A dobermans passion

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Jcgraham3's picture
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Joined: 2020-12-24

After getting my new doberman about three years ago, there were many things I was not familiar with regarding my new dog. My previous dobie experience was one i acquired by taking on the dog from a previous family member owner, yet now we wanted to have an inside and outside dog that was part of the family. As she started getting older, i had developed a passion for throwing disc golf frisbee's as a means of getting a chance to get my dog outside and we both could get some exercise. Almost by accident, the frisbee chase was on and she was hooked. The disc golf frisbees are now the way of life, and by having an ability to throw them 100+/- yards, my dog gets some serious exercise. They also serve as a chew toy too, but i never dreamed she would become so solely focused on this item. By having a large yard, it has been so beneficial for her daily exercise runs. The funny thing is, if the frisbee takes an wild turn and she can't make the turn she barks accordingly, every time. Although she can be extremely strong and determined, she has been a great pet for the family. Now we have been on the fence of breeding her.

If you have time and location, a disc golf frisbee is the way to go challenging both the owner and the dog. I usually buy them used, since they get destroyed by her chewing them but we get such a kick out of watching her go all out chasing the frisbee. She won't touch a standard catch frisbee only the disc golf versions. She's even figured out how to bark at flying birds while running with the frisbee in her mouth, so hilarious. She gets so intent on chasing the frisbee, we have to tell her to go get some water and to take a break. Although she is a lot of work at times, such a joy. She has a special place in our hearts, as we got her on the very day my wife's sister died suddendly. We were on the way to her house with our new dobie girl, Ember, when the call came. So, a very special place in our hearts and memories for our family member of nearly three years.

 

She sounds like a great family pet with an obsession about frisbee  :-)  It definitely is a good way to keep her exercised for sure.  My youngest Doberman (Mabel is 2) likes her soft frisbee, but will only go after it for a few times before she loses interest. I know that her mother is a freak for her frisbee. 

You mentioned possibly breeding her. I will ask what about her makes you want to breed her?  Most dogs should not be bred - no matter how great of a pet they are. I don't want you to take what I am going to say in a negative way. If you truly want to get into the breed in a bigger way, I totally will encourage that. 

To breed responsibly, there are a lot of hoops to jump through. Dobermans are not a healthy breed, so there should be a slew of health tests done for both sire and dam.   Cardiac Ultrasound (done every year after age 2/3), 24 hour Holter monitor (a 24 hour EKG also done yearly), full thyroid panel done after they turn 2, full blood work panel including liver and kidney panel, OFA hip evaluation after age 2 (specifiic xrays sent to OFA - Orthopeadic Foundation for Animals),  Eye cerf, and VWD DNA test (done at any age).   I have had Champion Dobermans that I didn't breed because one of these tests were not what I wanted to risk passing on. 

The other thing to look at is how well they conform to the breed standard - both structure and temperament.  Depending on what you are breeding for, there should be independent measures of their conformation and/or working ability.  For me, that is an AKC Championship. I am not big in perfomance venues, but generally do train in obedience/Rally in a class situation.  If you are not into conformation, I'd want to see good structure and a lot of working titles. 

As a very occasional breeder (I've had 3 litters in my 28ish years in the breed), ethics are so important. I'm there for every owner of every puppy I've ever produced. I keep in touch with them, I support them whenever they need me, and I cry with them when a dog I produced dies.  If the need ever comes up, I will take back a dog I produced for any reason at any time.  If you cannot do those things, then don't breed - no matter how nice your bitch is. 

DobermanGuy's picture
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Joined: 2017-12-11

As a very occasional breeder (I've had 3 litters in my 28ish years in the breed), ethics are so important. I'm there for every owner of every puppy I've ever produced. I keep in touch with them, I support them whenever they need me, and I cry with them when a dog I produced dies.  If the need ever comes up, I will take back a dog I produced for any reason at any time.  If you cannot do those things, then don't breed - no matter how nice your bitch is.

 

That is the way things 'should' be in my opinion. (only recently came to this opinion but still...)

Going forward - Any potential breeder that wants my buisiness better meet or exceed your level of ethics and 'responsibility' that you outlined above or I will be looking elsewhere.

Also agree with this comment you made above:

Dobermans are not a healthy breed,

I have personally met only 3 people ever that have owned Dobermans that made it to their 'teens'. One lady had her girl make it to 13, another to 16, and just the other day met a lady that had one just recently pass at 17 yrs of age.

In my experience those sort of lifespans are about as common as winning the lottery 10 times in a row... It may be 'possible' but in reality almost never happens. Compared to the odds of a Doberman developing some sort of disease common to the breed - An owner is many, many times MORE LIKELY to end up with a Doberman that develops the disease than they are the one with the exceptional longevity.

DobermanGuy, You made me smile with your post  :-)