK. But they are becoming more popular, and are considered "designer dogs". So the chances of finding one in a shelter right now are close to zero, though I sadly expect this to change when people start to realise the level of care involved, and abandon them :-(

 

The first vet we took Daisy too seemed confused about her mixed breed, but gave us our first surprise: Daisy was not 8 months old. She was around 2 months old. Oh wow, a little baby. Though I did suspect she was younger than 8 months when I got get home and noticed her sharp little baby teeth.

 

Only a few days after arriving at her new home, Daisy became very ill. I took her to another, larger vet who confirmed that Daisy had severe pneumonia and would likely not make it through the night. He said it is probable that she caught in the shelter, or while abandoned on the street prior to being rescued. I was devastated, but with a lot of hope and a lot of humidity (and dozens of injections) Daisy recovered! Though it took almost 2 months. During this time she was unable to go outside, but her back started to recover and she was able to walk, run, and play.

 

Once Daisy was better, we took Daisy to the vet again, who told us his suspicions that Daisy is not a mixed breed, and is in fact a full breed doberman, again something I was beginning to suspect myself. That's when things started to get tough, and I realised too late that I should have done my homework!

I have had people yell at me in the street to muzzle her due to her size. People cross the street to avoid her, or simply stand and stare at her. Socializing her became difficult, because people were too scared to let their dogs near her. We were living in a tiny, dingy, old one room apartment and driving each other crazy.

I've now moved apartments in order to accommodate her size, and she is a lot happier. She has her own space, and room to run and play.

 

I love Daisy with all my heart, but I'd be lying if I said raising her alone for the last 5 months has been easy. I've grown up with and trained dogs of various breeds, sizes, temperaments.. I've never experienced anything quite like a dobie. Honestly, for a while I thought I had absolutely failed her, but reading all the advice and stories on this forum has given me hope. Daisy is in her "doberteens" right now, and every day is different. Some good, some not so good, some very not good... but we're getting there. I know I did not train her as well as I should have early on, and that has absolutely attributed to some of her behaviour problems now, but with a complete overhaul of training and dedication, she is improving massively each day. She'll also be seeing a professional trainer too, which I'm feeling hopeful about. 

 

I can hand on heart say Daisy is a wonderful dog, but I had no idea what was in store for me. Caring for a doberman is a 24/7 job, and every interaction is key, no matter how small. Daisy is a handful, but shes loving and sensitive, and wicked smart. Some days I wake up and wonder if I am doing the right thing, is she really living her best life with me.. but I try to think positively and take responsibility for making sure she has an awesome, happy, and comfortable life. I am determined to make sure Daisy can reach her full potential, through careful training and lots of love!

 

Thanks for reading ^^

Welcome to the world of Dobermans!  There truly is nothing quite like one, but they do have their challenges!

CRDobe's picture
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Joined: 2014-11-06

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Welcome! We would love to see a photo of Daisy!

daisydoo's picture
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Joined: 2020-08-04

Thank you ^^ haha i have so many photos and videos of her, but I can't seem to figure out how to upload them! Maybe because I'm using my work's computer. When I get home I'll try again ^^

DobermanGuy's picture
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Joined: 2017-12-11

I have had people yell at me in the street to muzzle her due to her size. People cross the street to avoid her, or simply stand and stare at her. Socializing her became difficult, because people were too scared to let their dogs near her. We were living in a tiny, dingy, old one room apartment and driving each other crazy.

I've now moved apartments in order to accommodate her size, and she is a lot happier. She has her own space, and room to run and play.

 

So long as the Doberman is at your side they could care less how small the place is. 

For example: I worked late as heck last night and did not feel like driving home so me and the girls camped out on one of the couches in a small office at work.

The couch (more like loveseat size) was so small that the one girl that was able to barely fit on it with me ran its full length with her body... Other Dober girl had to sleep on the floor next to us as there was no room left for her. LOL! :)

Girl that got the floor was perfectly fine with it and just glad to be in the same room with us. No issues other than that tiny couch killing my back...

 

Girl in foreground is 90lbs and got to share that tiny couch with me last night. Girl in background is every bit of 100lbs of Doberman - She got the floor next to us. LOL! :)

Never been yelled at by anyone when walking that pair of big ass Doberman dogs around...

Have a pile of work to do right now. Swamped with it... And plan to be camping out at the shop a bunch more with the girls and working as much as possible for a good while to come. Work = money and money is good. More work = more money and that is even better. :)

So long as I have enough room for me to sleep good I am ok with one or more dogs of mine getting the floor for their spot when the available room runs out but...

Aside of being too small that couch was a brick and killed my back. Could not sleep for crap on it. :(

 

Got us a futon (on sale too! :)) the other day to replace the brick couch with and pretty sure it will fit everybody and 'hopefully' not be horribly uncomfortable. Got it there but still have to take it out of the box and get everything set up. Need a few extra sets of Doberman grade sheets for it but almost there...

 

 

 

 

 

Kim
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Joined: 2012-02-05

Thank you for rescuing her!  As for people not liking her, that happened to me a lot back in the 70's when I got my first dobe.  I just made sure he was well behaved and people could see that when we were out and about. Some people came around, some didn't.  Just be the best doberman ambassador you can. It sounds like you're doing terrific with her.

My mother had a fit when I brought Rip home, and 2 weeks later was showing everybody pictures of her new "grandson."

Princesse's picture
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Joined: 2020-08-04

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Welcome Daisydoo, what a nice rescue story! I'm new also to the forums and I'm enjoying it very much. I also experience people being afraid of Duke especially at the dog park. They have that stigma in their brain about dobermans being aggressive. Although they are really protective of their owners they are also the sweetest dogs in the same time.